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Different Kinds of Indian Dishes

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It may seem daunting to cook your favorite Indian dishes at home, with the cuisine's unusual and complex spices. But, if you stock your kitchen with some of the essential ingredients found in Indian cuisine, you can easily prepare these dishes and enjoy that lively, spicy taste any time you want. From tandoori chicken to palak paneer, the recipes are relatively simple. You can even learn to make your own naan, the tasty flatbread ideal for scooping up rice and sauce.

  1. Chhole Bhature


At its core, chole bhature is a combination of two dishes: chole - a spicy chickpea curry, and bhature - a type of fried bread made with maida flour. Popular throughout North India, the dish was invented in Delhi in the 1940s.

It is commonly accompanied by onions, pickles, mint chutney, and chilled lassi. Chole bhature can be found at most street carts in North India, but it can also be easily prepared at home. Although it can be eaten any time of the day, chole bhature is especially popular in the morning, when bhature are filled with potatoes or cottage cheese, making it a heavy, nutritious breakfast.

2. Bharwa Bhindi

Bharwa Bhindi is a popular Indian side dish where the okra (bhindi) is stuffed with a spicy filling. This vegan dish goes really well with flatbread like roti or paratha.

Bhindi aka okra, is one of my favorite vegetables. In India, we cook okra a lot and almost everyone likes it. Sarvesh is a huge fan and so whenever I go to the Indian store here, I make it a point to buy some fresh okra to cook at home. At my home, bhindi was usually cooked in a very simple way with little spices. Mom always served that with roti and dal and it made such a comforting and healthy meal.

3. Kulche

Kulcha is made from maida flour, water, a pinch of salt and a leavening agent (yeast or old kulcha dough), mixed together by hand to make a very tight dough. This dough is covered with a wet cloth and left to stand for an hour or so in a warm place. The result is a slight leavening of the flour but not much. The flour is pummelled again by hand and then rolled out using a rolling pin into a flat, round shape. It is baked in an earthen clay oven ("tandoor") until done. When baked, it is often brushed with butter or ghee, although this is not necessary. It is then eaten with any Indian curry. In particular, a spicy chickpea curry known as chole is the dish of choice for being eaten with kulcha.[1]

4. Jaldi

Jalebi, also known as Jilapi, zulbia, mushabak and zalabia, is a Middle Eastern sweet snack popular all over South and Western Asia. It is made by deep-frying maida flour (plain flour or all-purpose flour) batter in pretzel or circular shapes, which are then soaked in sugar syrup.

This dessert can be served warm or cold. They have a somewhat chewy texture with a crystallized sugary exterior coating. Citric acid or lime juice is sometimes added to the syrup, as well as rose water. Jalebi is eaten with curd or rabri (North India) along with optional other flavours such as kewra (scented water).

This dish is not to be confused with similar sweets and variants like imarti and chhena jalebi

5. Masada chai

Masala chai is a tea beverage made by boiling black tea in milk and water with a mixture of aromatic herbs and spices.[2] Originating in India,[3] the beverage has gained worldwide popularity, becoming a feature in many coffee and tea houses. Although traditionally prepared as a decoction of green cardamom pods, cinnamon sticks, ground cloves, ground ginger, and black peppercorn together with black tea leaves, retail versions include tea bags for infusion, instant powdered mixtures, and concentrates.

The term "chai" originated from the Hindi word "chai", which was derived from the Chinese word for tea, cha (see: Etymology of tea). In English, this spiced tea is commonly referred to as masala chai,[4] or simply chai,[5] even though the term refers to tea in general in the original language. Numerous coffee houses use the term chai latte or chai tea latte (lit. 'tea tea milk', if each word is translated in a different language, Hindi, English, and Italian,[6] respectively) for their version to indicate that it is made with steamed milk, much like that used to make a caffè latte, but mixed with a spiced tea concentrate instead of espresso. By 1994, the term had gained currency on the U.S. coffeehouse scene.[7]

These are some most popular Indian dishes.

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