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Chinese Chicken in Wine Sauce - Imperial Concubine Chicken

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Imperial Concubine Chicken

Imperial Concubine Chicken

Imperial Concubine Chicken

Chicken Legs

Chicken Legs

Poaching Chicken

Poaching Chicken

Chinese Mushrooms

Chinese Mushrooms

Ginger Root

Ginger Root

Scallions

Scallions

Chinese Recipes

What was the Tang Dynasty?

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Imperial Concubine Chicken

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"Yang Huei Fei" was the favorite concubine of the Chinese Emperor Ming of the Tang Dynasty. She was plumply beautiful and was very fond of wine. This dish was created in her honor and it also contains a good amount of wine. It can be made with chicken wings, legs or thighs. I tend to prefer thighs.

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The chicken pieces are first blanched in boiling water and then drained and dried. They are then browned with scallions and ginger before the broth is added. Chinese mushrooms and bamboo shoots are also used in this dish and the broth is a mixture of wine, soy sauce and chicken broth. A Dutch oven is ideal for preparing this recipe but any large skillet with a cover will work.

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During the Tang Dynasty (618-907), China became the most powerful and prosperous country in the world. Its capital was called Chang'an (near Xian today) and it was the eastern terminal of the ancient "silk road".

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Difficulty:

Easy

Preparation Time:

60 Minutes

Cooking Time:

60 Minutes

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Ingredients:

2 Lbs. of Chicken Legs and Thighs

10 Chinese Dried Mushrooms (soak them in hot water until soft, discard the stems and cut them in half)

½ Cup of Bamboo Shoots (cut into thin slices)

3 Scallions (cut into 1 ½ inch lengths including the green parts)

2 Teaspoons of Ginger Root minced

3 Tablespoons of Oil

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Sauce Mixture:

2 Tablespoons Thin Soy Sauce

2 Tablespoons Black Soy Sauce

½ Cup Dry White Wine

1 Cup of Chicken Broth

½ Teaspoon Sugar

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Cooking Instructions:

  1. Blanch the chicken pieces in boiling water for 60 seconds. Then drain and rinse them in cold water and pat them dry on paper towels.
  2. Heat a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat.
  3. Add the oil and lightly brown the ginger and scallions.
  4. Brown the chicken pieces on all sides in the same pot and then add the mushrooms, bamboo shoots and sauce mixture and bring everything to a boil.
  5. Simmer covered for about 50 minutes over low heat until the chicken is tender.
  6. Serve with rice. The liquid should be reduced by about half.

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How to Poach Chicken

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Chang'an, China during the Tang Dynasty

chinese-imperial-concubine-chicken
chinese-imperial-concubine-chicken
chinese-imperial-concubine-chicken
chinese-imperial-concubine-chicken

Chang'an, China the Ancient Capital and EasternTerminal of the Silk Road (Also known as Xiangyang)

Stock Pots

Dutch Ovens

Comments

Jennifer from Lost...In Video Games and Stories on October 10, 2012:

This sounds sooooo good!

aJaguarinRed from Colorado on April 27, 2012:

You have fascinating recipes!

Deb Hirt from Stillwater, OK on April 17, 2012:

Marked useful and interesting. The black soy will add a touch of sweetness, eh?

picklesandrufus from Virginia Beach, Va on April 16, 2012:

Have never heard of this dish, but it looks easy and good. Thanks!