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Top Ten White Movie Dresses & Costumes by Genre

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Top Ten White Movie Dresses & Costumes by Genre

White Costumes in a movie can mean a lot of things in regards to a character. It can mean innocence, divinity, and purity. It can also mean coldness and a lack of emotion. Or in some periods of time the color white was a symbol of wealth and prestige.

White can be read as a few shades, from stark white to a light silver to a shimmery iridescent to even a slight beige. The important part to keep in mind is that the garment reads white on film

This page focuses on the Top Ten White Movie Costumes that for the most part are not wedding gowns. The costumes must also be primarily white with no colors from patterned fabric, like floral prints and no strong contrast. There can be colors from embellishments, details and accessories.

This page also just focuses on lady costumes from films.

This ranked list is composed in three parts based on film genres (more or less.) The costumes are separated into groups of films: Period pieces, Fantasy/Sci-fi/Comic books (anything fantastical in context) and films set roughly when they were released or Modern Movies. It should be noted that a given costume could be listed in one genre but from another, it really depends on the context of how the costume functions in film but sometimes it may not apply either. These guidelines are somewhat fluid; it really depends on the costume and what the movie is doing. So there are 30 costumes ranked here in groups of ten.

Black and white movies can be used if the color can be established either through exhibits, sketches or if the film itself makes the color clear. Also articles of clothing, like undergarments, cover-ups, sleepwear, outerwear etc are not included.

Costumes were ranked by aesthetics, memorability and how it suits the character/film. I won’t pretend my own subjective opinion didn’t matter in the ranking but it did and that is why this list is special.

Enjoy

List subject to change


For Starters

Number #10

Daisy Buchanan from The Great Gatsby

Daisy Buchanan from The Great Gatsby

Daisy Buchanan from The Great Gatsby 2013

Baz Luhrmann is known for his lush film production and his 2013 adaptation of The Great Gatsby is no expectation. It’s a dazzling spectacle of 1920’s excess. So you can well imagine that the costumes are an over-the-top mix of the 1920’s glitz with a modern couture aesthetic.

In the scene where we are first introduced to Daisy, played by Carey Mulligan, she is wearing a white robe de style dress. While it appears strapless it has an illusion neckline. This neckline paired with gossamer fabric petal details sewn on all over the dress creates an ethereal yet relaxed look. A look that while is innocent looking and demure also suggests a coquettish changeability which suits who Daisy truly is and not how she is viewed by others.

Costume design by Catherine Martin


Number #9

Rosalyn Rosenfeld from American Hustle

Rosalyn Rosenfeld from American Hustle

Rosalyn Rosenfeld from American Hustle

Based on real-life events, American Hustle is set in 1978. Jennifer Lawrence plays Rosalyn Rosenfeld, the unstable and histrionic wife of a con artist.

This white gown has a slight golden sheen and is embellished with sparkling white beading. There are also ring details at the back and most notably at the chest. It’s a slinky gown that highlights Rosalyn’s cool and detach attitude that she employes in the scene.

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This costume was also used in the film’s promotion.

Costume design by Michael Wilkinson


Number #8

Lucy Honeychurch from A Room with a View

Lucy Honeychurch from A Room with a View

Lucy Honeychurch from A Room with a View

Based on the book of the same name, A Room with a View is set in 1907. Helena Bonham-Carter plays Lucy Honeychurch, a young British lady who is on holiday in Italy with a fussy sprinter aunt.

During a scene to the Italian country, Lucy wears this stunningly detailed Edwardian garb. It’s a lightweight skirt and blouse ensemble that is perfect for a summer outing in the country. The costume has so much period appreciate detail such as lace, sheer netting and tucks.

From the silhouette, the detailing and the styling she looks like she emerged off a fashion plate which helps with the immersive experience of the film.

Costume design by Jenny Beavan and John Bright


Number #7

Orlando

Orlando

Orlando

Based on a novel by Virginia Woolf, Orlando is the story of an immortal being who changes from male to female during the ages.

Orlando spans many periods of time but during the 18th century Orlando wakes after his period of sleep and finds that he has become a woman which puts his inherited property into question.

During this section of the film Orlando has to don a huge rococo gown complete with wide panniers. As Orlando learns to maneuver in this type of dress she wears a grand white robe à la française gown. The white ruffle trim detail undulates on the bodice and bodice. The white on white adds to the otherworldly aspects of the character.

Costume design by Sandy Powell and Dien van Straalen

Number #6

Angelica Sedara from The Leopard

Angelica Sedara from The Leopard

Set in Italy in the 1860s, The Leopard is one of the most historically accurate movies with regard to how they approach costume design. The production really went for historical representation and avoided adding any touches of modernity into the costume design, make-up not withstanding.

The movie culminates in a lavish ball. For this ball every gown on screen is just right and there is a variety to them with different colors and embellishments. Angelica, played by Claudia Cardinale, wears a gorgeous white gown made from layers of organza. It features a bertha collar and ruffle details.


Costume design by Piero Tosi

Number #5

Satine's Saree Gown from Moulin Rouge

Satine's Saree Gown from Moulin Rouge

Satine's Saree Gown from Moulin Rouge

Another example of a grandiose Baz Luhrmann production. Moulin Rouge is set during the Belle epoque and focuses on starving creatives, courtesans who want to be actresses and love.

At the big finale, Satine, played by Nicole Kidman, lets her guarded emotions go as she declares her love for her penniless writer. She does this on stage as she is performing a play entitled Spectacular Spectacular that has an Indian setting. During this pivotal scene Satine is wearing this saree inspired gown which is technically her characters's wedding gown in the play.

The gown is lovely and has that very cinched silhouette that was very much in vogue with the 1900s but with grace and fluidity of a saree. Another combination is that this a white gown though the more traditional wedding in Indian would be red while white is more for mourning. Though the choice of white could have been an unintentional genius design choice as this scene is Satine’s literal swan song.

The decorative border at the bust and the hem is very much inspired by sarees as it is heavily embroidered with beading. The hem border is also draped in such a way that it forms almost a tier-like skirt.The hip is ruched on one side which adds a draped effect to the overall silhouette.

This costume strikes the right balance of simple yet striking or effortless yet dramatic. Of strong yet vulnerable. It just hits all the right notes for Satine’s character, the scene and the style of the film.

Costume designed by Catherine Martin and Angus Strathie

Number #4

Scarlett's prayer dress

Scarlett's prayer dress

Scarlett's Prayer Dress from Gone with the Wind

Originally Scarlett O'Hara, played by Vivien Leigh, wore a different dress for the opening scenes of Gone with the Wind. She wore the green spring dress she wears later in the introduction before it was changed. Producer David O Selznick wanted to put Scarlett in something virginal and thus the white prayer dress was designed. The dress is also referred to as the white ruffle dress.

The dress is covered in ruffles but the effect is lovely and sophisticated and yet it’s soft and girly as well as very elegant. It’s complicated much like Scarlett herself.

Costume Designed by Walter Plunkett


Costume Designed by Walter Plunlkett

Number #3

Emma Woodhouse's Ballgown

Emma Woodhouse's Ballgown

Emma Woodhouse Ballgown from Emma 2020

In 2020 a new version of Jane Austen's novel Emma was released. For this version the production took clues from the 2006 Marie- Antoinette movie and decided to make the color palette very pastel. For Emma Woodhouse, played by Anya Taylor-Joy, this choice helps to establish her cool and breezy attitude.

During a ball scene towards the end of the movie, Emma wears this white gown when she dances with Mr.Knightley. It is composed of a sheer over-layer and solid white under-layer. The sheer over-layer has a pale gold stripe pattern. The over-layer has puffed sleeves and is detailed with leaf and pink flower appliques. The under-layer has ruched sleeves and the hem of the skirt is padded.

This version of Emma has exquisite costumes that all look very much like a fashion plate from the period.

Costume Designed by Alexandra Byrne


Number #2

Eliza Doolittle Embassy Ball Gown from My Fair Lady

Eliza Doolittle Embassy Ball Gown from My Fair Lady

Eliza Doolittle Embassy Ball Gown from My Fair Lady

It’s a well known fact that Audrey Hepburn while being an all around wonderful person wore many, many iconic looks. For her role as Eliza in My Fair Lady she had at two iconic looks. This gown is one Eliza wore to the Embassy Ball, the event that the whole movie was building to which was too see if Higgins could make Eliza pass as a posh lady.

For this grand soiree, Eliza wears this very dazzling gown. The gown is more to the taste of the 1960s rather than the 1910s. It has a sheath silhouette with a loose beaded sheer overlay with beaded fringe trim at the neckline and the cap sleeves.

Despite it being more modern in the design approach, the costume is still absolutely gorgeous and eye-catching.

Costume Designed by Cecil Beaton


Number #1

 Danielle in Ever After

Danielle in Ever After

Danielle de Barbarac Just Breathe Gown from Ever After

Often referred to as the Breath Gown, Danielle, played by Drew Barrymore, wears this gown to a masque ball in Ever After which is a retelling of the Cinderella story. The costume is a show stopper with just so many beautiful details.

Within the context of the movie this gown is Danielle’s mother's wedding gown and was meant to be Danielle’s dowry. There is drama in the movie about who will wear it to the big upcoming masque ball. Untimely Danielle wears this gown with large angel wings and stunning beaded glass slippers.

The silhouette looks fairly simple but it does seem to be inspired by 14th century Venetian gowns which makes it look old-fashioned within the movie but the characters in the film are more charmed by this aspect than they are off-put by the gown’s style.

While the gown does read white on film it has more of a silvery tone. The amount of embellishment set this gown apart from the rest of the costumes in this movie which are all beautiful. This gown however has multitude of glistening seed beads paired with metallic thread embroidery, shimmering lace and pearls sewn on as trim and accents. The gown looks regal and ethereal.

Behind the scenes another costume had been designed for the ball but Drew Barrymore wanted something more for the scene. So that other costume was used in an another scene and this costume was created for Danielle's grand entrance to the ball.

Costume Designed by Jenny Beaven and gown made by Jane Law


Number #10

 Tracy Lord from The Philadelphia Story

Tracy Lord from The Philadelphia Story

Tracy Lord from The Philadelphia Story

It’s hard to believe now that Katherine Hepburn’s film career was very nearly finished in 1938. What saved it? The play version of The Philadelphia Story, which was written with Hepburn in mind. On the advice of Howard Hughes, Hepburn acquired a portion of the play which meant that any film version would have to meet with her approval. This gave her power to position herself in a starring role and to choose the other leads and the director.

In The Philadelphia Story, Hepburn plays Tracy Lord, a wealthy socialite who is prepping for her wedding when a reporter and ex-husband come and make her question the wedding. Basically critics saw Tracy, a cool goddess who has to be brought down to earth and her arc sees that her perfection is not strength but a weakness.

The concept of the cool un-earthly goddess is showcased in her costumes. Most particularly in her pre-wedding gown. It’s a more Hollywood glamorized version of a greek goddess than a draped chiton-inspired moment but you can see the idea of the concept clearly in the design.

The most striking part of the gown is the gold embroidery pattern in the bodice which makes up the collar and the wide waistband but also extends down the long sleeves. The pattern uses braided trim and sequins. The sleeves are fitted at the forearms and left draped and loose in the upper arm.

Costume Designed by Adrian

Honorable mention to the musical remake High Society with Grace Kelly whose swimsuit cover is also lovely.

Number #9

Elvira Hancock from Scarface

Elvira Hancock from Scarface

Elvira Hancock from Scarface

Cool and detached from her reality, Elvira Hancock, played by Michelle Pfeiffer, is a classic ice queen. Her costumes throughout Scarface perfectly capture a sense of nostalgia mixed with early1980s modern sleekness.

In the scenes where she is with Tony and rejects him, she wears a stark white suit that is very minimal in its styling. This showcases her icy demeanor and does not betray any emotion by means of ornamentation or fussy styling.

Owing to its minimal sensibilities this strong suit of Elvira still looks timeless and super chic.

Costume Designed by Patricia Norris


Number #8

Louisa May Foster from What a Way to Go!

Louisa May Foster from What a Way to Go!

Louisa May Foster from What a Way to Go!

If there was only one reason to watch this over-the-top campy comedy from 1964, the costumes would not be the worst reason. In fact it is one of the best reasons. Other reasons include the cast, the overall silliness and the way the movie lampoon film styles.

To put it mildly the costumes range from simple, to over the top to outright lavish in What a way to go! This gown called ‘The Diamond Gown” is one of the most lavish gowns in the movie. It is worn during one of the sequences where Louisa, played by Shirley MacLaine, likens her marriages to a film genre. This one is like a non-stop parade of gorgeous costumes.

This beaded sleeveless sheath dress with its plunging neckline is decked out in Harry Winston diamonds. It’s a shame it’s not on screen longer but it was one of the costume used in the film promo

Honorable mention to the backless pearl white look that we didn’t see the front of.

Costume Designed by Edith Head


Number #7

Angela Vickers from A Place in the Sun

Angela Vickers from A Place in the Sun

Angela Vickers from A Place in the Sun

The gown that Elizabeth Taylor’s character wears in A Place in the Sun is considered to be one of the most copied gowns in film history. Elizabeth Taylor plays Angela Vickers, a beautiful young debutante. In her introductory scene Angela meets George while he is playing pool.

The gown is based on Dior’s New Look which only made its debut two year before the gown’s conception. It is strapless with a sweetheart neckline. The bodice is decorated with small white violet details that also are on the skirt. The skirt is made from yards and yards of tulle making it very voluminous. The waistline is very nipped in giving Taylor the opportunity to show off her already small waist which she was very proud of.

The effect of the gown is a piece that is stylish and timeless and it lead the way for what is considered a standard princess dress.

Costume Designed by Edith Head

Number #6

Catherine Tramell from Basic Instinct

Catherine Tramell from Basic Instinct

Catherine Tramell from Basic Instinct

Catherine Tramell, played by Sharon Stone, is another prime example of an ice queen. Depicted as a Femme Fatal character in 1992 movie Basic Instinct, Catherine excludes a classic cool that makes her exciting yet dangerous.

Her costume during the infamous police interrogation scene is very simple. It’s a simple knit turtleneck dress that is sleeveless and very short. She pairs this dress with an iconic matching coat. The minimal approach to the design is meant to convey her innocence to the police, as in she is trying to convince them that she did not commit a murder but it also conveys her certain type of power she over people as a femme fatal.

The scene is one of the most memorable scenes from the scene and from the 90s.

Costume Designed by Ellen Mirojnick


Number #5

Cher Horowitz from Clueless

Cher Horowitz from Clueless

Cher Horowitz from Clueless

Clueless is a treasure trove of 1990s style. All of Cher’s, played by Alicia Silverstone, are stylish, iconic, and on point for her character.

This very simple white mini-dress is one of Cher’s most iconic dresses in the movie. Mostly this due to comedic exchange with her father which ends in Cher’s classic “Calvin Klein” line.

It is is very much in the same vein of style as Klein’s sense of design as it’s modern and minimal. This was also very in vogue in the 90s but it still looks timeless and chic even now.

Costume Designed by Mona May


Number #4

Maggie Pollitt from Cat on Hot Tin Roof

Maggie Pollitt from Cat on Hot Tin Roof

Maggie Pollitt from Cat on Hot Tin Roof

The white cocktail dress that Elizabeth Taylor’s character Maggie wore in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof was a sensation. It consists of a beautifully draped grecian inspired bodice with a v-neckline. The skirt is short and full. This dress truly highlights Taylor curves.

This dress brilliantly showcases Maggie’s character as a strong-willed attractive vivacious woman. The dress is also graceful, elegant, sultry and stylish.

Costume Designed by Helene Rose


Number #3

Juliet from Romeo + Juliet

Juliet from Romeo + Juliet

Juliet from Romeo + Juliet

Yet another Baz Luhrmann movie. This time it was his sensational late 90s modern retelling of William Shakespeare’s Romeo + Juliet. This version casts Leonardo DiCaprio right at his teen heartthrob phase and Claire Danes in the title roles.

Arguably the most memorable scenes in this version are when the lovers meet through the fish tank, the party scenes and the pool scene which is the balcony scene. As the party is a costume party Juliet wears an angel costume which reflects her personality.

The dress is long with a billowy flowy skirt. The neckline is rounded and is sleeveless. The bodice looks like it’s pin-tucked and the waistband is wide with a draped effect. She pairs this look with a pearl cross on a long silver chain.

The costume keeps to the 90s sense of minimal style as it has little embellishment other than the angle wings. Despite the minimal approach it takes an eternal essence.

Costume Designed by Kym Barrett


Number #2

Frances Stevens from To Catch a Thief

Frances Stevens from To Catch a Thief

Frances Stevens from To Catch a Thief

Grace Kelly epitomized the 1950’s concept of the glamorous movie star. She was sultry, effortless and just perfect.

One of her most glamorous roles was Frances Stevens in Alfred Hitchcock's To Catch a Thief. As if a story about diamonds mixed with the French Riviera couldn’t be glamorous.

As fireworks go off in the background, France wears this stunning white gown as she reveals to Cary Grant’s character, John, that she knows who he is, a former jewel thief.

Frances exudes cool refinement and the gown she wears in this scene reflects this aspect of her character. It’s a sumptuous strapless gown made from a diaphanous fabric that evokes grecian classic lines and drapery. The drape on the bodice details are also reminiscent of Madame Gres who was known for intricate drapes and pleats on her garments. On Frances’ gown the drapes cross around the bodice adding a sense of fluidity and grateful delicacy.

Not only is the gown beautiful but it’s very alluring which compliments the sense and Frances’ motivations.

Costume Designed by Edith Head


Number #1

 The Girl from The Seven Year Itch

The Girl from The Seven Year Itch

The Girl from The Seven Year Itch

Even if you haven’t seen The Seven Year Itch, you know this dress. This dress is synonymous with Marilyn Monroe’s iconography. It is one of the most well known garments in film history.

The dress itself is fairly simple, It’s a white halter with a plunging neckline. The fabric is very softly pleated. The bodice is made up of two pieces, the halter which is attached at the bust and then is very close fitting. At the waist there is a soft belt that criss-crosses at the front before wrapping around the waist and forms a bow at the front on the side.

This costume is just iconic plus it’s pretty much an emblematic of Marilyn’s on-screen persona.

Costume Designed by William Travilla

Number #10

Snow White from Mirror Mirror

Snow White from Mirror Mirror

Snow White from Mirror Mirror

Mirror Mirror is a fantastical retelling of Snow White. The stunning costume helps play up this silly yet very imaginative retelling as they are just super over the top, grand and very beautiful.

This costume of Snow White’s, played by Lily Collins, is worn during a masquerade scene. She actually is trying to blend but the elaborate headdress and wings don’t help much. Not only is this gown worn during the ball but she wears it when she is put into exile in the snowy forest where a fearsome beast lurks and when she teams-up with the dwarves.

The skirt is full. There is on overskirt with a featherlike edging. It has a sweetheart neckline with some lace trim. The sleeves are padded and puffed. The bodice is embellished with lace appliques and comes to very dramatic point at the waistline. She wears sheer fingerless gloves that has the same lace appliques and pearl buttons.

While the gown does get overshadowed by the headdress, the gown itself is very lovely, delicate and whimsical.

Costume Designed by Eiko Ishioka


Number #9

Leeloo  from 5th Element

Leeloo from 5th Element

Leeloo from 5th Element

5th Element is a campy yet visually dazzling sci-fi action movie. The film has a bright, bold and imaginative approach to futuristic style that is so out there and audacious that it shoots the moon and has an oddly timeless look. Sometimes futuristic sci-fi movies can look dated and maybe by the 23th century it will look dated but for now it still looks awesome, fun and creative.

One of the most iconic looks from the movie is Leeloo, played by Milla Jovovich, in a bandage outfit. She wears this in her introductory scene when her DNA is regenerated.

The outfit itself is quite simple and yet very daring. It’s composed of straps that are connected down and across the body and around the neck. The bands end at mid-calf. The stark white paired with Leeloo’s bright orange hair just makes the look incredibly striking and unique.

And according to the costume designer in an interview with vogue, this super iconic costume was a last minute creation.

Costume Designed by Jean-Paul Gautier


Number #8

The Childlike Empress The Never Ending Story

The Childlike Empress The Never Ending Story

The Childlike Empress The Never Ending Story

The 1980s were a great time for super imaginative children's fantasy movies that never shied away from getting dark and The Never Ending Story definitely has its dark hard to watch moments.

Based on the first half of the book of the same name, the first movie culminates in the world of Fantasia ending and the the Child-like Empress, played by Tami Stronach, begging the human child reader of the story to call out her new name thus restoring the world and saving it from the threat of the nothing.

Her costume is very ethereal which suits the mythical otherworldliness of her character. It has an Art Nouveau sensibility with the chiffon bodice that has some lovely lace detail. The bodice has pearl beads arranged in vertical clusters. The waistband is also beaded with pearls as the hem of her sheer sleeves with an additional silver pattern. The sleeves could be some kind of outer layer like a cloak. The skirt has a gold line detail. The most eye-catching component of this costume is the pearl and gold headpiece she wears at her forehead.

It's the perfect costume for a regal, magical yet innocent de


Costume Designed by Count Ul de Rico & Diemut Remy

Number #7

Belle from La Belle et Bête 2014

Belle from La Belle et Bête 2014

Belle from La Belle et Bête 2014

This is a 2014 retelling of Beauty and the Beast. It seems to be loosely inspired by the 1946 Jean Cocteau version but it’s very much its own version with absolutely stunning costumes. They are seriously gorgeous.

This white gown is the first one Belle wears when she arrives at the Beast’s enchanted castle and meets him for the first time. The movie suggests that all the garments Belle wears in the castle were created through magic.

This gown is ivory in tone with a very subtle pattern. The neckline has a wide collar that stands up giving the gown even more drama. The gown has a lot of smocking details through its construction and intriguing structural puff detail at the elbows.

This gown is very intricate giving it a magical quality that is just enchanting.

Costume Designed by Pierre-Yves Gayraud

Also shout out the costumes of Jean Cocteau’s version which are also stunning and beautiful but not sure of the colors of those pieces. Some could be white but it’s hard to know for certain.


Number #6

Padme’s Battle Arena Outfit

Padme’s Battle Arena Outfit

Padme’s Battle Arena Outfit from Star Wars Episode II

There is no denying that the costumes in the Star Wars prequel trilogy were amazing where Padme Amidala’s, played by Natalie Portman, looks were concerned. On the whole her wardrobe is made up of beautiful and intricate costumes. However she does sport some more utilitarian looks especially during the action scenes.

She wears this costume during the climax of Episode II during the big action set pieces. It stands out from her other looks as it's more practical. It is composed of a form fitting long sleeve shirt and matching pants. The high neckline has a collar that sits a little away from her neck. On the bodice of the shirt are line details. She pairs the look with a wool cap, silver band worn on the upper arms, a utility belt and padded boots.

The look changes as the action progresses as she loses the cape and her shirt torn away during the arena sequence. So it’s two looks in one.

Most likely she is wearing white to echo Leia’s costumes from the original trilogy but this costume is iconic on its own merits.

Also honorable mention to Padme’s celebration gown she wore at the end of Episode I, that one is lovely too.

Costume Designed by Trisha Biggar


Number #5

Princess Leia from Star Wars; A New Hope

Princess Leia from Star Wars; A New Hope

Princess Leia from Star Wars; A New Hope

The dress that Princess Leia, played by Carrie Fisher, wears in the beginning of A New Hope is an icon. It’s the costume everyone thinks of when they think of Leia. And yet it’s so very simple and understated.

Leia wears this costume throughout most of the runtime of A New Hope. It’s a high necked loose fitting dress with long bell sleeves. She cinches it in at the waist with a silver belt. There is also a hood which adds mystery and a little drama when she chooses.

It’s the epitome of simplicity however there is an edge and a sophistication to it that is memorable and timeless.

Costume Designed by John Mollo


Number #4

Queen Ramonda from Black Panther

Queen Ramonda from Black Panther

Queen Ramonda from Black Panther

The costumes of Black Panther are a fantastic blend of traditional African garments mixed with advanced technological innovations. This thoughtful approach to the film's visual look is so representational of the setting of Wakanda and the characters.

This costume of Queen Ramonda, played by Angela Bassett, showcases this exquisite blending of modernity and tradition in one regal costume.

This costume one meant to establish Ramonda as Queen with one glance. Before she utters one line of dialogue, it is understood that she is someone of significant importance in the royal family.

Her costume is composed of an intricate 3D printed shoulder mantle and isicholo. These parts of the costume perfectly encapsulate the advanced technology mixed with traditional African garments aesthetics. The dress is an A-line silhouette with a squared neckline. There is a metallic geometric design on the gown.

In addition to being majestic and regal it’s just so perfect for the style of the movie, the character and the scene.

Costume Designed by Ruth E. Carter


Number #3

Mary Poppins Jolly Holiday Dress

Mary Poppins Jolly Holiday Dress

Mary Poppins Jolly Holiday Dress

While it may not seem like the most fantastical costume ever to grace a film within the context of Mary Poppins, it is pure fantasy.

Mary Poppins, played by Julie Andrews, uses her magic to transport herself, Bert, and the children into a chalk painting as a fun excursion. The result is a colorful cartoon world where our characters partake in some of the most fun and whimsical scenes in the movie.

The outfit is a fantastical take on Edwardian summer time attire. It consists of an ankle length lace dress with red accents of ribbon trim at the neck and cuffs, bows, a wide red corset belt and red tips on her boots with red laces. Under the dress are some pinkish-hue petticoats which add some lovely moments to the musical numbers .

The Jolly Holiday portion of the film is one the stand out segments of a beloved endearing film.

This costume is one of the costumes that the face characters who play Mary in the Disney parks wear when engaging with guests.

Costume Designed by Gertrude Casey and Chuck Keehne


Number #2

Arwen in The Lord of the Rings

Arwen in The Lord of the Rings

Arwen in The Lord of the Rings

The first time we see Arwen, played by Liv Tyler, in Fellowship of the Ring, it is after Frodo is stabbed by the witch-king and is poisoned. In Frodo's delirium he sees Arwen riding a horse and clad in white. Her costume as Frodo sees her for the first time is a very ethereal gown with flowing fabric that seems to radiate light.

There are actually two costumes worn by Arwen in Frodo’s soft focused dream-like illusion. The one where she gets off her horse and the one where she speaks to him. As she dismounts you can sort of make out a white cloak. This cloak is called the halo cloak and it was worn with a different dress, also called the halo gown.

The Angel dress is the one that was used in the re-shoots and is the more familiar one even though it is only on screen for a brief scene.

It has a split over dress and split bell sleeves with narrow sleeves underneath. It has a scoop neckline embellished with lace, embroidery and beading. The color is silver-white which adds to its dream-like angelic grace of Arwen’s first impression.

Costume designed by Ngila Dickson.

Number #1

 Sarah from Labyrinth

Sarah from Labyrinth

Sarah's Ball Gown from Labyrinth

Sarah's Ball Gown isn't as timeless as other costumes but that is part of its charm. It's big, puffy and 100% pure fantasy.

In Labyrinth, Sarah, played by Jennifer Connelly, inadvertently had her baby brother taken away by the Goblin King and thus she goes on a quest to save the young child from turning into a goblin.

As means to stop her the Goblin King has her poisoned by eating a peach. The poison causes her to have a hallucination. In the hallucination, she is at a venetian inspired masked ball trying to find the Goblin King amongst the crowd.

The gown reads white but it has a silver, pearl-like quality that makes it look luminous on screen. On the bodice there are gold details which look like beaded appliques. The sleeves are long and have a double puff while the neckline is off the shoulder making her look more vulnerable in the scene.

The whole look has a very 1980’s take on art-nouveau while being ethereal, innocent and quite beautiful.


Costume Designed by Ellis Flyte & Brian Froud

The White Poll

Jennifer Connelly as Sarah and David Bowie as Jareth in The Labyrith

Jennifer Connelly as Sarah and David Bowie as Jareth in The Labyrith

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