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The Handmaid’s Tale Review

As an independent writer, she worked as an editor in a number of Alexandria websites, and her novel Rathways of Gods won the Prize

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The Handmaid’s Tale review



Margaret Atwood, a novel by World Poker Award-winning Canadian writer, appeared in 1985, was adapted into a film in 1990, and in 2017 into a four-part series by Bruce Miller, who wrote and directed, while the series' main protagonist, actress Elizabeth Moss, was also co-produced and directed.


Hulu was produced by Hulu Hulu, from Volume 1 (2017) to Part 3 (2019), Part 4 (2021) was somewhat different, in terms of MGM's involvement in production, and Margaret Atwood's 2019 novel The Testaments was set for Part 4.
The series revolves around a civil war in the United States of America, followed by a revolution that gives rise to the nation of Gilead, a theocratic country based on religious Biblical and Torah texts. Its leaders assert that their country was created by war against those who went against religion.


They caused disease and environmental pollution that destroyed farmland. It was no longer possible to get good food, fertility rates fell, the number of births decreased dramatically. Women in Gilead become second-class citizens Writing or participating in all aspects of life, only their role to procreate and raise children.


Gilad is called egalitarianism and it stands for justice, but it depends on class: there is the ruling class that is the leaders; there is the eye class, that is, the spies, to ensure that orders are carried out in Gilad, not to go outside; the guards, the ordinary citizens, and the maids who supervise the leaders' house; and there is a different class that is childbearing, the women who are captured, to give birth to the leaders in order to increase the population of Gilad.


The story begins with John Azopon, a woman kidnapped along with her daughter in Gilead, her daughter Hannah being housed with the family of a Gilead leader, and John herself changing her name to Ofred, a Gilead tradition of naming each child after the leader who lives in his home.


She serves in the home of another leader, Fred, because his wife Serena cannot have children, and John is forced to have sexual intercourse with Ofred once a month, with religious rituals and biblical texts recited in an effort to make it socially acceptable.


Serena," the leader's wife, gets her toe cut off when she reads some scriptures, women have no right to love, marry, or educate, and women who go out of their own free will if they are childbearing or even a woman of society, are killed, sent to the colonies where they work in nuclear-rife lands, and tortured in the worst possible ways.


The events of Part 4, the best of which, consists of 10 episodes, present John's attempt with a group of childbearing women to rebel against the laws of Gilead and escape to obtain their right to a normal life outside her walls, after they have smuggled over 70 children to Canada, and in preparation for their escape reside inside the home of an elderly leader, whose wife is frequently raped by other commanders and guards to give birth, making the wife wish to escape from Gilead prison.


But John is arrested, and she confesses the location of the children after threatening to torture her daughter “Hana” and lock her in a glass cage, and after their arrest, the mothers are subjected to brutal torture.


She can leave Gilad alone in disguise and arrive in Canada, her journey begins to testify about her torture and the situation of Gilad women, but encounters that the co-torturer, John Watford, has made a deal with U.S.

government representatives in Canada, and he will be acquitted in exchange for full confessions about the Gilad regime, and the series ends with John Watford killing her Commander Waterford.

The series has won more than 21 awards for acting, directing, writing, music and decorations, and is well deserved.


The series received 75 nominations and 15 awards over a four-year period since its debut in 2017.
It is an adaptation of Margaret Atwood, a novel by World Poker Award-winning Canadian writer, which appeared in 1985, was adapted into a film in 1990, and in 2017 into a four-part series by Bruce Miller, who wrote and directed, while the series' main protagonist, actress Elizabeth Moss, was also co-produced and directed.

the-handmaids-tale-review
the-handmaids-tale-review

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