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My Silent Movie Obsession

I've been a silent movie buff since childhood. Silent movies will always hold a special place in my heart.

"The Son of the Sheik"

"The Son of the Sheik"

I've Been obsessed with Silent Films Since I First Saw Rudolph Valentino in The Sheik

In the early 1970s, I saw "The Sheik," starring the great Rudolph Valentino. Later on, I was thrilled to watch its sequel, "Son of the Sheik." I've been obsessed with silent movies ever since!

Give me Rudolph Valentino, Colleen Moore, Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin, Clara Bow, Harold Lloyd, Buster Keaton, Gloria Swanson, Ramon Novarro, Joan Crawford (yes, she was a silent movie actress, too!), Lilian Gish, Lon Chaney, and Louise Brooks any day of the week. Some things just can't be improved upon.

Keep your high tech movies with 3 D, surround sound, computerized graphics, and mind-boggling special effects. I would rather watch a movie of the era when "actors had faces." Silent movies can be flickering, grainy, and even ghostly; but, as far as I'm concerned, that only adds to their charm. Silent movies--the ones that were created by true artists, are to be treasured, much like a da Vinci painting.


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To Learn More About the Silent Movie Era, Read The Parade's Gone By by Kevin Brownlow

Written by Kevin Brownlow, the world's foremost authority on silent films and silent film restoration, The Parade's Gone By, is considered the "bible" of the silent film era. I own this book and love it! Be sure to check out the many buying options to get the cheapest price available.

The Silent Years of Slapstick Comedy - A Funny Collage of Wacky Scenes to Tickle Your Funny Bone

Favorite Silent Movie Poll

Clara Bow--The "It" Girl!

Clara Bow in the 1920s

Clara Bow in the 1920s

"It" movie poster

"It" movie poster

It with Clara Bow--The Darling of the Jazz Age!

"It," a silent romantic comedy, and one of the first concept films, had its world premiere on January 14, 1927. Causing a sensation, the film broke box office records and made Clara Bow a major star. Bow would forever after be known as the "It" girl.

Paramount Pictures paid Eleanor Glynn $50,000.00 for the concept, credited her for her story and adaptation, and gave her a small part in the movie, in which she played herself. In February 1927, Cosmopolitan published a two-part serial story written by Glynn in which she defined "it": "That quality possessed by some which draws all others with its magnetic force. With 'It' you win all men if you are a woman and all women if you are a man. 'It' can be a quality of the mind as well as a physical attraction."

The movie has a universal plot--that of the poor shop girl who falls in love with a man above her station. The first time Betty Lou Spence (Clara Bow) sets eyes on her new boss, Cyrus Waltham, Jr. (Antonio Moreno), manager and heir to the world's largest store, she falls head over heels, enthusiastically proclaiming, "Sweet Santa Claus, give me him!" Betty doesn't wait for Christmas as she sets out to snag the boss for her very own. One small problem prevails: he is already engaged to socialite Adela Van Norman (Jacqueline Gadsden).

The boss doesn't notice Betty, but his silly friend Monty (William Austin) does; Betty uses his interest in her to get closer to the boss, who finally takes her on a date to Coney Island, where both have a grand time riding roller coasters and eating hot dogs. When the boss takes Betty home and tries to kiss her, she slaps his face, hurrying out of his car and back to her flat, which confuses him.

To further complicate matters, Betty pretends her sick roommate's baby is hers in order to protect her friend, Molly (Priscilla Bonner) from meddling welfare workers who want to take her baby away. Monty arrives at just the right moment, and, of course, tells all to the boss. In love with Betty, but shocked at what he mistakenly believes to be the truth, the boss proposes an "arrangement" to Betty in which she will be nothing more than a mistress. Enraged, Betty quits her job and vows to forget her boss.

When Betty learns that the incident with her boss was all a misunderstanding, she resolves to teach him a lesson. Upon learning that her boss is hosting a yachting excursion, Betty, masquerading as "Miss Van Cortland," goes as Monty's guest. When the boss discovers Betty on the ship, he plans to throw her off, but is overcome by her "it" factor. Will the boss propose? will Betty accept? Watch the movie and find out.

Red Hair

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The Beginning of a Life-Long Love Affair

From the first time I ever laid eyes on a silent movie, I was hooked. As a child, I delighted in the bumbling antics of slapstick comedy, especially the Keystone Cops. I thrived on the irrational story lines and the ridiculous shenanigans of the instigators. My favorite comedy stars of the era include Harold Lloyd, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Colleen Moore, and the comedy team of Laurel and Hardy.

As a teen, I was introduced to dramatic silent films. The first one I remember watching was "The Sheik," in the early 1970s. There was no talking in this picture, but it wasn't needed; in a movie such as this, in my opinion, speaking would be detrimental to its artistry.

During the silent movie era, actors conveyed emotion through facial expressions, gestures, and body language; title cards did the rest. The music, beautifully played at the movie house by a live orchestra (in the larger theatres), pipe organ, or piano, coincided with action and mood as well as the location of each scene in the movie.

As I watched The Sheik, I felt myself being transported through time. I reveled in the melodrama and eccentricity of the story, the larger-than-life acting, and the outlandish costumes; I became wholeheartedly immersed in this decadent spectacle before me. I was the beautiful maiden--not Agnes Ayres-- who was being pursued by the gorgeous and virile sheik, played by Rudolph Valentino--swoon!


Laurel and Hardy

Laurel and Hardy

Rudolph Valentino in "The Sheik"

Rudolph Valentino in "The Sheik"

The Sheik Starring Rudolph Valentino and Agnes Ayres, 1921

"The Sheik" movie poster

"The Sheik" movie poster

"The Sheik" is based on the bestselling romance novel of the time, The Sheik, written by Edith Maude Hull. Produced in 1921 by Famous Players-Lasky and directed by George Melford, the movie stars Rudolph Valentino, Agnes Ayres, and Adolphe Menjou.

The Sheik centers on Diana, a headstrong English beauty (Agnes Ayres) who, after turning down a marriage proposal, plans a month long trek into the desert. Diana, disguised as a harem girl, boldly enters a local casino that women are banned from entering. Inside the casino, Diana is shocked to find men gambling for new wives. When Diana comes up as the next prize, Sheik Ahmed Ben Hassan (Valentino) intervenes. Startled to find out she is white, an amused Ahmed decides to let her go.

When Mustapha Ali (Charles Brinley) informs Ahmed that Diana is the woman that he has been hired to guide the next day, Ahmed hatches a plan: sneaking into her room as she is sleeping, he removes the bullets from her revolver. Finding Diana riding alone in the desert the next day, Ahmed captures her and forcibly carries her away to his tent.

Will Sheik Ahmed force himself upon Diana? Will Diana escape? Watch the movie to experience the fascinating storyline and see the riveting conclusion.

The Sheik/ The Son of the Sheik DVD

I own this wonderful DVD that includes both "The Sheik," and its sequel, "The Son of the Sheik." Also included are three shorts: "Rudolph Valentino and His 88 American Beauties," "The Sheik's Physique," and Pathe' newsreel coverage of Valentino's funeral in 1926.

The Sheik, which was released in 1921, was unlike anything ever seen before. Women fainted in the aisles, and enraged men walked out of the theatre. The Sheik made Valentino a big star, and many men emulated him with their slicked-back hairstyles. "Sheik," became a term used to describe an attractive, virile man during this time and throughout the 1920s.

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Camille with Alla Nazimova and Rudolph Valentino, 1921

I don't yet own this movie, but, thankfully, I've had the pleasure of watching it many times on YouTube. This version of Camille is deliciously different. I enjoy the lavish art deco sets and the flamboyant look of this Camille (played by Alla Nazimova) who sports a big hairstyle, and dramatic makeup and demeanor. Nazimova's gestures and facial expressions are exaggerated and over-the-top, which only adds to the charm of this melodramatic production. Nazimova delivers a very poignant and dramatic performance, which I greatly enjoy. I also found Rudolph Valentino's performance in this movie very endearing and touching.

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Rudolph Valentino and Alla Nazimova in "Camille"

Rudolph Valentino and Alla Nazimova in "Camille"

Scene from "Camille"

Scene from "Camille"

Alla Nazimova and Rudolph Valentino in "Camille"

Alla Nazimova and Rudolph Valentino in "Camille"

Scene from "Camille"

Scene from "Camille"

Camille--a Study in Melodrama

"Camille" is a screen adaptation of La Dame aux Camelias by Alexandre Dumas, fils. The original play opened in Paris in 1852; the first Broadway production was presented in 1853. Since then, there have been 15 Broadway revivals, and numerous screen adaptations.

In this version, the setting is moved to 1920s Paris. One of my favorite things about this movie are the lavish art deco sets, especially Marguerite's apartment. Natacha Rambova, who would later become Valentino's second wife, was the talented art director.

Armand (Valentino) finds himself drawn to Marguerite (Nazimova), who is constantly surrounded by suitors, whom she entertains at her lavish apartment. Tragically, the beautiful Marguerite isn't well; she is racked with consumption, suffering bouts of illness.

Armand pursues Marguerite, who at first rejects his advances, but eventually gives in. The two live together happily until Armand's father convinces Marguerite to give him up in order to save the family's reputation. Marguerite leaves a note for Armand (failing to tell Armand the real reason she left), then runs away with a wealthy client. Devastated, then furious, Armand takes up with another courtesan, Olympe, and pubicly denounces Marguerite when he runs into her at a casino.

Sick, alone, and in massive debt, Camille's courtesan days are over. As she lay dying, her belongings are reposessed. Camille begs the men confiscating her belongings to allow her to keep her most treasured posession--a book given to her by Armand. Upon learning of Marguerite's condition, Armand frantically rushes to her bedside. But, is it too late? Watch the movie to find out.

My First Foray into Silent Film Collecting

While in my early teens, I began collecting silent movies so I could enjoy them at my leisure. During the early 1970s, we didn't have DVD or even VHS players in the home. If you wanted to watch movies that weren't shown on television, the only alternative was to purchase movie reels and play them on a movie projector.

I saved up money from my allowance until I had enough money to purchase my first silent movies. I already had a movie projector, which I had received the previous Christmas from my parents. In a magazine ad, I discovered a company known as Blackhawk Films, who sold movie reels of all sorts of silent classics, from slapstick to drama. They sent me a catalog from which I selected five movies: "Sugar Daddies;" a 1927 Hal Roach comedy short featuring the famous team of Laurel and Hardy; "Kid Auto Races," and "A Busy Day" (both on the same reel), starring Charlie Chaplin; and "Rudolph Valentino and His 88 Bathing Beauties," as well as a couple of other movie shorts.

I whiled away many happy hours in my bedroom watching these silent movies, which were projected on an old 1950s folding screen borrowed from my parents. I also went one step further: I composed my own soundtracks to go with them, which made watching them all the more enjoyable. In order to do this, I played original records from that era on my antique 1920s era wind-up phonograph, which was essentially powered by a giant spring. Sometimes I had to wind up the phonograph in the middle of a song, or the song would end up going in slow motion. I got a kick out of hearing the song wind down, then suddenly speed up as the handle was turned.

I played the records that I felt refected the action of each scene in the movie, then recorded them on a reel-to-reel player, which I still own. After that, whenever I watched the movies, I would play the appropriate composition, enhancing my movie watching experience even more with my unique soundtracks.

My sister, Melanie, whom I shared a room with, was tickled pink about my new interest in silent movie collecting; in my effort to simulate a movie theatre, I actually cleaned up my side of the bedroom--YIPPEE!

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Blackhawk Silent Movies, Purchased in the Early Seventies

As a teen, I watched these movies over and over again. My favorite one was the Laurel and Hardy feature, "Sugar Daddies."

As a teen, I watched these movies over and over again. My favorite one was the Laurel and Hardy feature, "Sugar Daddies."

Time Marches On--But My Interest in Silents is Still as Strong as Ever!

As the years went by, I grew up, graduated from college, got married, and had a child. When VHS came out, I was gifted with a humongous set of Charlie Chaplin movies in a VHS boxed set that contained ten volumes of movie shorts--twenty VHS tapes in all. The collection consisted of Chaplin's early shorts, such as "The Immigrant," "The Floorwalker," and "Mabel's Strange Predicament." I was entertained by this great collection of Chaplin slapstick comedies for many years.

When VHS bit the dust, and DVD came on the market, I became one of Amazon's best customers! I delight in adding new silents to my collection, most with which I gift myself on special occasions such as Christmas, birthdays, and Valentine's Day. My husband, who has no idea what to buy me, just leaves it up to me--I have the best time picking out my favorite silent movies!

My favorite method of collecting silent movies is to add anything that I'm interested in to my Amazon wish list. Then, when ready to buy, I simply browse my list, adding my selections to my shopping cart. One of my favorite methods of choosing silent movies for my wish list is to watch them on YouTube first, if possible. That way, I can decide if I like them before buying. If I happen to see a silent on TV I like that's available on DVD, I add that to my Amazon wish list, too.


Charlie Chaplin boxed VHS set

Charlie Chaplin boxed VHS set

What is it About Silent Movies?

Silent movies seem to be one of those things that you either love or hate. You either connect with them, or you don't. The first time I watched "The Sheik," I was instantly smitten, falling head over heels in love.

Silent movies are a whole different ball game than the type of movies today's society is used to. The lack of a soundtrack required the viewer to pay more attention to the facial expressions and body language of the actors in order to interpret and understand the story unfolding before them. Title cards helped as well, providing the viewer with dialogue as well as descriptions of events. Music helped to pull it all together, prompting us to laugh, or cry, depending on the scene at hand. Through this interaction, The viewer in turn became much more involved, drawing upon her own well of imagination to fill in the gaps.

With the advent of "talkies," one can only imagine how shocked people must have been to hear their favorite actors speak for the very first time. The advent of sound was the death knell for this fleeting golden age, and for many of the actors as well.


"The Sheik"

"The Sheik"

"The Son of the Sheik"

"The Son of the Sheik"

Charlie Chaplin in The Gold Rush

"The Gold Rush" movie poster

"The Gold Rush" movie poster

"The Gold Rush," released in 1925, is the film Chaplin most wanted to be remembered for. Chaplin produced, directed, and starred in this silent comedy playing his famous Little Tramp character, who travels to the Yukon to take part in the Klondike Gold Rush.

After a bad storm, the Tramp ends up stranded in a cabin with two prospectors: Big Jim (Mack Swain) and Black Larson (Tom Murray). In need of food, they draw cards. Black Larson, who draws the lowest, must go for food. On the way, a couple of prospectors recognize him as a wanted man and try to run him in, but he shoots them both. He then returns to the cabin and tries to steal Jim's gold deposit. The two men fight, and Big Jim is knocked out by a blow to the head, resulting in amnesia, while Black Larson falls off a cliff to his death.

The Tramp enters a prospecting town, taking on the job of looking after another prospector's cabin. He soon meets and falls in love with Georgia, a pretty dance hall girl (Georgia Hale), whom he mistakenly believes feels the same way about him. He invites Georgia and her friends to the cabin he is staying in for New Years Eve, and they accept. Unbeknownst to the Tramp, Georgia is merely toying with him for her amusement, and has no intention of showing up.

The Tramp begs, borrows, and shovels snow to get money to entertain his friends with food, decorations, and presents. When New Years Eve comes and Georgia doesn't show up, the Tramp searches for her in the dance hall, while at the same time, Georgia and her friends decide to have fun at his expense, showing up at the cabin he is watching. With the Tramp gone, Georgia finds the Tramp's presents, food, and decorations meant for her and her friends. She realizes that the Tramp is really in love with her, and suddenly, picking on the Tramp isn't fun anymore.

Big Jim, who has been wandering around with amnesia, runs into the Tramp, suddenly recognizing him. Jim is elated, promising to make the Tramp a millionaire if he will lead him to the cabin so he can find his gold deposit.

Will the Little Tramp help Big Jim find his claim? Will they become millionaires? And, most importantly--will he get the girl in the end? Watch the movie to find out.

In 1942, the Gold Rush was re-released with a new musical score, which Chaplin composed himself. Some plot points were changed and narration was added. The film was the first of Chaplin's films to be converted to a sound version in this fashion.

Read About Filming the Gold Rush

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"The Gold Rush" movie poster

"The Gold Rush" movie poster

My Favorite Chaplin Movie

The Gold Rush is my favorite Chaplin movie. I enjoy all the kooky gags, such as the Tramp turning into a chicken (when Big Jim is starving for a meal), the roll dance, and the see-sawing cabin. My favorite part, though, is when the Tramp, believing that Georgia is sincere about showing up New Years Day, works hard to make a special New Years for her and her friends. He buys presents for them, cooks, decorates, and lovingly sets the table for them, then no one shows up. The Tramp's look of dejection breaks your heart!

Watch Charlie Chaplin in The Gold Rush

The Gold Rush has something for everyone: action, suspense, humor, sentiment, and love. Enjoy the riveting performance of none other than the great Charlie Chaplin!

Our Dancing Daughters with Joan Crawford and John Mack Brown--The Quintessential Flapper Movie!

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I bet you didn't know that Joan Crawford was the quintessential flapper back during the roaring twenties. I love her in the silents--her eyes are so expressive, and she's a fabulous dancer, to boot! I particularly love the opening scene in Our Dancing daughters when Joan as Diana Medford is cutting a rug while getting dressed. Talk about fabulous footwork!

Our Dancing Daughters, from 1928, is an American silent drama film about the declining morals of youth during the 1920s. The film stars Joan Crawford and John Mack Brown. Produced by Hunt Stromburg and directed by Harry Beaumont, the film made Joan Crawford a major star.

Diana falls hard for Ben Blaine (John Mack Brown), but her friend Ann (Anita Page) not only seduces him away from Diana, she gets Ben to marry her. It turns out Ann isn't in love with Ben--she only married him for his money. Soon afterward, Ann flaunts her lover Freddie (Edward J. Nugent) at Diana's party. Ben, who secretly attends the party, discovers the worst. An argument ensues, and an extremely intoxicated Ann ends up falling down the stairs to her death. Will the now free Ben reconcile with Diana? Watch the movie and find out.

Joan Crawford in "Our Dancing Daughters"

Joan Crawford in "Our Dancing Daughters"

Joan Crawford and John Mack Brown in "Our Dancing Daughters"

Joan Crawford and John Mack Brown in "Our Dancing Daughters"

Our Dancing Daughters Videos

Although the full movie isn't available on YouTube, I found some great clips that highlight some of the best moments in the movie.

The Crowd with James Murray and Eleanor Boardman, 1928

"The Crowd"

"The Crowd"

December 9, 2012

Last night, Turner Classic Movies (TCM) showed the silent classic from 1928, "The Crowd," for their "Silent Sunday" feature. The Crowd, directed by King Vidor, and starring Vidor's wife, Eleanor Boardman, is one of my favorite silent movies of all time. Although I'm used to going to bed fairly early due to my work schedule, I braved the late hours and stayed up to watch it. Unfortunately, I found myself nodding off a few times, but not because the movie is boring. Lol!

Here is a quick run-down of the movie: From the moment of his birth (the fourth of July), great things are expected of John Sims (James Murray). His father, who dies when John is twelve, has no doubt that his son will grow up to be important person.

At the age of 21, John leaves for New York City on a mission to become important. He gets a job at Atlas Insurance Company, becoming a small fish in a huge pond. Bert (Bert Roach), a fellow worker, introduces John to a girl named Mary (Eleanor Boardman), whom he quickly falls for. The couple soon marry, honeymooning in Niagara Falls. The marriage gets off to a rocky start; the couple quarrel and Mary leaves. When Mary discovers she is pregnant, the couple reconcile.

The next five years of marriage produces a daughter, and an $8 raise. Mary hounds John about his lack of advancement in his job, especially compared to Bert. Things finally begin looking John's way when he wins $500 in with an advertising slogan. John happily buys gifts for the family, but the joy is short lived. As he and Mary call to the children to hurry home for their gifts, their little daughter is run over by a truck. In critical condition, she dies.

John, devastated by the loss of his child, is unable to concentrate on his job. Berated by the boss for his poor performance, he quits his job. John gets other jobs, but loses them, one after another. Finally, Mary's brothers reluctantly offer John a position, but he turns them down, refusing to accept a "charity job." When a furious and fed-up Mary slaps John, he goes for a walk, contemplating suicide. But his little son has joined him in his walk. Will John self-destruct with his son in tow? Or will his beloved son be just the therapy he needs? Watch the movie and find out.

I'll be so glad when a properly remastered and restored edition of The Crowd comes on the market. Until then, I'll be patiently waiting. . . .


Metropolis--One of the Greatest Movies of All Time!

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"Metropolis," released in 1927, and directed by Fritz Lang, is a German expressionist science-fiction film. The movie stars: Brigitte Helm, Gustav Frohlich, Rudolf Klein-Rogge, and Alfred Abel. The script for the film was written by Lang and his wife, Thea Von Harbou.

Set in a futuristic urban dystopia in 2026, this movie brings to mind ancient Egypt, where the workers endured hideous working conditions. The workers in this movie endure the same plight, only now they are ruled by powerful men in towering city complexes, while the opressed workers are relegated to live and work in the unforgiving depths below.

Freder (Gustav Frohlich), who lives a pampered life, is the son of Joh Frederson (Alfred Abel), the ruthless founder and ruler of Metropolis. While frolicking in his pampered paradise, he encounters Maria (Brigitte Helm), who rises from the depths with the children of the workers, so that they may look upon their "brothers."

Freder is intrigued with Maria, descending down into the depths of the worker's city to find her. When he witnesses several workers become injured after a huge machine explodes, Freder vows to help the opressed workers. When he informs his father of the tragedy, rather than being concerned about the workers, Joh is instead angered that Freder has entered the worker's city, where he doesn't belong. Incensed that he had to learn about the explosion from his son rather than his assistant, Josephat (Theodor Loos), Joh fires Josephat. Outside the office, Freder stops a devastated Josaphat from committing suicide, instructing him to return to his apartment and await his return.

Angered over his son's behavior, Joh sends his henchman, The Thin Man (Fritz Rasp), to tail Freder. Freder, in the meantime, descends into the depths of the worker's city, where he encounters a man, Georgy (Erwin Biswanger) collapsing at his post. Freder takes over the grateful man's job, switching clothes with him and inviting him to stay at Josephat's apartment. Freder offers Georgy the use of his car and chaufffer. On the way to the apartment, Georgy, distracted by the bright lights of the Yoshiwara (a licentious nightclub), goes inside, where he ends up staying all night.

When Joh discovers a paper with secret plans shared by the workers, he takes it to an old collaborator and scientist, Rotwang (Rudolf Klein-Rogge), who discerns that the diagrams are maps to tunnels in the underground city. Rotwang, who was in love with Joh's deceased wife, Hel, drops a big bomb: he shows Joh a robot he is constructing in a deranged tribute to Hel.

Exhausted and hallucinating after manning Georgy's post, Freder enters the catacombs to hear Maria speak. Freder is captivated by Maria, who prophesizes a mediator between workers and rulers--a heart to join the head (rulers) and hands (workers). Freder, who declares his love for Maria, plans to meet her later at a cathedral. Joh and Rotwang, unknown to Maria and Freder, are lurking in the shadows and hear everything. The two plot to kidnap Maria and give the robot her face in order to discredit her. Unknown to Joh, Rotwang is actually devising an evil plot to use the robot with Maria's face to destroy his son, Freder.

When Georgy returns to the car, after a night of partying at the Yoshiwara, The Thin Man lies in wait, where he steals the instructions to Josephat's apartment from him, and orders Georgy back to his job, threatening him to keep quiet about everything. In the meantime, Freder enters Josephat's apartment looking for Georgy. Josephat, who is still there, tells him that Georgy hasn't arrived yet. Freder relays to Josephat his experiences in the worker's city. Just as Freder is leaving to meet Maria, The Thin Man arrives, ordering him to leave Metropolis. The two fight, and Josephat manages to escape, descending into the worker's city.

When Maria is a no-show at the cathedral, Freder searches for her. Hearing her cries coming from Rotwang's house, he attempts to rescue her, but to no avail. Inside, the evil Rotwanger is in the process of fusing Maria's face and body with that of the robot. Upon completion, Rotwang sends the robot--now with Maria's face--to meet Joh. Freder catches them embracing, faints and becomes unconscious for ten days, experiencing nightmarish visions.

The Maria robot enters Yoshiwara. With her seductive dancing, she causes men to lust for her, pitting brother against brother. Unaware that what they're seeing isn't really Maria, the workers latch on to her every word. The false Maria unleashes havoc on the city, urging the workers to rise up and revolt.

Will the Maria robot lead the workers to destroy the city? Will the real Maria escape and intervene to save the city? Who will be the mediator between the workers and rulers? Watch the movie and find out. . . .

my-love-affair-with-silent-movies
my-love-affair-with-silent-movies
my-love-affair-with-silent-movies
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The Complete Metropolis Trailer

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The Complete Metropolis DVD

I own the restored Metropolis, and it's incredible! Not only for its amazing cinematography, but also for the story, the acting, and the beautiful musical score! This is the quintessential silent movie that everyone must see!

Metropolis was one of the first silent movies that I acquired on DVD. Unfortunately, that first version was missing 25 minutes of footage, which really compromized the story line. Although I still enjoyed watching the movie, it didn't really make a whole lot of sense.

Shortly after Metropolis was released in 1927, due to its long running time and footage that sensors found questionable, the movie was brutally butchered. The beautiful musical score was replaced with music that didn't coincide with the movie at all. In other words, this beautiful masterpiece that Fritz Lang put his heart and soul into was destroyed. You can just imagine how devastated Lang was to witness this atrocity.

Now, after discovering a complete cut of the movie in Argentina in 2008, the movie has been restored to its original glory, the way it was meant to be seen. After I watched the restored version of Metropolis the first time, I said, "Ah--now I understand!" Now the movie makes perfect sense to me, and I'm completely bowled over by the addition of the original musical score by Gottfried Huppertz which was created for the film's 1927 Berlin debut.

If you buy just one silent movie in your lifetime, buy this one; I guarantee you won't be sorry.

Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans with George O'Brien and Janet Gaynor, 1927