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Who made the first movie?

LOUIS_LE_PRINCE1.

LOUIS_LE_PRINCE1.

Most moviegoers want to know who made the world's first movie. Thomas Edison and the Leo Meyer Brothers are generally credited with making the first action-packed film, but a new documentary released recently states that the world's first film was actually made in Leeds in 1888, but The filmmakers disappeared before their name could be seen in the history of cinema.
When famous distributors and filmmaker David Wilkinson travels to the US states of Hollywood, New York or Cannes, he says that he belongs to the city where the first film originated.
People who know him are confused by the fact that David Wilkinson's accent is not the same as that of the Americans, which shows that he belongs to Thomas Edison's birthplace and that he is not from Lumiere. Born in France. Then he says to clear the confusion of the people that I am actually from Leeds, England.

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Wilkinson says that in his 33 years in the film world, there may be few people who understand what he is saying and why Leeds, England, can be called or recognized as the birthplace of film. That Leeds is the land where the first film originated.
That was about 125 years ago today, on October 14, 1888, when a family gathered in a garden on the outskirts of Leeds, England. Among the members of this family was a man named Louis Le Prince, who had a strange wooden stick in his hand. The family included Louise's son, a friend and mother-in-law. Louis Lee told those around him to walk in a circle in front of the box. The box was actually Louis Le Prince's camera, and even today when we watch a small silent film on the Internet, it is actually the same film that was made at that time. Which shows that the film was made long before Edison and Lumiere stepped into the film world.
Wilkinson made a film entitled "The First Film" in which he called Lee Prince the inventor of moving pictures (the first moving film).
Tony Booth, an associate curator at the National Media Museum in Bradford, says there is strong evidence that Louis Lee Prince invented the first moving pictures. The museum houses Louis Le Prince's historic camera that made the world's first silent film, as well as footage.
Tony Booth adds that if you look at the mechanism or the way this camera works, it is very similar to the cameras that follow the motion picture. Louis Lee Prince made the world's first silent film with the same camera, but before he could become famous, he disappeared.

Louis Lee Prince filmed with this camera, but before he could make a name for himself, he disappeared.

Louis Lee Prince filmed with this camera, but before he could make a name for himself, he disappeared.


It's a movie roll that rotates from shutter to shutter and takes pictures in a sequence that is later rendered in such a way that they appear to move.
Tony Booth says that from the thing that records live action moving images, I can say that Louis Le Prince was the first person to do it.
Louis Lee Prince first developed a 16-lens camera for his silent film, but later developed a single-lens camera.
Louis Le Prince was born in the northeastern French city of Metz. After studying chemistry and physics at the university, he began working as a painter and photographer, after which he was offered a job by John Whitley, an engineering company in Leeds, which Lee Prince accepted and joined the company.
During this time he met Elizabeth Whitley, the daughter of the owner of the same company. At first the meeting turned into a friendship and then the two felt that the relationship should be turned into a serious relationship so that they could be together for life. Lee Prince had been working at Leeds for three years. He then decided to marry Elizabeth Whitley, and the two became engaged. It was at this time that photography became commonplace in the world and Louis Lee Prince began experimenting with moving images.
By 1880, Prince Louis Lee had joined the ranks of those working on motion picture technology, which came to be known as "film."
As I mentioned earlier, Louis Lee Prince first developed a 16-lens camera, but then he developed a single-lens camera, which he used to film garden scenes and people on the Leeds Bridge.? He successfully filmed moving pictures but unfortunately the world did not know about his invention because no one had seen this invention.
Louis Le Prince enjoyed his experiences for two consecutive years. He was about to go for a public screening in New York City in 1890 when he suddenly disappeared. All that was known from some sources was that Louis Le Prince had to catch a train from Dijon to Paris with two of his friends, but after that where he went, no one knew anything and no one ever saw him again.
Many speculations circulated about the death of Louis Lee Prince. His own wife, Lizzie (Elizabeth), claimed that her husband had been killed by Edison so that no one but Edison could be credited with the success of the invention of the moving image.
Some believe that Louis Lee Prince committed suicide because he was almost bankrupt. Some people say that he deliberately disappeared and started his life in another corner of the world. There is also speculation that he was killed by his brother Albert over a property dispute. Some believe that when Louis Lee Prince's family found out he was gay, they forced him to leave so that his family would not be disgraced. To survive

Standing with Lee Prince's camera, David Wilkinson says he is overwhelmed by the story.

Standing with Lee Prince's camera, David Wilkinson says he is overwhelmed by the story.

David Wilkinson says with conviction that if Louis Lee Prince had not disappeared, I can say with confidence that the world's first moving film was shown in Newark. I am also sure that he would have collected enough money from the audience that he could have started mass production of this film with this huge amount of money. Louis Lee Prince would certainly have done what his successors Edison and Lumiere did, but he would have done it before him and thus snatched the honor of making the first film from Edison and Lumiere and making the first move in history. He could have registered with the invention of pictures (film).
Louis Le Prince's granddaughter Larry Snyder writes in her memoirs that many assumptions have been circulating in my family regarding the death or disappearance of Louis Le Prince and still do today. Some believe Edison had no hand in Lee Prince's death or disappearance, while some in the family believe he disappeared out of fear. He thought he had missed his first train to Paris and had to take the second train to Paris, which arrived at 11 pm. From there, Lee Prince would have hired a taxi to go to the workshop.
Larry Snyder also denies the allegation that Lee Prince was killed by his brother. She also dismisses the notion that her family forced Louis Lee Prince to go into hiding or elsewhere after finding out about homosexuality because her family wanted to find Lee Prince. It cost a lot of money and time.
Larry Snyder believes that taking advantage of the darkness, the driver may have taken them away and hit them with a sharp or heavy object on the head and thrown them into the Seine River, as squares were often looted by lone passengers in those days. And during resistance to looting, they severely injured or even killed passengers.
All I can say about Louis Lee Prince's death or disappearance is ... "He was in the wrong place at the wrong time."

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