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The Extreme Court of the United States Should Embrace These Beatles Songs

Let Me Introduce To You, The Extreme Court of the United States

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Given the recent decisions made by the United States Judicial Branch, it is a shame that the voting public cannot change the members of that nonet. What could be changed, easily enough, is its name.

Since there is nothing supreme about this federal court of far-right wing judges, I suggest it now be referred to as the Extreme Court. The adjective supreme should be used for entities that are superior, when compared to others in their field.

For example, in the world of music, you could easily label the adjective supreme on a handful of bands or artists. At the top of the list would of course be Bob Dylan, ranking behind just one other name.

With apologies to Diana Ross and her mates in the most famous R & B trio, the word supreme best fits with The Beatles. The Fab Four has ruled the music world for sixty years now, and many of their songs could be adapted to fit the current state of the Judicial Branch of the United States.

1. “The Six of Us”

Just a third of that total was used to kick off the Let It Be album, but the half-dozen conservative judges are imposing their beliefs on issues that a clear majority of Americans oppose.

2. “You Can't Do That. . . or That. . . or That. . .”

The heartless half-dozen in their decisions have told everyone what they cannot do, such as women controlling their own bodies or the states controlling their own gun legislation or the EPA trying to save the earth.

3. “Happiness Is a Warm Gun Lobby”

Speaking of guns, this classic from The White Album with the addition of just one word sums up the Extreme Court's goal in its recent decision against New York.

4. “I'm Gonna Hold Your Hand”

While John and Paul were pleading for the female's acquiescence, the Extreme Court (on the other hand) is demanding it.

5. “Here Comes the Gun”

George Harrison's Abbey Road hit represented hope which, because of the Extreme Court and its recent defeat of gun restrictions, Americans have little of. Unlike George back in '69, we can't say “It's all right.”

6. “Stopping the Wheels”

After quitting the game for a half decade Lennon on Double Fantasy was enjoying watching as progress rolled by, progress which the Extreme Court is determined to bring to a halt.

7. “Mother Nature's Done”

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By ruling against and thereby limiting the Environmental Protection Agency, the Extreme Court is basically bidding adieu to our planet. Sir Paul should be heartbroken to see what one little word has done to his lovely ballad from The White Album.

8. “Why Don't We Do It To Roe?”

It did not take long for the Extreme Court to answer this question based on a title from The White Album, for the Roe decision was overturned in a matter of weeks.

9. “Listen To What the Man (Not the Woman) Says”

America's justices seem intent on taking rights away from women, thereby making them as dependent on men as they were when the country was founded over two hundred years ago.

10. “Being for the Benefit of Mr. Right Wing!”

Mr. Kite was having a carnival with a trampoline, but trampling on rights seems be the main stunt of the Court's Conservative Clowns.

11. “Digging a Hole”

McCartney sang on Sargent Pepper about fixing a hole to prevent rain, while the Extreme Court is making a grave for the country.

12. “I'm Happy Just To Trample You”

To dance with you was the original goal of this song, whose verb has been sadly altered by the recent decisions of the right wing bullies.

13. “Dear Clarence”

Unlike Lennon's plea for the sister of Mia Farrow in the White Album track, I will not bother to beg Justice Thomas to “come out and play.

14. "We Dig A. Coney"

Because her views are as right-wing as a quintet of her fellow jurists, Amy Coney Barrett is loved by those other five fogies much more than George dug his pony on Let It Be.

15. "Hey Judge"

It's too late to plead “Don't make it bad” or “take a sad song and make it better.” Nah, nah, nah, nah nah nah.


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