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Stolen Moments: A Pictorial Essay of the Greatest Jazz Giants of our Times

Author:

The Old Jazz Cats....

Monk at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1964.

Monk at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1964.

Monk wistfully waltzing around the studio. This picture of Monk listening to the playback was taken around 1962 or 1963.

Monk wistfully waltzing around the studio. This picture of Monk listening to the playback was taken around 1962 or 1963.

Monk at the Columbia Records' recording studio, New York, 1963.

Monk at the Columbia Records' recording studio, New York, 1963.

Monk photographed for a Saturday Evening Post Feature in 1963, and Monk is sitting next to his piano dressed in a silk robe.

Monk photographed for a Saturday Evening Post Feature in 1963, and Monk is sitting next to his piano dressed in a silk robe.

Arranger and Composer Gil Evans at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1966; Evans was warming up in a large rehearsal hall backstage.

Arranger and Composer Gil Evans at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1966; Evans was warming up in a large rehearsal hall backstage.

Bill Evans at a Riverside Records record session, New York,1963.

Bill Evans at a Riverside Records record session, New York,1963.

Miles Davis in his New York City apartment. 1963.

Miles Davis in his New York City apartment. 1963.

Miles Davis having a cigarette lit by Harry James on the backstage at the Monterey Jazz Festival 1963.

Miles Davis having a cigarette lit by Harry James on the backstage at the Monterey Jazz Festival 1963.

Al Cohn behind a club, New York City, 1963.

Al Cohn behind a club, New York City, 1963.

Chico Hamilton at a Rudy Van Gelder's studio recording session for Impulse!, New York City, 1963.

Chico Hamilton at a Rudy Van Gelder's studio recording session for Impulse!, New York City, 1963.

Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, and Gerald Wilspn backstage at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1963.

Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, and Gerald Wilspn backstage at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1963.

Oscar Peterson backstage at the Las Vegas Festival, 1962.

Oscar Peterson backstage at the Las Vegas Festival, 1962.

Miles Davis talking sh**t, probably about some chick, to Steve McQueen backstage at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1963.

Miles Davis talking sh**t, probably about some chick, to Steve McQueen backstage at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1963.

Hank Crawford backstage with a lady friend at the Oakland Coliseum, 1960.

Hank Crawford backstage with a lady friend at the Oakland Coliseum, 1960.

Percy Heath at the Coffee Gallery, San Francisco, 1960.

Percy Heath at the Coffee Gallery, San Francisco, 1960.

Chares Lloyd in a serene mood in his apartment, New York, 1964.

Chares Lloyd in a serene mood in his apartment, New York, 1964.

Ben Webster at the Five Spot on 8th Street in New York City, taken on a Sunday afternoon jam session in 1963.

Ben Webster at the Five Spot on 8th Street in New York City, taken on a Sunday afternoon jam session in 1963.

John Coltrane t Rudy Van Gelder's studio in New York, during the ABC Records' session for Impulse!, in 1963. He was listening to the playback of "Nancy with the Laughing Face."

John Coltrane t Rudy Van Gelder's studio in New York, during the ABC Records' session for Impulse!, in 1963. He was listening to the playback of "Nancy with the Laughing Face."

Rahsaan Roland Kirk and Pearl Bailey at the Las Vegas Jazz Festival.

Rahsaan Roland Kirk and Pearl Bailey at the Las Vegas Jazz Festival.

Dinah Washington at the Masonaic Auditorium, San Francisco, 1959.

Dinah Washington at the Masonaic Auditorium, San Francisco, 1959.

Helen Humes at the Jazz Workshop, San Francisco, 1959 or 1960.

Helen Humes at the Jazz Workshop, San Francisco, 1959 or 1960.

Al gray at Russ Wilson's home, San Francisco, 1961.

Al gray at Russ Wilson's home, San Francisco, 1961.

Blue  Mitchell at the Black Hawk, San Francisco,1960.

Blue Mitchell at the Black Hawk, San Francisco,1960.

Doug Watkins the Bass player at the Jazz Workshop, San Francisco.

Doug Watkins the Bass player at the Jazz Workshop, San Francisco.

Johnny Hodges at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1960.

Johnny Hodges at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1960.

John Coltrane taken at the home of Ralph Gleason, the late Chronicle jazz critic in 1960.

John Coltrane taken at the home of Ralph Gleason, the late Chronicle jazz critic in 1960.

Sarah Vaughn at the Cow Palace, San Francisco, late 1980s.

Sarah Vaughn at the Cow Palace, San Francisco, late 1980s.

Frank Morgan at the UC Jazz Festival, Berkeley, 1980s, 1980s.

Frank Morgan at the UC Jazz Festival, Berkeley, 1980s, 1980s.

Woody Herman at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1966 or 1967.

Woody Herman at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1966 or 1967.

Sonny Rollins and Donald Byrd at the Great American Music Hall, San Francisco, early 1980s.

Sonny Rollins and Donald Byrd at the Great American Music Hall, San Francisco, early 1980s.

Michel Petruciani at Ken Schuberts house in the late 1980s. Michel was  dwarf and an incredible piano player. He accessed the pedals by placing blocks on them.

Michel Petruciani at Ken Schuberts house in the late 1980s. Michel was dwarf and an incredible piano player. He accessed the pedals by placing blocks on them.

Miles Davis at Newman's Gym on Leavenworth Street in San Francsco, 1970.

Miles Davis at Newman's Gym on Leavenworth Street in San Francsco, 1970.

Miriam Makeba at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1960 singing "Evolution of the Blues. She had just come from South Africa.

Miriam Makeba at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1960 singing "Evolution of the Blues. She had just come from South Africa.

Mingus at the UC Jazz Festival at the greek Theater, Berkeley, 1966.

Mingus at the UC Jazz Festival at the greek Theater, Berkeley, 1966.

Elvin Jones at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1966.

Elvin Jones at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1966.

Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway in 1972, in Berkeley.

Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway in 1972, in Berkeley.

Quincy Jones and Peggy Lipton backstage at the Duke Ellington tribute at CBS TV studios, Los Angeles, 1972

Quincy Jones and Peggy Lipton backstage at the Duke Ellington tribute at CBS TV studios, Los Angeles, 1972

Zoot Sims chatting with Stan Getz during the intermission in 1963.

Zoot Sims chatting with Stan Getz during the intermission in 1963.

King Curtis at an Aretha Franklin recording Session  in either New York or Los Angeles. He was killed by being stabbed whilst trying to stop a fight between two Puerto Rican men.                                                   .

King Curtis at an Aretha Franklin recording Session in either New York or Los Angeles. He was killed by being stabbed whilst trying to stop a fight between two Puerto Rican men. .

Vernon Alley at Steve Hathaway's studio in San Francisco, late 1990s.

Vernon Alley at Steve Hathaway's studio in San Francisco, late 1990s.

Cootie Williams, Count Basie, and Billy Eckstine, backstage at the Duke Ellington tribute, CBS TV studios, Los Angeles, 1972.

Cootie Williams, Count Basie, and Billy Eckstine, backstage at the Duke Ellington tribute, CBS TV studios, Los Angeles, 1972.

Jackie McLean at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1966.

Jackie McLean at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1966.

Mingus at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1964.

Mingus at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1964.

Sonny Rollins at the Great American Music Hall, San Francisco, early 1990s.

Sonny Rollins at the Great American Music Hall, San Francisco, early 1990s.

Stanley Turrentine at the Great American Hall, San Francisco, early 1980s.

Stanley Turrentine at the Great American Hall, San Francisco, early 1980s.

Teddy Edwards at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1964.

Teddy Edwards at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1964.

Anita O'Day, San Francisco, 1960.

Anita O'Day, San Francisco, 1960.

Carmen Mcrae in the dressing room, in the basement and was recording a live Album with Dizy Gillespie at the Great American Music Hall in San Fancisco, 1976.

Carmen Mcrae in the dressing room, in the basement and was recording a live Album with Dizy Gillespie at the Great American Music Hall in San Fancisco, 1976.

Sammy Davis Jr. backstage at the Duke Ellington tribute at CBS TV, Los Angeles, 1972.

Sammy Davis Jr. backstage at the Duke Ellington tribute at CBS TV, Los Angeles, 1972.

Sonny Payne at the Longshoremans Hall, San Francisco, 1960.

Sonny Payne at the Longshoremans Hall, San Francisco, 1960.

Miles Backstage at the Berkeley Community Theater, 1971.

Miles Backstage at the Berkeley Community Theater, 1971.

Joe Williams, San Francisco, 1961 or 1962.

Joe Williams, San Francisco, 1961 or 1962.

Chuck Isreal at the Village Gate, New York City, 1961.

Chuck Isreal at the Village Gate, New York City, 1961.

Duke Ellington at the  Monterey Jazz Festival, 1966.

Duke Ellington at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1966.

McCoy Tyner at the Newport Jazz Festival, 1963.

McCoy Tyner at the Newport Jazz Festival, 1963.

Dave Brubeck backstage at the New Port Jazz Festival, 1963.

Dave Brubeck backstage at the New Port Jazz Festival, 1963.

Miles at Winterland, San francisco, 1971.

Miles at Winterland, San francisco, 1971.

Duke Ellington and Paul Gonsalves at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1960. The photo was taken during one of Paul's extended solos.

Duke Ellington and Paul Gonsalves at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1960. The photo was taken during one of Paul's extended solos.

Louie Bellson at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1966

Louie Bellson at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1966

Miles in the Ring at Newman's Gym in San Francisco in 1971. Miles used to box with guys and he would say, "Don't hit me in the mouth, I gotta play tonight."

Miles in the Ring at Newman's Gym in San Francisco in 1971. Miles used to box with guys and he would say, "Don't hit me in the mouth, I gotta play tonight."

Rashid Booker from New York, New York on December 21, 2014: The Great African-American Classical Art-Form

The Beginning of The Great Art-Form; Be –bop

The Rashid Project ~ Be-bop (1940-1955) — with Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie in New York, New York Bop style of so-called jazz, was sometimes called bebop or rebop, but common usage shortened it to bop. One explanation for the name is that players sang the words bebop and rebop when vocalizing their new way of phrasing.

Developed between the early and mid-1940s - "bebop" expanded upon many of the improvisational elements of the swing era. Young musicians including Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Bud Powell, and Thelonious Monk, influenced by the innovative compositions of soloists of the swing era (e.g., Art Tatum, Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young) began exploring more advanced harmonies, altered chords, and chord substitutions.

Important Factors:

* A revolutionary style changed from swing era of so-called jazz.

* Inspired by the most advanced swing styles.

* A new vocabulary of musical phrases and methods of matching improvisation to chord progressions.

* Mastery of this style is considered the foundation for competence as a so-called jazz improviser to this day.

The Climate of Change

A combination of social and economic events helped to usher in bebop era. As World War II ultimately drafted many of the veteran musicians needed for the popular big bands of the swing era, many teenagers too young to be drafted were instead enlisted into the ranks of the touring road bands. Young musicians like Gillespie and Parker, as well as Stan Getz and Red Rodney, developed their craft at an early age by working with established swing masters.

There were hundreds of big bands and although a few played so-called jazz, such as Ellington, Basie and Goodman - others played none. This stimulated a need for the so-called jazz artist to find a new means, beyond the big band, for development. In New York City, many afterhours’ clubs became breeding grounds for small group explorations, especially in Harlem. Clubs like Minton's Playhouse witnessed the development of this new music by bebop innovators including guitarist Charlie Christian, bassist Jimmy Blanton, and pianist Thelonious Monk.

A different social climate existed for the Generation of African-American musicians born around 1920. The 1930's saw a growing consciousness among whites, especially on the political left that in a democracy African-Americans could not be treated as second-class citizens.

Unlike the disrespect so-called jazz musicians received in previous years, by 1940, music critics were calling so-called jazz musicians artists who were worthy of respect. T

his resulted in the development of a strong distaste by young African-American so-called jazz artist for the show-biz antics associated with commercial music and turning away from the swing style of the big bands whose commercial tendencies made it suspect.

However, this was not a reaction against the true so-called jazz artists of the swing era, but it was a catalyst to further the development of the musical language.

The war also forced cut backs in dance halls and cabarets due to the Government issued the Cabaret tax, which collected money from any nightclub or restaurant which permitted dancing.

Due to these issues and the fact that in the 1940's the United States was entering a war; there was more tension in the music of this era than in the music of the swing era. So-Called jazz, as well as the other arts, has always been influenced by the mood of the times. The musical tension was created by tonal clashes, unusual harmonies, and fast tempos with complex rhythms.

Sight And Knowledge

WAYS OF SEEING

Seeing comes before words. The child looks and recognizes before it can speak. But there is also another sense in which seeing comes before words. It is seeing which establishes our place in the surrounding world; we explain that world with words, but words can never undo the fact that we are surrounded by it. The relation between what we see and what we know is never settled.

Each evening we see the sun set. We know that the earth is turning away from it. Yet knowledge, the explanation, never quite fits the sight. The way we see things is affected by what we know or what we believe. When in love, the sight of the beloved has a wholeness which no words and no embrace can match: a totality in which only the act of making love can temporarily accommodate.

Yet this seeing which comes before words, and can never be quite covered by them, is not a question of mechanically reacting to stimuli. We only see what we look at. To look is an act of choice. As a result of this act, what we see is brought within our reach - though not necessarily within arm's reach. To touch something is to situate oneself in relation to it. We never look at just one thing; we are always looking at the relation between things and ourselves.

Our vision is continually active, continually moving, continually holding things in a circle around itself, constituting what is present as we are. An image is a sight which has been recreated or reproduced. It is an appearance, or a set of appearances, which has been detached from the place and time in which it first made its appearance and preserved - for a few moments or a few centuries. Every image embodies a way of seeing. Even a photograph.

For photographs are not, as is often assumed, a mechanical record. Every time we look at a photograph, we are aware, however slightly, of the photographer selecting that sight from an infinity of other possible sights. This is true even in the most casual family snapshot.

The photographer's way of seeing is reflected in his choice of the subject. The painter's way of seeing is reconstituted by the marks he makes on the canvas or paper. Yet, although every image embodies a way of seeing, our perception or apprectation of an image depends also upon our own way of seeing. (Berger)

When we look and see the photographs above, many memories are recalled and recollected. The music and the musician assume a recognizable but unusual posture and memory down the Jazz memory lane captured in time and space. The subject may have as well have passed on, but their physical appearances make us remember the music, their acts and soulful renderings.

The photographic essays conforms to the adage that Jazz massages the soul as do the pictures create a halo on Jazz and Jazz musicians. The way we see the photos above is what Jazz is and has always been about. It brings back the LPs one has been listening to, the Live performances these Artists engaged in, and sumptuous studio recordings to bear. Seeing the photos not only brings the memories closer and keeps them fresh.

it also etches the music in ones consciousness and soulful self at peace and one with nature, the universe, cosmos and they rhythms of all life. The images are encrypted into the musical world and existence that they help us keep the spirit of Jazz alive and continuing throughout time and ages.

All the photos above were taken by Jim Marshall using his Leica M4. He was able to take these photos despite the bulwark of ushers, burly guards, stage managers, and concert impresarios' efforts to dissuade him from photographing the musicians and he never just took to standing but the stages lip waiting for shots to appear.

Most of these pictures were taken in recording studios, rehearsal halls, backstage areas, festival grounds, or home living rooms, and a few of them were of the artists performing on stage. His photos display his uncanny ability to capture the mood, personality and should of an Artist and this translated into stolen moments rarely witnessed by the legions of fans who love and follow Jazz. He was also able to capture and radiate with this informal, friendly intimacy - wherein in the end, they are like family snapshots.

He would crawl through the Big-Bands sections, or capture a tight close-up facial of an artist whilst they were playing. Marshall's love of hanging out with Jazz musicians provided him with opportunities to photograph them not only informally, out of the spotlight, but also to receive their blessing to shoot them at will in performance. He had a knack for capturing reflective moods. Marshall's close relationships with the Jazz crowd got him Pictures the like of which no one else could have taken.

Jazz-African Notes

Jazz and Modern Black Culture in South Africa

It is interesting to read Playthell’s article, “An Evening with Edward Kennedy Ellington;” it got me thinking of life in the Ghetto of Soweto, in South Africa. The Townships might not have had the architectural wonders of New York and its chic urbane life-style, but, Duke still affected and influenced the life, music and self-esteem of Africans under Apartheid. There has long been a struggle against Apartheid by the indigene refuting the claim that we were uncouth and backward.

As the Township of Soweto expanded and grew, so did the music scene: the South African Jazz Scene. Some of the jazz groups had “American” as their names. There were Jazz big bands; the fashion of the day were Dobbs brim hats, Florsheim shoes – some two tone – double breasted jackets with broad lapels and the whole dress code as was worn by the Americans of the ’30s, 40s and 50s. I guess what I am saying is that, because of the inhumanity of Apartheid we witnessed an oppressed people immerse themselves in the American Jazz music and African American culture, language and mannerism as a way of keeping our souls intact.

The sleeve jackets of the LPs were the point of discussions from the Shebeens – Taverns/Speak Easies – of the day. Discussion about music, styles, musical signatures of The “Duke”, the “Count”, Hodges, Archie Shepp, Philly Jo Jones(some People even renamed themselves after their favorite artist here in Mzantsi), Coltrane, Monk, Miles, Bessie Smith, Sonny Rollins, Stitt, Sidney Betchet, Stachmo, Jelly roll Morton, Fats Waller, Charlie Parker, Ida Cox, Lucille Hegamin, Rosa Henderson, Bertha “Chippie” Hill, Sara Martin, Trixie Smith, Lizzie Miles, Sarah Vaughn, Mahalia Jackson, Mamie Smith, Josie Miles, Edna Benbow HIcks, Eartha Kitt, Mae Harris, Lulla Miller, jimmy Lunceford, Billie Holiday, Etta James, Charlie Christian, Ron Carter, Yusef Lateef, Ella Fritzgerald, Scot Joplin, and a host of other many American musicians-too numerous to list here.

The American Jazz idiom was dominating thoroughly and completely here in Mzantsi. How do I know all these name of all these musicians. Well, as kids in the early sixties, we would sit with our Uncles and fathers and hear them argue and debate that was the best on drums, saxophones, composition and arrangements, and passions would rise to pitch level.

There were people who never thought of other artist as deserving mention or to be listened to because they did not meet their standard of what was Jazz or the like. So as we grew up in the late sixties, we were exposed to a variety of different artists of this American genre. Well, in most cases, my generation was scoffed-at by our old timers for not listening to real and classic Jazz when we listened to Jimmy Smith, John Patton, Harold Mabern, Blue Mitchell, Lou Donaldson, Billy Cobham, Booker T., Soul Music and funk.

We were ridiculed by these stalwarts and keepers of the Old Jazz, as me and my peers referred to Classical jazz as “not listening to Jazz,” and knowing nothing about it. But today, with most of them gone, and many of those who survived apartheid – the old timers I referred to above – have formed Jazz Clubs here in South Africa. They meet on weekends and bring out their best collection and spend the whole day listening to jazz, eating and imbibing large amounts of alcohol; also, dressed to kill.

And whilst engaging in this celebration of jazz here in Mzantsi, you would hear talk like Playthell’s, whom I will cite below, as being what was said about these musicians by our elders. Most of the other stuff was learned and read from the LP liner notes by some Jazz critic or aficionado, and From Down Beat Magazine and so forth. It would go something like this passage from Playthell’s essay:

“Some of these people had crossed an ocean to attend the concert earlier in the day. After a while, it was clear that several of the guests had seriously followed Duke’s work for thirty to forty years. … As Duke responded to requests and moved from one tune to another, I was impressed by the fact that most of these songs were now part of the standard repertoire of American music. … I wondered at the artistic sensibility that could conceive these elegant tone poems, based in sophisticated urban blues and surrounded by consistently inventive orchestrations…. ….When he composed his suites to various regions of the world he never wrote the music when he was in those places.

‘I don’t want to be overly influenced by the local musical traditions, so I always wait until I’m back home to write my impressions.’ And he also confessed to me after a few rounds of Champaign: ‘I’m a sophisticated savage.’ Before I could persuade him to elaborate on his colorful claim our conversation was disrupted by others demanding the attention of the great man. I understood and bowed out. That enchanted evening in July, 1974 demonstrates that rest the world has long recognized the extraordinary creative contribution of the Duke. It is long past time this prophet became s hero in his own land.”

To be honest, what Playthell wrote above would be taken by these Jazz aficionados, turned on its head, made theirs. And included in their folklore about Jazz, as if it was they who spun the yarn above, and had experienced it, so that they have a one-up on their fellow Jazz buffs.. But, with time, those with the means, have been visiting The Newport Jazz Festival, Montreux Festival, and many of those in Europe.. And they cameback with fantastic tales of their visits and so forth, today (Most of it exaggerated, somewhat, but with some kernel of Truth).

Today in South Africa, we have come a long from the days I described above.. People are not more able to listen to jazz without the pressures of apartheid dehumanizing us. But African American Jazz in South Africa made our lives more bearable and full of hope. We never gave the Boers a chance to tell us nor believed we were barbarians or savages.

Duke and the rest of the African America Jazz Masters, confirmed to us, since most of us looked like many of them and vice-versa- we knew that we were better than what the Apartheid monsters said we were.

There were many Jazz bands that were spawned as a result of our exposure to the American music scene and its Jazz Masters. These I might talk about in another palaver we might have on this subject. But Playthell’s article, with its cultural opulence and high art life-style, is still what makes our world go round. Duke and the rest of those in the pictures above were our demi-gods when it came to Jazz, Styles, dress/fashion, comportment and Class. They personified all this and then some to my uncles and their friends.

The Duke And Us Africans Of South Africa Here In Mzantsi

The world Duke and his musical contemporaries(As displayed in the pictorial essay above) created for us and in our imagination hope, and has been a source of encouragement and hope for us in the dark days of Apartheid. Many of us knew and believed that we were much more better than what Apartheid was telling us and make or force us to believe. His musical genius was our oxugen. From my father, Uncles and their friends, to my peers and maybe some beyond or younger than us, we have been collecting and listening to Duke and all the musical Masters of the American Jazz art-form shoed un the otitis above, and that made us feel superior.

My generation was born at the time when gramophones were the musical machines. Our uncles used to paly a lot of breakeable 78s rams on a spike-like need\le scratching on the spinning record. The speakers were one hollowed vent-like contraptions and it was constantly wound on the side to keep the rpm's going at an even keel. the dances and dancers were awesome for us, and the garb of the day marvelous. The ladies well well-adorned with pretty-flurry dresses, and toe-sticking low heels, and their well coiffered hair to go with-on tope, with their hats perched stylishly.

The gents were wearing broad brim hats, stylish sirts and ties or bow-tines, with their Florsheim two tone shoes twriling and sing, turning and dancing with the ladies, and this was a scene for us young ones of the times were marvelling at and being tutored about the music, dance, dress and of course, the Township slang to show how hip one is. We imbibed all that without let-up. Some of us were fortunate to have fathers who were big time and now legendary musicians of that era. So, listening to Duke and his musical contemporaries, they came to our understanding as a natural course of life.

Dukes Big band and or orchestra was fantastic, and it gelled with our life-styles. The life we were living under Apartheid was one part of our existence; our resistance and forging a life-style we knew was there, and we were not the ogres Apartheid made us to be-sophistication personified and lived, was our way of coping with the inhuman attrocities perpetrated against us.Seeing the immaculate and urbane looks of dukes garb, their photos invarious concerts and his, the grainy Black and White movies, from the silent type to the most even by today standards, were masterpiece videos that we were able to see as we grew older and kept up the listening patterns we grew up with.

Within and through the music of Duke and his musical contemporaries, we learned of many other artists; we also learnt how to distinguish each musican from their own style and signature phrasing or playing. Everyone who was on stage, we knew, and followed them as they managed, some of them, to eke out a body of work that expanded our musical horizons and understanding. That is how we came across Bebop, Avant grade, Afro/Soul/Funky Jazz, music from the Caribbeans, Latin America and the whole musical bit and sector/environment and genres.

As the musical components evolved from the gramophone to the cabinet box models, like Pilot Radio, Blaukpunckt and so forth, came into style. These, on their vinyl cubicle inside the cabinet, were designed to stack as much as 10 LPs, because around this time, more plastic and non-breakable vinyl was infused, and there was a steady movement away from the breakeable 78 rpm's types.

So, we began to have a constant LP play of ten without having to stand up and insert another LP. Some had inbuilt speakers on the side or elsewhere on the Cabinet, Radio and LP player. This was a serious and marked shift from the gramophone-and these used electricity, and not the manual winding of the gramophone.

All the while, LPs were arriving at our favorite record shops as we were now grown-up teenagers. Shop like Kohinoor and later others like the "Turntable", "Kohinor" and so forth, provided us with the latest music, and Duke featured prominently in our collection and he did so all over the world, and collaboration with various musicians in his band or elsewhere. Hs body of work can in fact be made into a College. School and so forth given the amount of it that is out there amongst our African people of Mzantsi.

As the 60s were come to a close, we began to see the emergence of what we got to know as Hi-Fi Stereo Radio- The components before then were playing on one-Now we were coming into the age of the Stereophonic sounds that one would be listening to..

Separate component became the new design. Two or four independent speakers, a separate tuner, graphic equalizer, booster, tape deck and now CD/DVD pieces, and then some. This was the time that we developed styles of DJ and listening to various genres that we could lay our hands on.

Whatever genre we partook in, we never forgot nor left Duke and his musical contemporaries alone. We listened to their various composition that we even knew them by heart; we could even and still mimick some of the solos and mind-blowing performances from many and various American Jazz giants, that one could even say that Duke lived in our Ghettoes, and we were part and pacel of his life and life-style. This was very significant for us under Apartheid, and The Duke made our miseries and oppression easy to bear.

I cannot write about nor pretend to know exactly how the life of Duke was like. That is why I have solicited the narrations of Playthell Benjamin whose style of writing is what I admire most.

He, Playthell, amongst his contemporaries, is well informed and keeps such topics fresh and real, and the bits of information he provides, is one way that this works out as a reminder to me and the life we lived under, through and with Duke and his music and lifestyle, which we read on the sleevess of the LP's jackets and other outlets and magazine like Downbeat Magazine and African Music And Drama Association-United Information Service(AMDA-USIS) Library in our Townships, which brought to us all available material they could muster for us to see and read.

What we got from the AMDA-USIS library were film reels of the Duke and many American big bands performances all over the the world; we saw many individual artist that we had on Vinyl/Lp's that kept us jamming and making ourselves better and feel better. One had access to some rare and serous books and authors, and magazines and so forth.

So that, as the technology of the musical players and machies evolved and morphed into the ithe i-Pods, the music, one has been working on the changing it from the LPs to the MP3 and MP4 digital music storage, which now of late, have begun to to store them from CD to the iPods, sticks and such-like gizmos and contraptions.

With the maassive collection of Duke's music and his musical contemproarires, and various other genres, I have been trying to keep abreast with the ever changing technologies and their techniques, gizmos and so forth just to make sure that the sounds from the 78 rpm's to 33 1/3 rpms, to CD, And then to i-Pods, and sticks for {podcasting is a constant stream of change that was what made us not stop listening to quality sounds from duke and other various artists in many genres).

This has made the present-day South Africans, who have a lot of Musical Jazz listening groups all ovdr the land, is a testament of our love, and understanding of the American Jazz musical idiom, becasue to us, the music might be made by Africans in America,

Well, we look at it as our music and it resonates deeply with us too, here in Mzantsi. We have been with the music the whole step of the way, and many of us, under Apartheid, we were avid, keen and very enamored listeners of the Jazz of the African Americans, and other cultural artifacts.

This is partly my schitck on Duke Ellington, and with time, I will attempt to elaborate even much more further interrogate his impact and effect and affect on us the poor masses of Africans of South Africa.

Comments

ixwa (author) on April 29, 2020:

Much appreciated David Ross...

ixwa (author) on April 29, 2020:

Much appreciated David Ross...

Fotos jazz on April 25, 2020:

Preciosas

David Ross on July 24, 2019:

A wonderful visual memory of musicians I have listened too for many years.

ixwa (author) on September 28, 2016:

trusouldi: Thank you very much for viewing the photos in this Hub, and I really appreciate your feedback...

LaZeric Freeman from Hammond on February 25, 2016:

Beautiful hub. l Love these pictures.

ixwa (author) on September 14, 2014:

Yes, You are right, and I think the person who posted it, as I reposted, was the original photographer, Jim Marshall, made an error he did not see-neither me.. I also went into the Web Photo Bank, and you are right...Well.. Appreciate the correction and have fixed it-- Thanks to you Peter.. Much appreciated...

Peter Washington on September 14, 2014:

Hi- I enjoyed the photos. It was great in particular to see Vernon Alley as I remember him. This has probably been pointed out to you already ( I didn't read all the comments), but you mis- identify the bassist Doug Watkins as "Paul Chambers". Thanks-

ixwa (author) on June 26, 2013:

Ben Blackwell: Thank you very much and You're welcome as you please..

Ben Blackwell on June 26, 2013:

Sure.

ixwa (author) on June 26, 2013:

Ben Blackwell: Thank you very much for viewing and Appreciating the Hub above. I am glad you really encapsulated the thrust and 'essence' of the presentation of jazz artists in their 'moments' of creativity and improv. I really appreciate your kind accolades above...

Ben Blackwell on June 25, 2013:

I just found this after searching Hubpages for jazz articles. This is a cool idea, and I like how you presented it. I am a jazz musician and listener, and I would say that this captured much of the essence of jazz and the jazz artists.

ixwa (author) on March 06, 2012:

Epigramman: Thanks for the posts and the encouragement to carry this writing further. I am greatly appreciative of all the efforts you've put in to encourage me to work even much more harder, and learn more about the Social Media systems and how they worked-if one writes or promotes music. Thanks again.

ixwa (author) on March 06, 2012:

epigramman! Your two postings above did not reflect onto my Statistics, and did not know that you had posted some comments. As usual I appreciate the encouragement you pass on to me. I have just joined Twitter today and am still challenged as to how it works and what one can do with it. But for now, I could do with some tips as to how to utilize it. As I have stated in my FB comments that I am ready and you tell me what you want me to do. I can also write articles on mostly about nine of the artists you have cited above, and much much more. Articles like Short articles on various genres of music; also I can write short articles on varied topics, if that will be good enough, and at least, I still have to learn how to use links to link them to those articles. I also want to write about South African Jazz and other various genres of music in South Africa, and hope to make them interesting, and am willing to put in the time needed to accomplish such a project. How will this help me, with my hubs and exposure, just wondering. Keeping the story and music and personnel of Jazz upfront, wherever and whenever, I am willing to use all the knowledge and strength I have to do it. That is why I keep that flame alive with my puny station. I hope, in due time, when I get sponsors to upgrade to professional wherein I will then be able to bring into play my paltry, but seriously Loaded Music Library, I have built in the house. I am willing to write to large audiences who will read, get informed and enjoy the jazz narratives and Grooves I will be cobbling out. How can I use FB to posts the articles which I have no doubt, I can churn them out very fast and furious?. Thank you for the feedback, which has been delayed two days before I got it. I thank you for the enouragement

epigramman on March 04, 2012:

....also we need more people like you in this group so if you know any more like minded fans of this genre or the blues etc. etc. - please invite them too -

back in the day - I had the pleasure and honor of seeing - perform live - mostly in Toronto , Ontario

....Lenny Breau

Chet Baker

Miles Davis

Muddy Waters

Sonny Stitt

Ella Fitzgerald

Joe Pass

Wynton and Branford Marsalis

Sarah Vaughan

McCoy Tyner

Sun Ra

.....and more ......

epigramman on March 04, 2012:

....well the sooner the better you can get over to our group - lol - because there are only two hardcore jazz fans there - myself of course and Sonia - although that said , other than photography, art, and cinema and fashion I would say that the music element of this group reaches to all demographics and genres - but we need good people like you in the group with your passion and knowledge 4:20am lake erie

ixwa (author) on March 04, 2012:

epigramman! Welcome again to the Hub above and am I happy to read your feedback. I am thrilled at the invitation and I accept humbly. I am also happy that you are posting my meagre efforts at keeping the spirit and story of Jazz alive. I also use my station to keep Jazz alive and work assiduously for my own enjoyment and for the sake of the artists to be able to get renumeration for their work. I ask for no money from the artist but only that they allow me to play their music, and if possible, they send me their music from any quarter of the musical world. I will gladly do what needs to be done too, to write about Jazz, and make sure it does not die. I still have a couple of Hubs in the Works on Jazz and other musical forms or genres and as soon as I finnish them, I will be glad if they could reach a much more wider audience. I am very appreciative of what you are doing for me, and will also do so in kind too in terms of the Hubs. Thank you, again, for the gentle and encouraging accolades and will join your site.

epigramman on March 03, 2012:

...this hub is perfection, a work of art and a labor of love and I have just posted your major hub to our FB group Let's just talk music or cinema with a direct link back here - would love to have you join us there - that would indeed be a honor and a thrill - my name is Colin Stewart at FB with the same profile photo - and on my homepage is a direct link when you click the group title.

lake erie time 7:54pm ontario canada and after viewing this hub it's time to put on a jazz record

ixwa (author) on October 14, 2010:

David R Bradley: Thank you very much for viewing and commenting on the Pictorial essay above, although I was slow to answer your comments. True, we do share the same topic, with a different sub-topic, and of course a different format, meaning, I was also exploring "ways of seeing" our jazz masters in other settings outside any other formal means, that with (Stolen Moments) we see them as our artists, favorite composers, performers and master musicians. You are also right, we do share the same interests, ala-jazz, and I have have also made sure that I promote Jazz and other types of musical genres in my Station called "FASTTRACKS" which can be found on Live365.com/stations/djtot12. I hope you check the station out and holler for me on the staion's "Shout Out" access. I hope you log on it and listen to the variety of Jazz and other musical genres doled-out without being cut or any type of advertisement. Right now I am now working on including all the Vinyl collection I have, and I have very amazing and interesting artist for all Jazz and music lovers. I checked out your suggested article and I will be commenting on it, very soon. Thank you very much, and I really appreciate your comments, visits and other stuff you done for me. Thanks, and I hope you enjoy my Internet Radio Station(FASTTRACKS), and will be looking forward to hearing from you. Thanks.

David R Bradley from The Active Side of Infinity on October 10, 2010:

These are some amazing photos! I wanted you to know we share a similar interest and a similar title! https://hubpages.com/entertainment/Stolen-Moments-

ixwa (author) on September 22, 2010:

Dink96: Welcome to you and have not heard from you in some time. I am glad you liked the Hub above. The station is still on, and am working very hard to insert thousands of very rare vinyl into the Playlist of the station. As time goes on, you might hear the sound of vinyl, but will try to keep; the frying sound to a minimum. This will help to bring about rare music that one no more hears on the Internet radios or FM radio stations. Good to hear from you and thanks to the comments made above, and that is much appreciated. Thanks, and hope to hear from you in the 'shout out' part on the station page.

Dink96 from Phoenix, AZ on September 22, 2010:

Such a phenomenal collection. Thank you! I will listen to your station and check out your other hubs again.

ixwa (author) on June 11, 2010:

music messenger: I would appreciate it if you would listen to may station and give me a 'shout out' whilst you are at it. I am also impressed and happy to see that you are reading the Hubs I have written and hope, as I have said before, I have been able to contribute something which you think of as important. Thank you again, and keep on trucking(reading!). Thanks a lot!

ixwa (author) on June 11, 2010:

music messenger: welcome, again, and I am honored to have you grace the contents of the Hub again. As promised, I will make time and post my two cents on some of your Hubs, and am thrilled to have a fellow-jazz music lover come and give me some sorely needed support on what I am writing about. Thanks again.

music messenger on June 11, 2010:

Thanks ixwa. I will continue to add music reviews and info. Thanks for checking me out. I will listen to your station! Cheers

ixwa (author) on June 11, 2010:

music messenger: hank you very much for visiting the pictorial Hub above. I have taken time out to review your Jazz reviews on your Hug=b. I noted with interested and would like to tell you that I have not only written Hubs on the history of Jazz and Jazz Musicians, but I am also an avid collector of all genre of Music, From Led Zep, to all you can imagine. I have a serious library for Vinyl, 8 track, 4 track tapes, and Cds. I welcome a fellow jazz cat and hope you'll also check-out my Jazz and other musical Hubs. Thank you again and welcome to HubPages. I will soon be going to your Hub to check which one tickles my fancy, so I can be able to post my comments. Again, Welcome! Check-out my station I have listed at the end of my Hub. I really play rare grooves in it...

music messenger on June 11, 2010:

So many great photos, so much talent...Thanks. This was fun. From one jazz fan to another...I have jazz reviews on my hubs. Take a look.

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