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Review of a Forgotten Album "The Least Successful Human Cannonball" by German Thrash Metal Band Destruction

Ara is a journalism graduate from California State University Northridge who is always looking to explore his writing opportunities.

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Why This Album Might Be Considered a Forgotten One

The Least Successful Human Cannonball is one of those albums that may as well be considered a forgotten metal album due to the fact that it was eventually disowned by the band and as such it is no longer considered a part of the discography of German thrash metal band Destruction. Whether they want to admit it or not, disowning an album doesn’t make it go away and it will still technically be a part of the discography of this great band. Ignoring a musical work that has been created doesn’t make it magically go away so I think that the band Destruction should admit that this album is still part of their discography. For 1998 standards, releasing an album that is more hardcore and crossover would not have been a bad idea for a band that started on that kind of musical foundation. But for a band such as Destruction that has been a major part of the German thrash metal scene, releasing an album such as this one can be seen as a sort of aberration.

A Major Musical Style Change by the Band Destruction

What is present on this 1998 album is not your typical thrash metal by Destruction but a 1990s influenced hardcore and crossover metal similar to Corrosion of Conformity. That is obviously a huge musical shift from what we are used to hearing from this band.

A Ridiculous Musical Moment

The other thing is that the song title of “263 Dead Popes” is just really lame and it makes you want to laugh about it constantly. The beginning riff of this song though is respectable so there is that good thing. However, the song is about the fact that GOD is dead and Jesus has left the scene. How absurd this is! I don’t know what these guys were thinking but this is not the kind of song that these guys should be writing.

A Very Inconsistent Album by a Great Band

Songs such as “Autoaggression” feature the vocalist trying to force himself to sound like a crossover thrash metal vocalist. Destruction changed vocalists once again after their 1990 studio album Cracked Brain and it did not pay off for themmostly from a vocal standpoint. Thomas Rosenmerkel was not the vocalist for this band, a band that has made a name for themselves with sharp riffs and outstanding songwriting. The Least Successful Human Cannonball might as well be titled “The Least Successful Destruction Album” because this is the one album that will receive a lot of criticism from metal fans that really love the thrash metal genre.

Final Thoughts

Even when songs such as “Hoffmannn’s Helll” start off with a good acoustic section, it turns into a hardcore/grove metal song about suffering in hell. Not all is bad on an album that has been disowned and forgotten. This is because there is a glimmer of musical hope with the instrumental song called “A Fake Transition.” As we know, one good song does not make an album good. It is just one part of an album or one slice of a pizza that has been badly burnt. “Formless, Faceless, Nameless” starts off this album as the song’s name is uttered twice before the bass line starts. It sounds like an early crossover thrash metal song which as we have alluded to is not something that fits well with these guys. The Least Successful Human Cannonball is definitely the weakest album in the history of the band Destruction. There are some that will say that this album was rightfully disowned but I take a different approach to this issue. This was an album that was still recorded, produced, and put out and it should stay in the band’s discography. While this album isn’t a total flop it is also not the first album to listen to from these guys if you are just getting into the band. On the other hand if you like late 1990s groove metal or crossover thrash, you might just really like this album.

© 2021 Ara Vahanian

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