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Music Is the Soundtrack of Our Lives: Breaking and Breaching the Musical Sound Barrier

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Male and Female Tswana Traditional Dancing int heir traditional clothes and moving the the music

Male and Female Tswana Traditional Dancing int heir traditional clothes and moving the the music

Music is our universal language. Musical DNA maps the entire genome of the musical language - every combination of every musical note. Music is a world within itself, with a language we all understand

Music is our universal language. Musical DNA maps the entire genome of the musical language - every combination of every musical note. Music is a world within itself, with a language we all understand

Sangomas doing their ancestral dance backed up by a drum or drums

Sangomas doing their ancestral dance backed up by a drum or drums

The Kudu Horn blowers in action blowing the horn and African drum player

The Kudu Horn blowers in action blowing the horn and African drum player

Amampondo Kudu Horn blower in Action

Amampondo Kudu Horn blower in Action

Amampondo Male and Female singers in Live concert performance and wearing their traditional Xhosa garb

Amampondo Male and Female singers in Live concert performance and wearing their traditional Xhosa garb

An Amampondo singer and performer painted in traditional paint markings in performance

An Amampondo singer and performer painted in traditional paint markings in performance

Gabrielle Thobejane on the African drums and and the backing duo of Amampondo in action

Gabrielle Thobejane on the African drums and and the backing duo of Amampondo in action

The Amampondo singers in their traditional make up and regalia

The Amampondo singers in their traditional make up and regalia

The Kudu Horn Backing section of the Amampondo

The Kudu Horn Backing section of the Amampondo

The members of the African church of Shembe, in South Africa. Note their walking barefooted and all the elders in the front rows

The members of the African church of Shembe, in South Africa. Note their walking barefooted and all the elders in the front rows

a Capella and traditional songs. south African Music, is now a Fusion of South African Music cultures as can be seen in the mixed traditonal garb.

a Capella and traditional songs. south African Music, is now a Fusion of South African Music cultures as can be seen in the mixed traditonal garb.

Ladysmith Black Mambazo a Zulu a Capella group from South Africa performing at Carnegie Hall

Ladysmith Black Mambazo a Zulu a Capella group from South Africa performing at Carnegie Hall

The Pedi Male Dancers in south Africa with a visiting Asian dancer

The Pedi Male Dancers in south Africa with a visiting Asian dancer

Ndebele male initiates dancing to their traditional renditions

Ndebele male initiates dancing to their traditional renditions

Shangaan Dancers performing and clad in their Traditional attire

Shangaan Dancers performing and clad in their Traditional attire

Crocodile Gunboat Dancers of South Africa. They have this mesmerizing fiddle music tat one would think it comes from the swamps of Louisiana

Crocodile Gunboat Dancers of South Africa. They have this mesmerizing fiddle music tat one would think it comes from the swamps of Louisiana

Xanikhwe dancers from the Central Kalahari going through their paces at the Kuru San Festival at D'Kar, South(West) Africa

Xanikhwe dancers from the Central Kalahari going through their paces at the Kuru San Festival at D'Kar, South(West) Africa

Gumboot Dancers from South Africa

Gumboot Dancers from South Africa

A groups of Xhosa diviners dancing to their ancestral music in their traditional garb

A groups of Xhosa diviners dancing to their ancestral music in their traditional garb

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Traditional Xhosa dancing lasses performing on the day of the Congress

Traditional Xhosa dancing lasses performing on the day of the Congress

Oliver Mtukudzi from Zimbabwe and his co-singer

Oliver Mtukudzi from Zimbabwe and his co-singer

(1) Ransome Fela Kuti (2) Local Peru Africans in a a traditional Afro-Peruvian Dance (3) Phuzekhemisi - the South African South African Singer (4) Peter Tosh's Recordings

(1) Ransome Fela Kuti (2) Local Peru Africans in a a traditional Afro-Peruvian Dance (3) Phuzekhemisi - the South African South African Singer (4) Peter Tosh's Recordings

Performing live, Fela belts-out his lyrics in 'pidgin-English' and most of his songs very critical of the military regime in Nigeria

Performing live, Fela belts-out his lyrics in 'pidgin-English' and most of his songs very critical of the military regime in Nigeria

Fela Kuti in performance about to play his sax

Fela Kuti in performance about to play his sax

Fela in full swing and jam mode in one of his many live concerts

Fela in full swing and jam mode in one of his many live concerts

Fela helping a band member tun-up his guitar

Fela helping a band member tun-up his guitar

The Gnawa musicians in a circle and singing mode

The Gnawa musicians in a circle and singing mode

Mahmoud Gania, one of the Gnawa Master Musicians guitar player

Mahmoud Gania, one of the Gnawa Master Musicians guitar player

Abdellah El Gourd, one of the Gnawa Master Musicians guitar player

Abdellah El Gourd, one of the Gnawa Master Musicians guitar player

The Instruments used by the the Gnawa Master Musicians

The Instruments used by the the Gnawa Master Musicians

Gnawa Musicians in Essaouira, Morocco. Musician in the center is paying 'graqeb', large metal castanet-type things. The other instruments is a Hajoul(Hajhul), Guimbri or Sintir, a three stringed bass instrument with a camel skin covering its body

Gnawa Musicians in Essaouira, Morocco. Musician in the center is paying 'graqeb', large metal castanet-type things. The other instruments is a Hajoul(Hajhul), Guimbri or Sintir, a three stringed bass instrument with a camel skin covering its body

The clapping and vocals section of the Gnawa Musicians

The clapping and vocals section of the Gnawa Musicians

Gnawa Masters in Action

Gnawa Masters in Action

Africans in Peru, in the town of El Carmen, performing their cultural dance

Africans in Peru, in the town of El Carmen, performing their cultural dance

"Festejo Ritmo dancers bare-footed, jumping foot to foot, shake shoulders and spin, dance separately with energetic exuberance. This is a dance performed by Africans in Peru

"Festejo Ritmo dancers bare-footed, jumping foot to foot, shake shoulders and spin, dance separately with energetic exuberance. This is a dance performed by Africans in Peru

The Peru Negro Band

The Peru Negro Band

Peru Negro Singers

Peru Negro Singers

Peru Negro Artists in a Live Perfomance Pose

Peru Negro Artists in a Live Perfomance Pose

Music of Peru Negro

Music of Peru Negro

Bob Marley Live in Concert

Bob Marley Live in Concert

The Wailers back-up Ladies, The _-Threes

The Wailers back-up Ladies, The _-Threes

Bob Marley and the Wailers with their back-up singers, the I-Threes

Bob Marley and the Wailers with their back-up singers, the I-Threes

Peter Tosh, the legendary Reggae Singer

Peter Tosh, the legendary Reggae Singer

Los Van Van Live in Miami

Los Van Van Live in Miami

Los Van Van's festival attendees and dancers

Los Van Van's festival attendees and dancers

Pedro Calvo nd Van Van in the background

Pedro Calvo nd Van Van in the background

Los Van Van  Front-Line: Juan Formell, Pedro Calvo, Mario Rivera, Roberto Fernandez

Los Van Van Front-Line: Juan Formell, Pedro Calvo, Mario Rivera, Roberto Fernandez

Live Show Dancers in a Loss van Van concert

Live Show Dancers in a Loss van Van concert

Live Concert dancing by fans to the music of Los Van Van

Live Concert dancing by fans to the music of Los Van Van

Los Van Van Live in Miami

Los Van Van Live in Miami

Fans in the Miami Arena for the Van Van Live concert captured and enthralled

Fans in the Miami Arena for the Van Van Live concert captured and enthralled

In a recent cultural exchange, as part of the Obama Administration's improving US-Cuba relations, Cuba sent Los Van Van and the US sent Kool and the Gang in support of Cultural Exchange support. Van Van Bowing after show

In a recent cultural exchange, as part of the Obama Administration's improving US-Cuba relations, Cuba sent Los Van Van and the US sent Kool and the Gang in support of Cultural Exchange support. Van Van Bowing after show

Cuba's most famous Salsa band Loss van Van perform at the James L. Knight Center Miami. They are embarking on a 70-concert tour in numerous cities in the United States, part of the Obama initiative from April 2010

Cuba's most famous Salsa band Loss van Van perform at the James L. Knight Center Miami. They are embarking on a 70-concert tour in numerous cities in the United States, part of the Obama initiative from April 2010

Throngs, over a million have come to see Los Van Van

Throngs, over a million have come to see Los Van Van

Cape Colored preparing for a Minstrel Carnival and will be marching the streets with a Brass Band

Cape Colored preparing for a Minstrel Carnival and will be marching the streets with a Brass Band

Kids being encouraged to create and play in a Brass Band. They need donation of both instruments and money

Kids being encouraged to create and play in a Brass Band. They need donation of both instruments and money

Some of the Mbaqanga music CDs of the music of the Africans in south Africa

Some of the Mbaqanga music CDs of the music of the Africans in south Africa

A good collection of some of the Mbaqanga and pop musicians's CDs of the Africans in South Africa

A good collection of some of the Mbaqanga and pop musicians's CDs of the Africans in South Africa

Music In the Historical Groove

Music My Way

Music and its soundtracks are part of our lives and it has been naturally been wired into our DNA. There's many types of Music the world over, and the music helps breaks the sound barriers. Different types of music exist in all cultures all over the world. But, at the same time, there was music from other cultures in the international world which has added to the dimensions and effects on music no matter what culture one is in.

Growing up one started hearing church music sung in different homes and those around us; cultural music, sacred music, drums, hand clapping, wailing and humming; outright full throats songs for the ancestors and that music of the healers, initiates and big-band church marches and singers from different churches throughout the ghetto; Then there was music sung by street a Capella troupes; music by local groups singing and practicing music and dance steps. Music was everywhere in the churches; one would hear hymns from local known and secret societies.

Roman, Lutheran, Seventh-Day Adventists, African Methodists; The African Church of Shembe; Zion Christian Churches; ZCC Male Groups thumping and stumping the ground in rhythmic unison and percussive rumblings; there was music that was performed by the local drum majorettes along with their drummer and bugle blowers in semi-military-civilian garb in bright colors; and, in the local trains there were singing trio, duets, quintets of church music and local "type" of Doo-Wop music as the carriages rattled into the sprawling smoke filled ghettoes.

There was music of gumboot dancing from the local miners(which is akin to Step Dance amongst the African American); One has been exposed to street by street musical competitions amongst the children, youth and adults singing, dancing by taking out their best performances and singing their hears out in different harmonious duets, quartets, quintets and small group choirs, and so on.

There was also cultural music performed by the different ethnic groups who were only too eager to show-off their new styles and singing their newly composed songs; whether it be praises of their clans, kings, important personalities; these would be clad in all their cultural garb and decorations denoting the importance of the musicians, performing the Indlamu male dance, or women dance, Mokgibo by the Basothos, or the smooth and stylish Batswanas, to the energetic Shangaan drummers and dancers; one would see the Amaswazi with long reed-like sticks adorning their cultural cloth, along with the Xhosas and their very melodious, boisterous and very cocky and confident short-stepped-shuffling-like dance holding a stick. Music was to be seen and head or appreciated in various events on weekends, holidays and special days.

Over 80% of south Africans visits a Sangoma/healer many times a month or year. They receive counseling and herbs to heal their ailments. Since Mandela became President, he had has encouraged a formation of An Association of the the Healers, who are now working in tandem with local and Provincial hospital. There are times when Sangomas become engaged in celebrating their ancestors, and then they would beat drums and dance to specific and particular ancestral dances. This is a wonderful occasions for this is when they will display their various dances, songs and moves as danced by their elder Ancestors.

The Zionist Churches proliferated throughout Southern Africa, and became African Independent Churches; research in 1996 suggested that 40% of all African south Africans belonged to a zionist Church. Its followers say that the reason they like being in these churches was because they were African. They say everything they did in these churches - the songs they sings, they way they jump and do things - one does not feel like a foreigner, but one feels like an Africa.

Some of its adherents say that the whole secret led in obeying what the ancestors require of one. The men dance in formation and have different routine. The Lekganyane's ZCC dancers and singers wear Khaki uniforms and white shoes made of car-tires for the rhythmic jumps, dances and styles backed up by their coral-a Capella-choir-like singing in unison and harmony.

One got exposed and acculturated to all these forms of music from gang-workers singing and swinging their working implements in unison whilst working, to those in the vegetable and sugarcane fields workers steadily tending to the fields and crops. There was also music which was born in the prisons and there was music that could heard coming from the earlier times from the Missionaries and choirs, Minstrels, Marabi, Kwela, Mbaqanga and Mbaqanga Jazz, The New African Jazz, Jazz in Exile, Jazz at home in south Africa, Pop, rock and crossover and so forth.

South African Music is entwined with dance, and runs through the blood of its people, and is an inseparable part of their hearts, minds, souls, spirits. What can be witnessed is that its diversity of music ranges from raucous and lively festivals(Opikopi) to fashionable classical concerts, from the unique Maskanda and Township Kwaito Style(South African hip-hop version), to world renowned African Jazz, rock and cultural music in the mix.

Cultural Wars- The Video Story Of Africans and their Cultural And Customary Dance Routines With Their Accompanying Retinues..

am an unashamed "Cultural Warrior", and I battle more intensely and passionately on that forgotten front- Music, Dance and Poetry/Drama. In this article, I am concentrating on the War against Africans and their culture, and I will utilize all the cultural dances of the Zulus, Sothos, Xhosas, Pedis, Tswanas, Shangaans, Vendas, Ndebeles, Swazis the Khoisan, "Colored" people through videos.

I have been posting a lot of music from all over the world, and specifically, that is, 98.5% of the times I have been exploring music of Africans from South Africa, The Whole of Africa, South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and the USA. The next coming posts are going to be strictly from the 10-12 Peoples(nations) of South africa. It is important that we, in Mzantsi, begin to start dispelling these false notions that we are a different people from each other as instructed and promoted by the Boers and their lackeys.

What I found on YouTube about our African South African Music and culture, it is more admired by the listeners of other cultures all over the world, but only a motley crew and paltry few of us even care to comment or listen to our own productions and our performed cultures, traditions, dance and music. This says a lot about our mind-set, and it is a shame that we are doing what Bob Marley, who I have cited often, singing, "You Can't Run Away From Yourself".

We are avoiding ourselves; we feel edified if we identify with western culture and its mores and norms-msuic and culture. We are so dumbed-down, we think that our own culture, which we perform with such gusto, energy an, finesse,grace and energy that it is still baffling the people of the west-were one to read some comments on YouTube of the people who have watched these videos, is of no consequence.There are some South Africans who chirp and chip-in on the videos and make some great comments. But, in all, we hardly see our culture presented and produced as I am about to do, very intensely and in a big way, that is, in its variegated form, for all the 10-12 peoples of Mzantsi I have already mentioned above, present our dance and music on a lot of musical videos.

Clear Channel, an American Conglomerate, owns all the Radio stations in Mzantsi, and the diet of the programming is heavily biased, tinted and leaning towards the American music and artists. Television leaves less to be desired. The constant image that is being filtered and disseminated on our Plasma TV and those old fat TV boxes we the poor own, is nothing but American Cultural Imperialism.

Bob Marley sings in his track "Trenchtown Rock" that "..We Feed People With Music.". He was right and he knew what it was he was saying and singing about. If one were to give oneself a chance to look at our dance and music as I will be posting them here on FB, one begins to discern various patterns in style execution and technique that they are of 'One People'. This is the nub of the problem and issue that bedevils our development as a people. We have as yet to come around to embracing our culture with all that it has to offer us in order to "BE"!

Some of the music we dance to profusely is infused with Mbaqanga music which runs the gamut of this 'whole' culture. In other instances we use the homegrown and original music of the culture itself, of any of the 10-12 people I have mentioned above. We have been dislocated from understanding and fully appreciating that, like in wearing our cultural pride on our sleeves and not giving a care in the world who says what, so long it is us who are owning, controlling and disseminating our culture, without making excuses to no one-nor asking for permission to do so.