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Cry Macho Movie Review

Nathan is a film critic and aspiring author with a true passion for the film industry & hopes his writings will help launch his careers.

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Ever since Gran Torino, Clint Eastwood has been delivering films that showcased his more personal self. As I see it, Gran Torino was the "death" of his macho persona and now he's using his films to show his personal side, each film peeling back a layer and revealing something more.

The film follows an aged former rodeo rider who is tasked to go to Mexico and retrieve his boss's son then bring him back home. The way back proves a challenge though as the boy's mother refuses to let go of her "property". She sends goons out to stop them and even reports the boy kidnapped to the police all in an attempt to thwart the rescue.

I love the heart and emotion that Clint pours into his films. You can tell that these stories are ones he cares about, ones he connects with, and ones he communicates through. There's a heartbreaking moment when the boy says "you used to be macho but now you're nothing" to which Clint replies "I used to be a lot of things but I'm not anymore". If that's not a statement about himself, I don't know what is. The man's 91 and still going, but it's obvious how each film is like another piece of advice your grandpa gives you before he moves on.

Cry Macho has some great humor and some intense moments and there's not one thing wrong with it despite what some critics might say. Clint made this film for himself just as much as he made it for you. Enjoy it and soak it in. He's trying to speak to you. Listen.

Eduardo Minett performed wonderfully as the young boy being rescued, bringing believability to his role. He was a great choice to pair with Clint, both of them rough around the edges and learning from one another.

While I know this is a shorter than usual review, I can't recommend this film enough. I'm giving it a 4 out of 4 with a hefty applause for Clint and a life well-lived.

© 2021 Nathan Jasper

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