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The Sun and the Moon Lesson

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I am a Christian. I was an 8th-grade American History teacher. I am currently a freelance writer, public speaker, & homeschooling mom of 9.

Creating "craters" on our flour moon surface

Creating "craters" on our flour moon surface

This is part 2 of a 4 part hands-on unit study on Astronomy. Form the lunar phases using Oreo cookies, drop balls in flour to make a crater-filled lunar surface, recreate Galileo's famous gravity experiment, and more! My lessons are geared toward 3rd-4th grade level children and their siblings. These are lessons I created to do with a weekly co-op. We meet each week for 2 1/2 hours and have 14 children between the ages of 1-13. Use these fun lessons with your classroom, family, after school program, or co-op!

Our Earth

Our Earth

Introduction & The Round Earth

1. Stretch & pray.

2. Read and discuss Genesis 1: 14-19.

3. Ask the children, "When you look out the window, does the world look flat? Why? Does it look like to sun moves around us or we move around the sun? How do you know those aren't the case?" It wasn't always the case that we knew the world was round & the Earth revolved around the sun.

4. Briefly introduce the history of astronomy by reading the first page of Boy, Were We Wrong About the Solar System by Kathleen V. Kudlinski.

5. Discuss how we learned the earth is round. Mention a bit about Erastothenes. Hold a toy against a ball or globe. Slowly rotate the globe/ball asking the children if they can see the toy yet and if they can see all of it yet. It will gradually come into view just like ships would appear coming over the horizon. You can also get additional ideas of what to say here .

YOU WILL NEED: a ball/globe, a small toy, and a broom or straight stick

Book used for activities 4 & 6

Acting out revolving

Acting out revolving

Copernicus & the Revolving Earth

6. Read the next few first pages of Boy, Were We Wrong About the Solar System by Kathleen V. Kudlinski. Until after it mentions Galileo's work.

7. Read some of Nicolaus Copernicus: The Earth Is a Planet by Dennis B. Fradin.

8. Act out revolving. Place a lamp (turned on) in the middle of the room. Have everyone stand in a circle around the lamp. Have them walk counterclockwise around the lamp and ask how long it takes the earth to revolve around the sun.

YOU WILL NEED: a lamp, lantern, or flashlight

Book used for activity 7

Our Earth: Night and Day

Our Earth: Night and Day

Day & Night

9. Read What Makes Day and Night by Franklyn M. Branley.

10. Act out rotating. Place a lamp (turned on) in the middle of the room. Have everyone stand in a circle around the lamp. Mention that the Earth is tilted pointing toward Polaris, so have them tilt their heads toward a picture of a star on the wall. Have them rotate on their axis by turning around so their back is to the lamp/sun. Have them say, "Night." Turn counterclockwise with your side to the lamp and say, "Sunrise." Turn counterclockwise facing the sun and say, "Noon." Turn counterclockwise with your side to the lamp and say, "Sunset." Go through everything again. Now have everyone rotate and revolve around the lamp/sun. You can also get additional ideas of what to say from this lesson plan and this lesson plan.

YOU WILL NEED: a lamp

11. Show a picture of the Earth taken from space that shows half the Earth in blackness. Ask, "What happened to the rest of the Earth?" Point at different places on the picture and ask what time it is in the picture (i.e. the blackness is night, the point on the Earth between the blackness and the light is sunrise, etc.)

Book used for activity 9

Acting out the force of gravity

Acting out the force of gravity

Gravity

12. Ask the children what keeps the Earth revolving around the sun (Gravity). Demonstrate: Have all but 1 child sit at one side of the room. Have 1 child stand next to you. Hold hands. Tell the child to go and sit with the other children while still holding your hand. Meanwhile, you should spin around in a circle a few times and hold on tightly to his/her hand. Ask: What direction was s/he trying to go? What direction did the s/he go? Why couldn't s/he go straight? What did I represent? (sun) What did s/he represent? (Earth) What did our arms represent? (gravity)

13. If you are not limited by time, read through some of Gravity Is a Mystery by Franklyn M. Branley.

Optional book to read for activity 13

Recreating Galileo's Gravity Experiment

Recreating Galileo's Gravity Experiment

Galileo's Gravity Experiment

14. Ask the children what they think of when they think of science. Hopefully someone will say, "Experiments." Tell them that wasn't always the case. Briefly mention Aristotle and how scientists accepted whatever he taught as true. Briefly mention how Galileo challenged that way of thinking.

15. Do Galileo/Pisa experiment to demonstrate effects of gravity. Tell them that Aristotle said that items that weigh more will drop faster. Give each child a baseball, tennis ball or orange and a penny. Have them stand on a chair or someplace higher if possible. Ask, "Which item do you think will land first?" Have them hold out both hands and drop the items at the same time. They should land at the same time. (The higher up from which they drop them, the better this will be demonstrated.) Switch out the penny for a piece of paper. Now ask, "Which item do you think will land first?" Have them drop them at the same time. The ball should land first. Now have them crumple up the paper tightly. Ask, "Which item do you think will land first?" Have them drop them at the same time. They should land at the same time. Ask, "What happened?" Explain that they changed the surface area of the paper. The paper floated lightly through the air at first but after you change the surface area, it can't get caught up in the wind anymore. If our planet was like Mercury or the moon and didn't have an atmosphere, even the un-crumpled paper would fall at the same speed." Show pictures of Galileo's experiment from Galileo's Leaning Tower Experiment by Wendy Macdonald (optional).

YOU WILL NEED PER CHILD: baseball, tennis ball or orange, penny, & a piece of paper

Optional book we used for activity 15

Showing a telescope

Showing a telescope

Galileo & the Telescope

16. Galileo was well known for encouraging scientists to test the theories of Aristotle using experiments like the one we just did. He was also well known for his developments on the telescope with which he used to study the moon.

17. Read some of Galileo's Journal, 1609-1610 by Jeanne Pettenati (leaving out the dates and locations in the journal entries).

18. (OPTIONAL) Pass around a telescope and let children look out the window using it.

YOU WILL NEED: a telescope or binoculars

Book used for activity 17

Creating the moon's surface using "crater" balls and flour

Creating the moon's surface using "crater" balls and flour

The Moon's Surface

19. Read Moon by Steve Tomecek. (Skip page 15.)

20. Create the moon's surface. Cover an area with newspapers as this will get flour everywhere. Give each child a cake pan with about 2 cups of flour (surface of the moon) in it and 3 small balls of different sizes (meteorites). Ask them what each item represents. Let them drop the balls in the flour and create craters. Ask them if this is what the Earth looks like and why. The moon has no atmosphere. God protected our planet with an atmosphere to burn up meteorites as they blast onto our planet.

YOU WILL NEED PER CHILD: cake or pie pan (brought by families), 2 cups of flour, and 3 balls of various sizes

Book used for activity 19

Looking at a moon rock

Looking at a moon rock

Moon Rocks

21. (OPTIONAL) Show a photograph of the moon's surface and a picture of a moon rock. Pass around a piece of basalt and explain how this igneous rock is very similar to what moon rocks look like as much of the "seas" of the moon are made of basalt.

YOU WILL NEED: 1 piece of basalt

Showing how the moon reflects the light of the sun

Showing how the moon reflects the light of the sun

Moon Reflecting the Sun's Light

22. Show how the moon reflects the light of sun & how phases are made. Give each child a ball (I used tennis balls.) and a piece of aluminum foil. Have them wrap the ball with the foil. This is your moon. Have them each grab their flashlight. Everyone gets to cram into 1 or 2 bathrooms (the only dark rooms in my house). Turn off the lights. Can they see their moon? (No.) Now have them each turn on their flashlights (the sun). Can they see their moon now? (Yes.) What did this show them? (The moon shines because it reflects the light of the moon.) Have all but 1 child turn off their flashlight. Use a ball (the Earth) & have it slowly move between the light from the flashlight & the moon. Watch how on parts of the moon are illuminated. This is what causes lunar phases. Yes, the complete moon is always there, but you can only see parts of it because the Earth gets between some of the rays of sunshine and the moon. You can get additional ideas of what to say by looking at this lesson plan or this lesson plan.

YOU WILL NEED PER CHILD OR PAIR OF CHILDREN: 2 balls (one about the size of a tennis ball & one about the size of a soccer or basketball) flashlight (brought by families) & aluminum foil

Oreo lunar phases

Oreo lunar phases

Oreo Lunar Phases

23. Show the various lunar phases by showing the cut outs in Faces of the Moon by Bob Crelin.

24. Create the moon's phases using Oreo cookies and then eat cookies & drink water. Review what we've learned so far as they eat the cookies.

YOU WILL NEED PER CHILD: 5 Oreo-type cookies, 1 copy of the moon phases Oreo sheet from The Moon's Phases Using Oreo Cookies , 1 plastic knife or spoon, 1 napkin, and 1 cup for water

Book used for activity 23

Lunar eclipse, which my son described as looking like "a barbecue-flavored potato chip."

Lunar eclipse, which my son described as looking like "a barbecue-flavored potato chip."

Eclipses & Review

25. Read Eclipse: Darkness in Daytime by Franklyn Mansfield Branley. Halfway through the book have the children look out the window at a tree. Close one eye. Hold up one finger and position it so that you can't see the tree. Ask, "Did the tree disappear? Why did it appear to no longer be there?" Your finger (smaller than the tree) was able to block out the tree because it's closer to you. The moon is closer to us so it is able to block out the enormous sun during an eclipse.

26. Show a picture of a lunar eclipse and discuss the one we saw in December 2010. (It turns red because the sun's light passes through the atmosphere of the Earth...kind of like at sunrise and sunset.)

27. Review Planets Go Spinning song from last week's Solar System lesson.

28. Sing Day, Night, & Year song.

(Tune: " The Farmer in the Dell")

The Earth rotates around, (Spin around in place)

The Earth rotates around,

Once a day, in 24 hours, (Tap wrist like you're tapping a watch)

The Earth rotates around.

The moon rotates 'round the Earth, (Hold up 1 finger & spin around in place)

The moon rotates 'round the Earth,

Once a month, 29 days, (Tap wrist like you're tapping a watch)

The moon rotates 'round the Earth.

The Earth revolves 'round the sun, (Hold out one finger & wave around in a large circle)

The Earth revolves 'round the sun,

Once a year, 365 days, (Tap wrist like you're tapping a watch)

The Earth revolves 'round the sun.

Book used for activity 25

Videos: Watch "Falling Bodies" Experiments

Watch the recreation of Galileo's "falling objects experiment at the Leaning Tower of Pisa and the original footage of a hammer & feather getting dropped on the moon by an Apollo 15 astronaut.

More of Our Favorite Galileo Books

There are many great books written for children on Galileo. In addition to the books we used during this lesson, we also really enjoyed:

  • Galileo's Treasure Box by Catherine Brighton
  • Galileo: Scientist and Stargazer (What's Their Story) by Jacqueline Mitton
  • Along Came Galileo by Jeanne Bendick
  • Starry Messenger: Galileo Galilei by Peter Sís
  • Galileo by Leonard Everett Fisher
  • Galileo for Kids: His Life and Ideas, 25 Activities (For Kids series) by Richard Panchyk (Activity ideas and text for older children or adults)
Sun Cookies from Lesson 3: Comets, Asteroids, Meteors, Stars, & Constellations

Sun Cookies from Lesson 3: Comets, Asteroids, Meteors, Stars, & Constellations

Looking for all of my unit studies and lessons?

Looking for all of my unit studies and lessons?

Make planet pizzas as you study planets, form the lunar phases using Oreo cookies as you study the moon, study and paint Van Gogh's "Starry Night " as you study stars, build and blast off rockets as you study space exploration, make presentations on individual planets, and more during this 4 part hands-on unit study on the solar system.

Solar System Lesson - This is part 1 of a 4 part hands-on unit on Astronomy. Make planet pizzas, take a planet walk, and more in this exciting lesson on our fascinating solar system!

The Sun and the Moon Lesson - This is part 2 of a 4 part hands-on unit study on Astronomy. Form the lunar phases using Oreo cookies, drop balls in flour to make a crater-filled lunar surface, recreate Galileo's famous gravity experiment, and more!

Comets, Asteroids, Meteors, Stars, & Constellations - This is part 3 of a 4 part hands-on unit study on Astronomy. Make a comet, study and paint Van Gogh's "Starry Night," decorate a cookie to learn the parts of the sun, form asteroids out of mashed potatoes, assemble constellations using marshmallows, and more!

Astronauts, Rockets, and Space Ships Lesson - This is part 4 of a 4 part hands-on unit on Astronomy. Make rockets, try out astronaut tasks, make and eat a spacecraft, and more in this fun lesson on space exploration!

Astronomy Presentations and Field Trip Ideas - This is the culminating activity we did after a 4 part hands-on unit on astronomy. We held a star-gazing party and dinner. The children each presented on an assigned planet and they sang the astronomy songs we've been learning during our unit. Also included are the field trips we took during this unit.

Fun, FREE Hands-on Unit Studies - Over the years I have posted over 40 science and social-studies based unit studies, compromised of more than 170 lessons. The unit studies include the Human Body, Simple Machines, Earth Science, Medieval Period, American Revolution, Pioneer Life, Countries of the World, and many more! For each lesson I have included activities (with photos), our favorite books and YouTube video clips, lapbook links, and other resources.

Konos Volume 1

Konos Volume 1

Konos Curriculum

Would you like to teach this way every day?

Konos Curriculum

I use Konos Curriculum as a springboard from which to plan my lessons. It's a wonderful curriculum and was created by moms with active boys!

Konos Home School Mentor

If you're new to homeschooling or in need of some fresh guidance, I highly recommend Konos' HomeSchoolMentor.com program! Watch videos on-line of what to do each day and how to teach it in this great hands-on format!

What do you see when you look at the moon? - Or just let me know you dropped by! Was this lens helpful? Do you have any questions, comments, or additional ideas

Shannon (author) from Florida on November 28, 2016:

Thank you so much! I buy our favorite books. We get most of our extra books at the library.

Stephanie on November 06, 2016:

Wow, these are fabulous books and ideas! Great job lesson planning! Do you usually get your extra books from the library or do you buy all these books? Thanks!

Shannon (author) from Florida on March 05, 2013:

@anonymous: Thank you!

anonymous on March 05, 2013:

When I see the moon (from now on), I think I'm going to think about the moon phases in "oreo" style. Then I can enjoy eating them afterward. Great ideas.

Shannon (author) from Florida on October 09, 2012:

@bushaex: Interesting idea!

Stephen Bush from Ohio on October 08, 2012:

Here is one thing I think of, and it would be a great bonus question for the lesson plan if we had a decent way to authenticate an answer: How many times has the phrase "the sun and the moon" been used in movies or television episodes? This is generally in the context of a romantic phrasing like "You mean the sun and the moon to me". Just another measure of how important the sun and the moon are to us. SquidAngel blessings.

Shannon (author) from Florida on July 21, 2012:

@favored: Thank you!

Fay Favored from USA on July 20, 2012:

I like how you begin your lesson with the Word. As always your lessons are creative, interactive and memorable.

anonymous on March 09, 2012:

very helpful lens, thanks for sharing this

myraggededge on February 27, 2012:

Very creative and I love that the kids get to experience the movement and spin of a planet affected by gravity. Pass the Oreos! Blessed :-)

anonymous on January 27, 2012:

This is really a nice lesson plan for the sun and moon.

norma-holt on December 14, 2011:

Wonderful stuff here and it is now feaured on what is a Blue Moon. Hugs

lasertek lm on May 25, 2011:

really nice touches. Take a peek at my lens, Homeschooling 101: Guide to Free Curriculum and Other Resources.

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