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Taxonomy, Animal Classification, and Invertebrates Lesson Plan

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I am a Christian. I was an 8th-grade American History teacher. I am currently a freelance writer, public speaker, & homeschooling mom of 9.

Observing life in pond water

Observing life in pond water

This is part 1 of a 5 part hands-on unit study on zoology from a Christian perspective. Examine pond water and yeast cells under a microscope, dissect an oyster, sing "The Six Kingdom" song, eat 5 of the kingdoms on a supreme pizza, and more! My lessons are geared toward 3rd-4th grade level children and their siblings. I created this lesson to do with a weekly homeschool co-op. We meet each week for 2 1/2 hours and have 10 children between the ages of 0-13. Use these fun lessons with your classroom, family, after school club, camp, or co-op!

Learning about taxonomy and dividing things into groups

Learning about taxonomy and dividing things into groups

Organizing and Dividing

1) Read Genesis 1:20-30 & discuss divisions of animals in creation and that God created each kind of animal. Emphasize that humans are not animals.

2) Divide children into 2 groups and have them divide a bag of objects into 2 groups.

  • Ask why they divided them that way.
  • Have them divide those 2 groups into 3 more groups (6 groups in total). Ask why they divided them that way.
  • Explain this is what scientists do with living things. It will help you remember the items better.
  • Ask if the items in the group all were derived or came from one thing. No, they didn't. Some scientists try to divide up living items because they say they all have 1 ancestor. That is not what the Bible teaches. Taxonomy is simply a way to divide up items so that we can learn more about that particular group.

YOU WILL NEED: 2 bags of random items, about 30 items per bag (I just dumped out our junk drawer and divided the items into 2 bags.)

taxonomy-animal-classification-and-invertebrates-lesson-plan

Activate Yeast

3) Begin prepping yeast.

  • Tell the children that if conditions for growth and reproduction become unfavorable, yeasts form spores within their cells and become inactive. The yeast in this package is inactive.
  • Ask, "What do we need to do to cause the yeast to become active?" (add water & sugar)
  • Add one-half of the dry yeast package to warm water & sugar.
  • Allow to stand for about 30 minutes in a warm place.

YOU WILL NEED: 1 packet of yeast, sugar, water, and bowl

Naming spoons using the binomial nomenclature system

Naming spoons using the binomial nomenclature system

Carl Linnaeus and Classification

4) Quickly discuss Carl Linnaeus.

  • Use spoons to show how he named items (binomial nomenclature).
  • Ask the children what each type of spoon is (baby spoon, soup spoon, mixing spoon, slotted spoon, etc.)
  • The way Linnaeus would have us name them would be "spoon baby, spoon soup, spoon mixing, spoon slotted, etc."
  • If anyone had other names for 1 spoon (the mixing spoon could also be a cooking spoon or wooden spoon), use that as an example for why he used Latin.
  • Ask what language people speak in Germany, Japan, etc. By using Latin names it allows for scientists in all countries to know what specimen they're discussing.
  • We also used the example of a Florida panther, mountain lion, cougar, & puma.
  • Tell the children that Linnaeus was a Christian and once proclaimed, "God created, Linnaeus ordered." He tried to name an order all living things.
  • Ask, "What 2 groups can you think of that are living?" (plants and animals) Autotrophs (plants) make their own food & heterotrophs (animals) cannot. Linnaeus did place humans in the animal category, but we know from the Bible that humans are not animals.

YOU WILL NEED: various types of spoons: baby spoon, soup spoon, mixing spoon, slotted spoon, etc.

5) Read part of Karl, Get Out of the Garden!: Carolus Linnaeus and the Naming of Everything by Anita Sanchez.

  • Unfortunately the book does not include his spiritual life, which was a large driving force in his studies. If you would like to delve into that and are not limited by time, listen to the section from the Jonathan Park Volume 6 audio CD that describes the visit to the home and museum of Carl Linnaeus. We had the children listen to that part of the CD while the children sketched a picture of him.

YOU WILL NEED: Karl, Get Out of the Garden!: Carolus Linnaeus and the Naming of Everything by Anita Sanchez or other book on Carolus Linnaeus

Classification

6) Read some of a book on classification: Tree of Life by Rochelle Strauss. Skip the first page and skip parts that talk about everything being related. Read only the parts about the kingdoms.

  • Classification is simply a way to put an order to God's creation. It is NOT a way to find relationships between living things.
  • On days 5 & 6 of creation, God created each animal after its own kind. While animals in the same species can reproduce and create different breeds (think in terms of dogs), they will all still be dogs.
  • There is not 1 tree with all living things originating from 1 cell. God created an enormous orchard with each tree being a distinct kind. When we classify animals it's kind of like grouping together fruit trees. You could put the lemon, grapefruit, orange in lemon as all citrus trees.
  • While they share similar character traits, they are all distinctly different trees that were each created by God.

YOU WILL NEED: Tree of Life by Rochelle Strauss or other book on classification

The Book We Used in the Above Activity

taxonomy-animal-classification-and-invertebrates-lesson-plan

Microscopic Kingdoms

7) Show a microscope. Eventually the microscope was discovered and 4 more kingdoms were added. Quickly review the other 4 kingdoms:

  • What differences exist between the kingdoms? (food-production & size) Make sure to note the illustrations of the members of the fungi, protist and moneran kingdoms in the "Tree of Life" book were enlarged quite a bit.
  • Show the picture from the book of the Protist Kingdom. Ask: Who would like to make a guess about the members of this kingdom? Members can be found in pond water. They are the tiny living organisms within it. Protists are like plants or animals in that some make their own food and some don't. Unlike bacteria, protists are complex cells.
  • Show the picture from the book of the Moneran Kingdom, and again ask if anyone would like to make a prediction about its members. Tell them that when they wash their hands, they are hoping to kill members of this kingdom. Ask: Which members could they be? (bacteria, also known as germs) Like protists, some monerans make their own food and some don't.
  • Archae is the most recent kingdom. (This isn't in the book.) It is very similar to bacteria. The members are called archaebacteria.
  • Point out the Fungi Kingdom in the book and show specimens you may have from outside. What do you see in this kingdom that you recognize? (a mushroom) They have all also seen members of the fungus kingdom when they have found something at the back of the refrigerator that has been there too long. What member of the fungus kingdom could this be? (mold) Another member of the fungus kingdom, which also starts with the letter "M" can be found in dark, damp places like basements and showers. What could this be? (mildew) Another you eat every day, because it is an ingredient in bread. (yeast) Unlike plants and animals, members of the fungus kingdom absorb their food from other living or dead things.

YOU WILL NEED: fungi specimens (moldy bread, mushrooms, lichen, moss, etc.) and a microscope

Image credit: http://biology.clc.uc.edu/fankhauser/Labs/Microbiology/Gram_Stain/Gram_stain_images/index_gram_stain_images.html

Image credit: http://biology.clc.uc.edu/fankhauser/Labs/Microbiology/Gram_Stain/Gram_stain_images/index_gram_stain_images.html

Kingdom Monera: Buttermilk Magnified

8) (Optional) Look at bacteria (only if you have access to a microscope with 100x power.) Place a drop of buttermilk with a drop of methylene blue (found in the aquarium section of a pet store) or blue food dye on a microscope slide. What they just saw is an example of bacteria. Bacteria are monerans.

YOU WILL NEED: buttermilk, methylene blue or food dye, microscope slides, & a microscope (with at least 100x)

taxonomy-animal-classification-and-invertebrates-lesson-plan

Kingdom Protista Demo

9) Observe how protists move and eat.

  • Fill a clear glass dish with a small amount of water (just so the bottom is covered). Put in a few drops of food coloring to change the color of the water slightly.
  • Without letting children know what it is, put a drop of oil about the size of a nickel into the dish. Ask, "How could we tell if this thing is alive or not?" (movement, food ingestion, breathing, & reacting to stimuli.)
  • You can test for response to stimulus by putting a couple of drops of liquid next to the blob. With an eyedropper, place about five drops of alcohol at one edge of the oil. Do not name the liquid. "How would you describe what you observed?" Protists and amoebas look like this when they move.
  • To test for eating, place "food," pieces of paraffin (from a candle) and a toothpick about but not touching the blob. Add a few more drops of alcohol on the opposite side. Ask students what information this gives us about whether or not this thing can eat? (You see the blob surround the "food" in small bubbles.) Many protists enclose their food in a bubble, or food vacuole, when they take it into their bodies.
  • Ask, "Do you think this blob is alive or not?"
  • Tell the children what the mystery items were.

YOU WILL NEED: a clear glass dish, food coloring, oil, dropper, rubbing alcohol, paraffin, & a toothpick

Observing pond water under a microscope

Observing pond water under a microscope

Kingdom Protista: Pond Water Magnified

10) Let children look at pond water using magnifying glasses.

  • Place a couple drops of pond water on a microscope slide. Prepare 1 per microscope. Let children look at the protists.
  • (If you don't have access to pond water or want an easier option, you can purchase prepared microscope slides from amazon.com or simply show photos or video clips from your phone or laptop.)

YOU WILL NEED: pond water, magnifying glasses, microscope slides, & a microscope

Showing how yeast buds using a balloon and pom poms

Showing how yeast buds using a balloon and pom poms

Fungi Kingdom: Yeast Cells Budding

11) Show how yeast buds using a balloon.

  • Ahead of time, stretch a balloon so that it inflates easily. Do not tie off the end of the balloon. Insert craft pom poms through the opening in the neck of the balloon. Continue putting the pom poms into the balloon until the balloon is almost full. Inflate the balloon and tie a knot in its neck to keep the air inside.
  • Tape the knotted end of the balloon to the top of the stick. Put the bottom of the stick into the modeling clay. Shape the modeling clay or play-doh so that the stick stands upright.
  • During co-op, show how spores are spread. Stick the balloon with the pin and watch the "spores" spread around the room.

YOU WILL NEED: balloon, lots of craft pom poms, tape, a stick, play-doh or modeling clay, & a pin

Watch Yeast Bud in this Time Lapsed Video Clip

Yeast Cells Magnified

12) Place a drop of the prepared yeast with a drop of methylene blue (found in the aquarium section of a pet store) or blue food dye on a microscope slide. Prepare 1 slide for each microscope you have available.

  • Using the one drop of yeast cells & one drop of blue stain. Look for cells with buds under the microscope.
  • Ask, "What do these buds represent?" (yeast reproduces with buds, so these buds will be new yeast cells)

YOU WILL NEED: dropped, food dye, microscope slides, & a microscope

(*If you would like to spend more time studying fungus and yeast, check out my fun lesson plan on the science of yeast and bread: http://iijuan12.hubpages.com/hub/science-of-yeast-and-bread .)

Five (or Six) Kingdom Supreme pizza

Five (or Six) Kingdom Supreme pizza

Five (or Six) Kingdoms & Supreme Pizza

13) Review the 5 (or 6) Kingdoms again.

  • Give each child a slice of supreme pizza and have them name all the items they can find from each kingdom. Below are some suggested answers they may have.

- Plant kingdom = tomato sauce, herbs, peppers, & olives.
- Animal kingdom = pepperoni/sausage from a pig.
- Fungus kingdom = mushrooms & yeast... & if you left it in the back of the refrigerator for a month, you might have mold.
- Protist kingdom = if someone didn't wash their hands well enough after handling the pond water
- Moneran kingdom = bacteria is actually floating all around, so there is bacteria on the pizza...There would be even more if someone sneezed on the pizza
- Archae kingdom = if the pizza fell into a hot spring, it could get some acrhaebacteria.

  • Think of other types of food that contain members of at least three kingdoms. Possible responses include: shish kebabs, mushroom cheeseburgers, spaghetti with meat sauce, and omelets.
  • Then eat pizza & drink water

YOU WILL NEED: 1-2 supreme pizzas with at least mushrooms, veggies, and some sort of meat, cups for water, napkins, & pizza cutter

taxonomy-animal-classification-and-invertebrates-lesson-plan

Taxonomy & The Animal Kingdom

14) Introduce Taxonomy: Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, & Species.

  • Compare this to what we did when first separating out the groups of items.
  • Go through the classification of a brown squirrel or any other animal. I drew a picture of each of the below descriptions.
  • (If you'd like a picture book that shows the classification breakdown of an animal, use one of the books from the Amazing Science series by Laura Salas such as Mammals, Reptiles, etc. which show the classification of each type of animal class.)

YOU WILL NEED: Either a book from the Amazing Science series or a drawing of the below descriptions:

- Kingdom: Animalia = animal
- Phylum: Chordata = has a backbone
- Class: Mammalia = has a backbone and nurses its young
- Order: Rodentia = has a backbone, nurses its young, and has long, sharp front teeth
- Family: Scuridae = has a backbone, nurses its young, has long, sharp front teeth, and has a bushy tail
- Genus: Tamiasciurus = has a backbone, nurses its young, has long, sharp front teeth, has a bushy tail, and climbs trees
- Species: hudsonicus = has a backbone, nurses its young, has long, sharp front teeth, has a bushy tail, and has brown fur on its back and white fur on its underparts

Mnemonic & Song

15) Show a drawing of "Kings playing chess on fiery green serpents." Tell children that this is a mnemonic device they can use to remember the order of classification. Repeat, "Kings play chess on fiery green serpents" a few times.

YOU WILL NEED: a drawing of the above mnemonic phrase

16) Sing The Six Kingdom Song. If you are teaching only younger children, sing only the first two verses.

The Six Kingdom Song
(Tune: Battle Hymn of the Republic)

Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species
Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species
Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species
Six Kingdom Song

There are six kingdoms of living things. Animals are first.
Some swim, some walk, some talk, some fly in a burst.
One phylum all has backbones. Chordata is their name.
The rest are invertebrates.

There are six kingdoms of living things. Plants come next.
With chloroplasts, they make their food. Autotrophs are quite complex.
They're planted in one spot and the nucleus numbers one.
All plants are living things.

There are six kingdoms of living things. Protists are third.
Protists are very small, you see, they're made of just one cell.
Most move through the water and have a nucleus as well.
Protists are living things.

There are six kingdoms of living things. Monerans are fourth.
They have no nucleus and with flagella they swim.
These are called bacteria and they have one cell, no other limb.
Monerans are living things.

There are six kingdoms of living things. Fungi are fifth.
They don't make food like plants; they absorb it from the ground.
Many fungi reproduce by spreading spores all around.
A fungus is a living thing.

There are six kingdoms of living things. Archae is last.
They have no nucleus and with flagella they swim.
These are called archebacteria and they have one cell from which to skim.
An archae is a living thing.

Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species
Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species
Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species
Six Kingdom Song

YOU WILL NEED: the words to this song written or printed in large print

Model of a spinal cord & backbones

Model of a spinal cord & backbones

Phylum Chordata & Invertebrates

(With or Without Backbones)

17) Have children feel their backbone. We have a backbone and so do the animals in the phylum Chordata. Animals with backbones are in the phylum Chordata.

  • Ask the children to twist and bend. How can they do this if bones are hard? Show a string that has beads on it. The beads represent the disks and the string represents the spinal cord, which connects all the other nerves in our body to our brain. God designed protection for it.
  • Emphasize humans are not animals, but we do share this trait with some animals.
  • The backbone is made up of many bones called vertebrae lined up and connected like beads on a string. Demonstrate the flexibility of the string.
  • Show the vertebrae of a chicken. Point out the hole in the center through which a string of nerves called the spinal cord passes on its way to the animal's brain.
  • All of the animals with backbones have skeletons on the insides of their bodies. Ask if the children can you think of any animals that have skeletons on the outsides of their bodies, exoskeletons. (insects)
  • Are there other animals that have exoskeletons? (crabs,lobsters, spiders, scorpions)
  • What animals were created with no hard skeletons at all? (worms, slugs, jellyfish, squid)
  • What animals were created without backbones, have soft bodies, and have hard shells to protect them? (snail, crab, clam, oyster).
  • Show a picture of invertebrates from the "Tree of Life" book. Do any of these animals have backbones? (no) What are they called? (invertebrate)
  • If they did have backbones, what phylum would they be in? (Chrodata)
  • This other group of animals in the animal kingdom is called invertebrates because these animals have no backbones.
  • Do you think most of the animals in the world are vertebrates or invertebrates? Most of the animals on Earth are invertebrates. Vertebrates make up only 1/20th of the animal life on Earth.

YOU WILL NEED: a string of beads & backbone from a chicken (cook a cooking chicken & save the backbone), & human skeleton model (optional)

Dissecting an Oyster

Dissecting an Oyster

An Invertebrate: Dissecting an Oyster

18) View an Anthropoda/Invertebrate.

  • Pass around a clam, oyster, or mussel. What do you notice? Is this the animal? Is there more to this animal?
  • Open it. We opened an oyster outside on the cement using a hammer and a flat-headed screwdriver.
  • Cut the muscle that connects the two halves together.
  • Is this animal a vertebrate or an invertebrate? (invertebrate) Does anyone know what the name of this invertebrate is? (oyster, clam or mussel)
  • Where do these animals live? (in oceans or bays)
  • The animal has two shells fitted together. Why did God give this creature has a hard shell? (to protect its soft body)
  • Oysters, clams and mussels are in the phylum molluscs.
  • They suck water into their shells and through their gills. The gills work as nets to strain out tiny plant particles and also to take oxygen from the water. Then the water is spit out. This kind of feeding is called filter feeding. Oysters and other filter feeders clean water.
  • Has anyone ever eaten one of these animals?
  • Have the children each feel the soft body inside the shell and the muscle on the back of the shells that held the two halves together.
  • Remind them that a snail slides using a fleshy foot. Molluscs do not move around very much. Oysters and mussels cement themselves to surfaces and stay put. Mussels use strong threads they make to attach themselves to rocks and pilings along the edge of the water.

YOU WILL NEED: a clam, oyster, or mussel (purchased for less than a dollar at the seafood department of our grocery store), a sharp knife, and a hammer and a flat-headed screwdriver

19) Review of what we learned.

Our Favorite Children's Books on the Kings of Living Things and on Invertebrates

Our Favorite Children's Books on the Kings of Living Things and on Invertebrates

  • Mammals: Hairy, Milk-Making Animals by Laura Purdie Salas
  • Amphibians: Water-to-Land Animals by Laura Purdie Salas
  • An Octopus Is Amazing by Patricia Lauber
  • What Lives in a Shell? by Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld
  • Wiggling Worms at Work by Wendy Pfeffer.
  • The Journey Never Taken (Jonathan Park) audio CD set is a wonderful, action-packed Christian audio drama. It begins with Carl Linnaeus and travels through the demise of science including Charles Darwin. It is wonderfully researched and delightful to listen to. We have learned so much and enjoyed every second of it. My 8 and 4 year old sons especially love this! ***We also listened to Jonathan Park Volume 5, which shows how to counteract evolutionary thought in animal classification and see how it all points to our Creator.
  • Benny's Animals and How He Put Them in Order by Millicent E. Selsam is a 60 page storybook about Benny who sorts and organizes everything in his life. He excitedly learns about the animal kingdom and how to categorize its many members into vertebrates and invertebrates. This is a wonderful story, though it does include evolutionary ideas, which we skipped while reading.
  • You Wouldn't Want to Live Without Bacteria! by Roger Canavan
  • Tiny Creatures: The World of Microbes by Nicola Davies
  • God's Amazing Creation: Genesis, Chapters 1 and 2 (Discover 4 Yourself Inductive Bible Studies for Kids) by Kay Arthur is a great inductive Bible study that goes along with this unit. Kids look for key words, draw a picture of what they just read in the Bible, complete word puzzles to review what they just read, and more. We love this series. This is great for ages 7-12.
Observing pond water during Lesson 1: Taxonomy, Animal Classification, and Invertebrates Lesson

Observing pond water during Lesson 1: Taxonomy, Animal Classification, and Invertebrates Lesson

Examine pond water and yeast cells under a microscope, test out various insect mouths, dissect a fish, create an egg model, perform a play about mammals, present on a specific animal phylum or genius, and more during this fun 5 part hands-on unit study on animal classification!

  • Taxonomy, Animal Classification, and Invertebrates Lesson - This is part 1 of a 5 part hands-on unit study on zoology. Examine pond water and yeast cells under a microscope, dissect an oyster, sing “The Six Kingdom Song,” eat 5 of the kingdoms on a supreme pizza, and more!
  • Insects and Spiders Lesson - This is part 2 of a 5 part hands-on unit on zoology. Test out various insect mouth types, examine insect parts under a microscope, make and eat edible ants, test out spider webs for vibration, and more!
  • Amphibians, Reptiles, and Fish (Cold-blooded Vertebrates) Lesson - This is part 3 of a 5 part hands-on unit study on Zoology. Peel your “skin” like a reptile, dissect a fish, make origami jumping frogs, compare amphibian and reptile eggs by feeling tapioca and grapes, and more!
  • Birds Lesson - This is part 4 of a 5 part hands-on unit on zoology. Create an egg model, make edible nests, test out various types of beaks, compare bird bones with mammal bones, examine various feathers, dissect a gizzard, sing a song about bird traits, and more!
  • Mammals Lesson - This is part 5 of a 5 part hands-on unit on zoology. Perform a play about mammals, experience how blubber keeps marine mammals warm, sniff out your “baby,” examine animal skulls, dissect an owl pellet and piece together a rodent skeleton, and more!
  • Zoology Presentations and Field Trip Ideas This describes the culminating activity for the 5 part hands-on unit on zoology. The children each presented on an assigned phylum, class, or order of animals. They also sang some of the animal classification songs and enjoyed an animal-themed meal. (Recipes are included.) Also included are the field trips we attended during this unit.
taxonomy-animal-classification-and-invertebrates-lesson-plan

Looking for All My Lessons?

Over the years I have posted over 40 science and social-studies based unit studies, compromised of more than 170 lessons. The unit studies include the Human Body, Simple Machines, Earth Science, Medieval Period, American Revolution, Pioneer Life, Countries of the World, and many more! For each lesson I have included activities (with photos), our favorite books and YouTube video clips, lapbook links, and other resources. I posted links to all of my unit studies and lessons at Fun, FREE Hands-on Unit Studies .

These videos are not from a Christian perspective, so they do mention evolutionary ideas and include humans as animals.

Learn a bit more about Carl Linnaeus

Konos Volume I

Konos Volume I

KONOS Curriculum

Would you like to teach this way every day?

KONOS Curriculum

I use KONOS Curriculum as a springboard from which to plan my lessons. It's a wonderful Christian curriculum and was created by moms with active children! You can even watch free on-line videos as Jessica, one of the co-authors of KONOS, walks you through a unit. (Look for the Explanation Videos tab.)

© 2011 Shannon

Which Kingdom Is Your Favorite? - Or just let me know you dropped by! I love getting feedback from you!

Shannon (author) from Florida on July 17, 2015:

I'm so glad this will be of help to you! :)

Tracy on July 17, 2015:

This is SO AWESOME! I've been a KONOS mom for years and now using CC. Trying to keep it fun and active! Thank you, thank you, thank you for posting!

Shannon (author) from Florida on June 18, 2013:

@anonymous: Great! I'm so glad you've found my lessons helpful and will be able to use them!

anonymous on June 18, 2013:

Thank you for your awesome ideas on Animal Taxonomy! I am putting together a curriculum for a home school co-op science classroom and can really use your ideas. I will give you credit on my syllabus. I love your ideas!

Shannon (author) from Florida on October 15, 2012:

@anonymous: Thank you!

anonymous on October 15, 2012:

interesting topic nice job thanks for sharing

Shannon (author) from Florida on October 01, 2012:

@Michey LM: Thank you so much!

Shannon (author) from Florida on October 01, 2012:

@RhondaAlbom: Thank you!

Rhonda Albom from New Zealand on October 01, 2012:

Nicely done! Great science lesson. Blessed.

Michey LM on September 30, 2012:

You really are a great teacher, I like the easy flow, the details and resources you offer. Blessings!

Shannon (author) from Florida on September 25, 2012:

@WriterJanis2: Thank you!

WriterJanis2 on September 25, 2012:

Very interesting lesson plan.

Shannon (author) from Florida on September 20, 2012:

@CoolFool83: Thank you!

CoolFool83 on September 20, 2012:

Terrific lense!

Shannon (author) from Florida on September 17, 2012:

@bwet: Thank you so much!!!

Shannon (author) from Florida on September 17, 2012:

@anonymous: Thank you so much!!!

anonymous on September 15, 2012:

Well this is a different science lesson right from the start where we get to sing and have pizza with 5 of the kingdoms on it...what an intro leading into lessons that will be met with excitement for learning...excellent and congratulations on your very well earned purple star!

bwet on September 15, 2012:

what an awesome lens! very well done. deserve being featured!

Shannon (author) from Florida on September 14, 2012:

@anonymous: Thank you!

anonymous on September 14, 2012:

As an interesting read.

Shannon (author) from Florida on September 13, 2012:

@BillyPilgrim LM: Thank you!

BillyPilgrim LM on September 13, 2012:

An interesting hobby, well done x

Shannon (author) from Florida on September 12, 2012:

@anonymous: Spiders & insects are fascinating. Thank you!!!

Shannon (author) from Florida on September 12, 2012:

@thememorybooksh1: Thank you so much!!!

Shannon (author) from Florida on September 12, 2012:

@Close2Art LM: Thank you so much!!!

Close2Art LM on September 12, 2012:

I learned a lot here, Angel Blessings

thememorybooksh1 on September 12, 2012:

Very informative lens...

anonymous on September 12, 2012:

Arthropoda is my favorite one.. :)

Shannon (author) from Florida on September 11, 2012:

@JoshK47: Thank you so much!!!

JoshK47 on September 11, 2012:

Excellent information here, indeed! Thanks so much for sharing! Blessed by a SquidAngel.

Shannon (author) from Florida on September 10, 2012:

@aesta1: Thank you!

Mary Norton from Ontario, Canada on September 10, 2012:

A great science resource. Really useful.

Shannon (author) from Florida on September 07, 2012:

@Melissa Miotke: Thank you so much!

Melissa Miotke from Arizona on September 07, 2012:

Great lesson plans. It seems like these would really engage kids. Blessed!

Shannon (author) from Florida on August 11, 2012:

@mistersquidoo_here: Thank you!

mistersquidoo_here on August 11, 2012:

good lens, very informatif..

coincrazy98 on June 15, 2012:

We've been considering home schooling ours (my wife and I have 5 boys) and your lenses (this one included) are great! Thanks for sharing!

Shannon (author) from Florida on March 07, 2012:

@anonymous: Thank you! The focus of this unit is on zoology. Have you checked out my lesson on plants at https://discover.hubpages.com/education/plant-seed ? The unit was actually longer than one week. The subsequent weeks involved us planting a garden. I just haven't created a lens about that yet.

anonymous on March 07, 2012:

Great ideas. I also love how you have shown that co-ops, Jonathan Park, and Konos can be pulled together into great lessons. I'd like to see how you explore the plant kingdom more

JoyfulReviewer on December 01, 2011:

Very informative resource for more fun learning ... nicely done! Congratulations on having one of the top 35 homeschooling lenses.

dwnovacek on November 24, 2011:

Lots of great information here. Angel Blessed!

Johanna Eisler on November 13, 2011:

Great resources here and great experiments. Good job!

TXMary2 on April 27, 2011:

I am homeschooling boys too. Love your lenses!

anonymous on March 27, 2011:

Great lens!

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