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Colors in Different Cultures

Niina is a folklorist and a storyteller who loves to research and explore myths from all around the world.

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Red, yellow, and blue are the primary colors. Purple, orange, brown, green, and all the tones in between are secondary colors. Because they are not found in the color spectrum, white and black are not recognized as real colors. However, they are present in nature. Because colors have various connotations across civilizations, color symbolism is incredibly fascinating.

colors-in-different-cultures

Blue

The color blue is peaceful and restorative. The color blue is associated with calmness, inspiration, independence, sensitivity, and the realm of dreams. Blue is associated with open expanses and is the color of the sky and the sea. Blue can benefit both our physical and mental health. It may trigger the body to create calming molecules that lower our stress levels. Blue comes in a variety of hues. Indigo blue is utilized to design meditation settings because it is associated with consciousness. The color blue was utilized in folk magic to ward off the evil eye.

To keep evil spirits out, it was traditional in Greece to paint all door and window frames blue.

Once in a blue moon is an idiom used in English to describe extremely unusual occurrences. The phrase "blue moon" refers to a month where the moon is full twice, with the second full moon being referred to as the "blue moon."

Black and blue are vibrant colour combinations that may be found in athletic apparel and the gym. Only white and blue are seen on the flags of Finland and Greece. White represents the sky in the Finnish flag, while blue represents lakes. White and blue represent the sky and the sea, respectively, in the Greek flag.

Blue is a color that has a lot of power. It serves as a heraldic and sincere representation. Blue is a significant hue in religious rites across many cultures. Police officers use blue uniforms because the color blue conveys trust.

colors-in-different-cultures


The phrase "blue moon" refers to a month where the moon is full twice, with the second full moon being referred to as the "blue moon."


Krishna is symbolized with the color blue in Hinduism. one of the most popular Hindu deities who represent joy and love. Blue is the color of sanctity in Judaism. Blue is a representation of purity and hope as well as the color of the Virgin Mary in several Latin American nations. Blue is often used as a metaphor for paradise, mysticism, and immortality in Middle Eastern traditions. Blue foods are not very prevalent. Blue foods, such as blueberries, are incredibly vitamin-rich. The meditation color for weight issues, self-care, and self-love is blue since it is a healing hue.

colors-in-different-cultures

Red

Because blood is red, red is frequently referred to as the color of life. Red is the color of fervor, fire, and vigor. Red is a hue associated with luck, pleasure, and success in China. Chinese brides frequently wear crimson outfits. Red envelopes are given to the newlyweds by family and friends. Although there is money in these envelopes, that is not what matters. The quantity of envelopes, which stands for fecundity, is what matters. Red is associated with aggression and conflict. Red flashes warnings of impending peril. Red is the color of passion. This is why "street of the red lanterns" can be seen in many cities.

Red is a symbol of confidence. Wear red with pride if you want to be recognized.
In India, red is one of the most revered colors and it has numerous symbolic implications. Red is a representation of power, riches, fire, purity, fertility, love, beauty, and seduction in Indian culture. Red is the color of the new year and symbolizes long life in China, whereas it is the color of mourning in South Africa.

colors-in-different-cultures

War and love are often connected together. It is not a coincidence that the colour red is connected to both Cupid and the Christian devil. In politics colour red usually refers to nonconformist groups. Red is the color of love and is connected to Valentine´s Day. The symbol of Valentine´s day is a red heart. In flower symbolism, the red rose represents everlasting passionate love.


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colors-in-different-cultures

Yellow

Yellow is associated with friendship, childhood, the inner child, summer, sunshine, and optimism. The color of attentiveness is vivid yellow. A combination of yellow and black is often used in warning signs. Black and yellow is one of the easiest colour combinations to see long distances. This is why taxis and school buses are painted yellow and black.

Bright yellow combined with a stimulating color like red can make individuals feel really stressed out. This is the reason why many people don't feel comfortable spending a lot of time in spaces that are painted yellow and red. In fast-food establishments, this form of color psychology is frequently applied. Customers are drawn in by color stimulation, yet because of the stimulation, they won't stay in the restaurant for very long.

Yellow is associated with intelligence and memory. Yellow lovers frequently possess strong imaginations. Yellow can also stimulate the neurological system and boost mental activity.


Yellow is associated with intelligence and memory.


The color yellow symbolizes both spring and Easter. Easter symbols like eggs and baby birds are frequently yellow. Daffodils, sunflowers, dandelions, and buttercups are just a few examples of the many yellow spring and summer flowers. Yellow is a representation of the sun and of the closest point of the sun to the earth. Yellow is a natural color and is frequently used in marketing materials and children's items. Yellow is regarded as the color of bravery and valor in Japan. Yellow is the color of traders in India. Gold and yellow are colors associated with death in Egypt. Before entering the afterlife, they were used to decorate the mummies' sarcophagi and tombs.

Due to its striking resemblance to gold, the color yellow is associated with wealth in Africa. Yellow was utilized in folk magic during the midsummer solstice spells. The color yellow can draw in new relationships and interesting occasions.

colors-in-different-cultures

Green

In the natural world, green predominates. Green symbolizes life, Gaia, the earth, trees, happiness, health, growth, fertility, safety, harmony, balance, envy, money, riches, and banking. It is also associated with the summer season, happiness, health, and happiness.

The color green is associated with motherhood, Venus, and the inner child. It is also considered to be fairies' and pixies' favourite color. Green is associated with the spring and summer seasons and represents growth and rebirth. the period when nature is reviving.

Christmas is frequently associated with the color combination of green and red. Additionally, complimentary hues, red and green combined produce bright results.

The phrase "Green-Eyed Monster" describes someone who is envious or jealous.

Green is a color that represents death in several South American traditions.

Men shouldn't don green hats in China. It implies that they are being cheated on by their wives.


The color green is ideal for grounding and self-care. Additionally appropriate for money and prosperity spells are the color green.

Anxiety, despair, and nervousness can all be managed with green. This explains why doctors frequently dress in green and why hospital interiors are decorated in bright colors green. Green is a symbol of both environmental responsibility and safety. It frequently serves to advertise environmentally friendly goods.

Additionally, green might have ominous connotations. Black and green together have long been associated with wicked witches. Green can also represent addiction, tragedy, and jealousy. The absinthe beverage is referred to as the "Green Fairy."


© 2022 Niina Pekantytar

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