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Visual Training and Perception Glasses

George Stratton Experiment

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See the World Through Different Eyes

One day my son Wes was doing his math homework and having difficulty working out the solutions. “Turn the paper sideways or upside down,” I said, “Looking at things differently may help you recall what was covered in class.”

My personal experience had shown me over the last few decades that a change of perspective can allow one to access certain parts of the brain, opening up new thought processes or retrieving old memories.

Being creatures of habit we tend to think the same thoughts over and over again, sort of digging ourselves into a rut. Sometimes we just need to look at things differently.

Having done my paternal deed for the day, I headed off to the couch to reward myself with an afternoon power-nap, little aware that I would be waking up to a whole new world of ideas.

After about 20 minutes, I woke up with a start. The words - See The World Through Different Eyes echoed in my mind as a rush of ideas came to me at lightning speed.

Reverse the eyes’ left and right fields of view. Wouldn’t that be a change of perspective? The left hemisphere of the brain controls the right side of the body and the right hemisphere controls the left side of the body. People tend to be left-oriented or right-oriented when one side of the brain is dominant: right-brained (creative) or left-brained (analytical). Wouldn’t the change of perspective help integrate the two different functions? Would that make one who is normally in the creative right brain mode better able to access the analytical left brain? It would take mirrors or prisms....if we arranged them like this...

This was the beginning of over a year and a half of ideas, research, writing, and experiences that have truly reminded me to constantly see the world through different eyes.

Swaptacles: Visual Training and Perception Glasses Brief

• Swaptacles swap portions of the visual field fusing them before the optic chiasm and doing to near and far what a mirror does to left and right. This produces interesting optical illusions.

• Swaptacles enhances normal visual information processing by acting upon all the areas related to vision, including the neurological, physiological, and psychological relationships.

• Swaptacles “re-wires” the brain, creating new neural pathways and strengthening old ones connecting the left and right hemispheres and other areas of the brain related to visual processing.

• Swaptacles improves whole-brain integration through improved relationship between left and right hemispheres.

• Swaptacles, along with ocular exercises, may be used to improve visual disorders such as dyslexia and other reading and tracking problems.

• Swaptacles, along with a visual therapy system improves the ability to see and process visual information.

Background

The object of the present invention is to provide a visual therapy system and method to improve the neuron transmission of impulses related to visual processing.

Swaptacles does to near and far what a mirror does to left and right. That is, the foreground recedes to the background and the background advances to the front. Objects in the background appear to be in front of objects closer to the observer. Concave becomes convex and spinning objects appear to be spinning in the opposite direction.

In 1969 Derstin Hoeller repeated a 19th century experiment by George Stratton. He wore a pair of glasses similar to Swaptacles which turned everything upside down until his visual pathways “re-wired“ and he saw everything right side up again. When the glasses were removed, everything reverted to upside down again. It took several hours to get back to “normal.“ Swaptacles have the same ability to “re-wire“ the brain. While adjustments are being made to adapt to the new visual input, new neural pathways are created and existing neuro-pathways in the entire visual system are strengthened.

Moreover, the new neural pathways and strengthening of the visual pathways improves whole-brain integration. This leads to improved relationship between left/right hemispheres.

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How It Works

I have provided a diagram with the left and right hemifields represented along with perimetry circles, eyes, and the left and right hemispheres of the brain. The notations TR and NR are meant to be temporal retina and nasal retina. An L or an R in front of that would be left or right (LTR, RTR, LNR, RNR).

In looking at the simplified diagram, we note that the view of the left side of the world is handled by the right side of the brain, and the view of the right side of the world is handled by the left side of the brain.

We further note that each eye has 2 portions of the retina, nasal and temporal retina, which normally are acted upon something like this:

Light reflected from the right side of an object enters the left eye and is focused, inverted, and directed to the temporal retina. Light reflected off of the right side of an object also enters the right eye and is focused, inverted, and directed to the nasal retina. Light reflected from the left side of an object enters the left eye, is focused, inverted, and falls upon the nasal retina. Light reflected from the left side of an object enters the right eye, is focused, inverted, and falls upon the temporal retina.

There is an overlap of fields seen by LTR and RTR crossing in the center of the hemifield. Besides being crucial for binocular vision, this crossover of fields aids the eye in covering for the blind spot, caused by the optic disc “pushing aside“ light receptors where the optic nerve connects to the retina. The brain uses whatever it finds around the blindspot to fill in the details not covered by that overlap. The brain also transfers missing data from one hemisphere to the other via the corpus callosum.

There is a point below the eyes in the diagram where optic fibers from LNR and RNR cross over the optic chasm and optic fibers from LTR and RTR remain on the same side of the brain.

These each head to their lateral geniculate nucleus LGN (one for the left eye and one for the right eye--not shown in the diagram). Here layers containing ocular dominance cells set themselves up to respond to input from one eye or the other. This is done through alternate layers (L-R-L-R-L-R).

Because the pathway (optic fibers) from the nasal retinas cross over at the chasm and the pathway from the temporal retinas do not, visual input reaches the visual cortex from the temporal retinas first.

Observe the diagram once again. On either side at the bottom of the page is seen a box labeled mirror view and opposite view. What I am saying here is that depending on the arrangement of the prisms and or mirrors used in Swaptacles, the effect can be made to imitate what I call mirror view or opposite view.

Let's look at that which is labeled opposite view first. You will see LTR- >RTR and LNR->RNR. This means that with Swaptacles, what light normally is "seen" by the left temporal retina is "sent" by Swaptacles to the right temporal retina. Also, what is normally seen by the left eye's nasal retina is seen by the right nasal retina. This arrangement would be like swapping views of the eye from one side to the other.

To illustrate this let me use this example. Hold up four fingers on one hand in front of you. Now turn your hand over.

Now, let's look at the box on the right labeled mirror view. You see there LTR- >RNR and RTR->LNR. By this I mean that with Swaptacles the light normally seen by the left eye's temporal retina is diverted to the right eye's nasal retina, and the light normally entering the right and falling on the temporal retina is diverted to the left eye's nasal retina. We can demonstrate this idea: Hold up two fingers on both hands and hold them out in front of you. Now turn over your right hand, and also turn over your left hand.

By swapping portions of the visual field in our mirror view scenario, ocular dominance cells in the LGN which normally receive input from one eye will receive input from the other eye. With cells not firing in response to the new input, the brain wants to fill in the blanks, and so it retrieves the missing data from the opposite hemisphere and this is delivered, at least in part, by way of the corpus collosum. Ocular dominance cells that normally respond only to one eye apparently “learn“ to respond to stimulus from the other eye.

There is normally an adjustment period of about one week when one literally begins to “see the world through different eyes.“ The building and strengthening of neuro-pathways (magno-cellular visual pathways) and whole-brain integration occurs.

In Conclusion

The Visual Training and Perception Glasses along with ocular exercises and other visual therapy may also be used to improve visual disorders relating to behavioral visual blockage patterns such as ADD/ADHD, dyslexia, and other reading and tracking problems.

Swaptacles improves the neuron transmission of impulses related to visual processing including stereopsis, binocular coordination, eye alignment, eye teaming, eye focusing, and eye movement (both versional and vergence ocular motor patterns).

Moreover, Swaptacles enhances normal visual information processing by acting upon both inhibitory and initiatory areas of the brain and relating to the neurological, physiological, and psychological relationships between the visual cortex areas, retina, visional projection fields, controlling oculo-motor nerves, and other visually related areas used in visual processing information.

Researchers, manufacturing representatives or other interested persons may contact me to see a working prototype.

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