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Top 10 Animals That Went Extinct

The Megalodon is One of the most Fearsome animal

The Megalodon is One of the most Fearsome animal

Megalodon

The megalodon is one of the most famous and notorious megafauna. Although its existence is controversial, it is known for being the largest known predator in history. The megalodon was a large, prehistoric, killing machine that lived during the Pleistocene Epoch. This animal's extinction is one of the most debated topics in history.

What led to the megalodon's extinction? Many factors led to the extinction of the megalodon. Some of these include the changing climate, the growth of other predators, and changes in the food chain. Changes in the food chain lead to the decline of the megalodon because it could not compete with other predators for food. The megalodon was also at a disadvantage because it ate large prey, which made it a target for other predators.






This picture was taken on 2 January 1921, By Hobart Zoo

This picture was taken on 2 January 1921, By Hobart Zoo

Tasmanian tiger

Also known as thylacine or tiger shark, was a marsupial predator that once roamed across much of mainland Australia. It went extinct in the late 20th century after continuous human persecution and habitat loss. The thylacine's extinction has been described variously as an ecological disaster, one of the greatest animal extinctions ever documented and one of the world's worst conservation failures.

The extinction of the Tasmanian tiger is the result of many factors, but the key one is the human threat. Overhunting and loss of habitat have virtually decimated the population. In addition, human-wildlife interaction has led to major health problems for the Tasmanian tiger. These problems include collisions with cars, disease, and predation by foxes and feral cats.



Model of Homo neanderthalensis elder man in The Natural History Museum, Vienna

Model of Homo neanderthalensis elder man in The Natural History Museum, Vienna

Neanderthal

The Neanderthal is a human species that primarily inhabited Europe and the Middle East between 40,000 and 28,000 years ago. The neanderthals were succeeded by modern humans who began migrating out of Africa about 60,000 years ago. Neanderthals are often considered to be an archaic human form because they had smaller brains than Homo sapiens—an average difference was around 1 500cc according to some estimates although this has since been disputed as there is no agreed-upon measure for brain size across different populations or evolutionary stages. Scientists believe that the Neanderthals were susceptible to extinction because they were not as adaptable as other human species. Neanderthals were physiologically and behaviorally different from other human species. Their body shapes, muscle development, and bone structure were different. Their skin was also thicker and more muscular. These features made them less likely to survive in changing environments. Neanderthals are believed to have died out around 30,000 years ago, due to competition from other human species, such as the Homo sapiens.

Woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius)

Woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius)

Woolly mammoth

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Mammuthus primigenius is an extinct species of elephant that lived during the Pleistocene epoch, about 2.6 million years ago to 10,000 years ago in North America and Eurasia. Woolly mammoths were one of the most impressive creatures on Earth due to their large size and thick coat of fur. The woolly mammoth is an extinct species of Mammoth that inhabited the colder parts of North America, Europe, and Asia from the Pliocene Epoch until about 4,000 years ago. They are well known for their thick fur coats, which helped them keep warm in winters. The woolly mammoth was browsed by Paleolithic humans and had a considerable impact on their cultures, as most stone tools found at Paleolithic archaeological sites are made from mammoth bone. The woolly mammoth's extinction is closely linked to the arrival of the Anglo-Saxon people in Britain in the 5th century AD.

Half-sized model of a triceratops in a fern forest (Great Otway National Park, Australia).

Half-sized model of a triceratops in a fern forest (Great Otway National Park, Australia).

Triceratops

Triceratops was a herbivore dinosaur that inhabited North America around 65 million years ago. The triceratops was one of the largest land animals that ever lived. This animal was characterized by its three horns on its head and its long tail. The triceratops was an impressive sight. It weighed around two and a half tons. The triceratops inhabited North America around 65 million years ago. It lived during the late Cretaceous period, around 73 to 66 million years ago. Triceratops is now considered an iconic species because of its large size and impressive horns.



Pyrenean ibex

Pyrenean ibex

The Pyrenean ibex

Pyrenean ibex was a wild goat-like Antilope found in the mountains of north-central Spain and southern France and was once abundant throughout much of Europe, from Portugal to Poland. In 1986, there were an estimated 4500 living in the Pyrénées Mountains; by 2002 that number had dwindled to just over 1000 animals. The reasons for their decline are largely human caused: livestock farming has displaced natural vegetation where they grazed; forestry has reduced nearby hillsides into dense clumps unsuitable for browsing or grazing; roads and other infrastructure fragment habitats further.... Pyrenean ibex is thought to be the oldest subspecies of the European ibex. This ibex had a long lifespan and can live up to 25 years old. They are also thought to be relics of the Pleistocene epoch, meaning that they are the last of a kind. Pyrenean ibex live in high-altitude areas and because of this, they are very susceptible to threats.



Stegosaurus and Allosaurus - a painting after Zdenek Burian on display at the Sofia University "St. Kliment Ohridski" Museum of Paleontology and Historical Geology

Stegosaurus and Allosaurus - a painting after Zdenek Burian on display at the Sofia University "St. Kliment Ohridski" Museum of Paleontology and Historical Geology

Allosaurus

The allosaurus is an extinct species of theropod dinosaurs that lived in North America during the late Cretaceous Period. It was one of the largest land animals ever to walk on Earth and weighed up to sixty-six tonnes, making it one of the strongest predators known from this period. The extinction of this animal has been a matter for debate for many years, with various theories proposing different reasons for its disappearance. The allosaurus was one of the most fearsome dinosaurs that ever lived. It was massive, with a skull that broader than a human's and enormous teeth. the allosaurus was active during the Late Cretaceous period, which is around 65.5 to 66.5 million years ago. At the time, North America, Europe and Africa were joined together, so there was continuous competition for resources.



Aepyornis maximus

Aepyornis maximus

Elephant bird

The elephant bird is a tropical bird that was once abundant in Southeast Asia and parts of South Asia. The elephant bird (Aepyornis maximus) is an extinct genus of bird that was endemic to Madagascar. It was one of the two largest birds ever known, along with the cassowary. The elephant bird probably weighed about a ton and had a wingspan up to 3 meters (9.8 ft). Although it is now extinct, specimens have been found as recently as 2002–2004 on several occasions in captivity or nature reserves

Skeleton cast and model of dodo at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, made in 1998 based on modern research

Skeleton cast and model of dodo at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, made in 1998 based on modern research

Dodo

The dodo was an extinct species of bird that lived on Mauritius and Rodrigues. The dodo is considered to be the first modern extinction because it became extinct due to human activity. The dodo was once a common sight on these islands, but its population began decreasing rapidly starting in 1662. It is believed that the main reason for their demise was from humans hunting them down for food or their feathers which were used as clothes by sailors at the time. But its population dwindled over time due to a variety of factors including overhunting, introduced predators and changed environmental conditions. Many people believe that the dodo's extinction was partially caused by human activity, and its demise provides us with an opportunity to learn and prevent similar extinctions in the future.



The Baji

The Baji

Baji

The baji animal was a type of wild ox that once roamed the plains of Asia. The main cause for the extinction of the baji animal was poaching for its meat and horns. Poached animals are often sold on black marketplaces or used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The baji animal was previously known as the Asianless water buffalo, and is widely considered as the best swimmer in the animal kingdom. The reason for the extinction of the baji animal is the excessive hunting of the animals for their skin and meat. The animals used to be hunted using traditional methods such as catapulting them into water until they drowned, or capturing them by lassoing their neck. Nowadays, the animals are hunted using rifles. This has led to the extinction of the baji animal in most parts of its original distribution. There are still some small populations of the baji animal living in India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka. The baji animal is now listed as an endangered species on the IUCN Red List.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2022 Robera Diriba Bk

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