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The Sinking of the Titanic

Marcy writes about American life, holidays, politics and other topics. She has written hundreds of articles for online & print publications.

The Titanic sank on her maiden voyage

The famous ship Titanic at sea in 1912.

The famous ship Titanic at sea in 1912.

The Titanic sank in 1912

It has now been more than 100 years since the Titanic sank, and yet a century later, the disaster remains legendary. Even for those of us born many decades after the tragedy, the sinking of the Titanic defines man-made disasters, human error and hubris, and has spawned terms and phrases still used in today’s society. It has become a benchmark of sorts to remind us we are, after all, small humans on a planet that has powers we don’t yet understand, and that nothing, no matter how advanced and how publicly touted by experts, is perfect.

Many who grew up in the 1960s first learned about the disaster by watching the 1958 film, A Night to Remember, as kids, huddled around the television set and asking their parents what the movie was about. Was it true? The answer was often a grim acknowledgement that the horrific event was indeed a true story, even if dramatized. The 1958 film remains a classic, despite portraying the event more somberly and with less romance than the 1997 Titanic movie (called, quite simply, Titanic), which was the first film to gross more than $1 billion, and remained the highest grossing film for more than a decade.

The 2,224 people who were on the Titanic when it pushed off the pier in Southampton, England on April 10, 1912 were likely giddy with excitement and pride to be on the newest and most celebrated ship of the White Star Line. For more than two years, the public had heard of its sumptuous fittings and magnificent, state-of-the-art engineering. The trend at White Star at the time was to christen its fleet with impressive names, so the mammoth vessel was named the RMS Titanic, joining its sister ship, RMS Olympic, which had been launched nearly two years early.

Hundreds, if not thousands of stories have been written about the size of the ship (it was indeed titanic in size), its gigantic engines and screws, and its alleged ability to withstand a head-on collision and the flooding of up to four front compartments without sinking (there is no record, however, that the ship's owners or builders ever used the word ‘unsinkable’). The links at the bottom of this hub will lead you to stories with details of its design and information on what appears to be substandard, brittle metal used in its construction.

The Titanic at dock before sailing

The "Unsinkable Titanic" as she prepared to sail.

The "Unsinkable Titanic" as she prepared to sail.

Why did the Titanic sink?

It is now part of our collective knowledge that the ship came upon an iceberg four days after its launch, and didn’t properly avoid it. Apparently, wireless warnings were set aside or ignored while personal messages to wealthy passengers were expedited in the communications office. That ill-planned shift of priorities was one of several things that historians have pondered with sad questions that begin, "What if . . .?" Just about everything else that could go wrong went wrong on the night of April 14th and 15th, when the ship sank.

At 11:40 p.m. the night of the 14th, the deadly mass of iceberg was sighted. An immediate alarm was sounded and the crew jumped into action. What happened next was part of the series of mistakes, but given the rapidly approaching collision, disaster may have been unavoidable at that point. Rather than attempting to hit the iceberg head-on (which may have flooded only four compartments and perhaps avoided or delayed sinking), the bridge ordered a quick turn to the left (starboard). About 37 seconds after the alarm was sounded, the weight and momentum of the giant vessel pushed its side along a jutting edge of the iceberg, ripping a long tear in the starboard side, crushing several spots in its hull and bursting underwater rivets from their seams. With six front compartments flooded, rather than only four, the ship’s officers soon realized the ship would not survive. Only four days into its wildly heralded maiden voyage, the Titanic was going down.

Inside the luxury liner Titanic

An elegant interior scene in the Titanic.

An elegant interior scene in the Titanic.

The magnificent staircase in the First Class area of the Titanic.

The magnificent staircase in the First Class area of the Titanic.

Interior of a stateroom in the Titanic.

Interior of a stateroom in the Titanic.

Did the Titanic passengers know they would die?

Examine for moment a the disbelief every individual on board would have felt in the immediate aftermath of hitting the iceberg. Surely, all 2,224 of those who sailed felt they were on the safest, most modern and exciting ship ever built.

Aside from the thrill of being on one of the most celebrated maiden voyages ever seen in commercial maritime history, the passengers and crew would have felt a sense of peace and security knowing their ship was nearly invincible.

The size of the vessel alone was comforting; if you’ve ever seen a cruise ship in a port, you know how monumentally enormous they are. It would have been nearly incomprehensible that anything could destroy something of that size. Or that something so large and fortress-like could be tragically vulnerable to Mother Nature.

Everything in the ship was brand new and pristine for its first voyage. The wood still glistened with its first oil and polish; the brass was blindingly bright and unsullied by fingerprints. Although steerage passengers certainly traveled in minimal comfort compared to the luxuries seen in first-class cabins, even those who paid the least amount for passage found they were on the most amazing ship ever imagined, and they felt secure in its size and power.

It's fair to assume that after four days at sea, the sense of security would have lulled passengers and crew into complacency, their minds far from the idea of a danger. It was unthinkable that anything could happen to mar this idyllic journey, and even more unimaginable that the journey would end in a disaster to be talked about for a century.

Archival footage of the Titanic disaster and aftermath

Titanic lifeboat and survivors

Historic photo of survivors of Titanic huddled in lifeboat.

Historic photo of survivors of Titanic huddled in lifeboat.

Remnant of the Titanic's only voyage and brief time at sea.

Remnant of the Titanic's only voyage and brief time at sea.

The last moments before the Titanic sank

With alarm bells sounding in the dark midnight air, imagine the frantic scurrying of crew members as they tried to deploy lifeboats, with little in the way of pre-training for such emergencies. It would have been challenging to man lifeboat stations amid the throngs of passengers just awakened from sleep - all of them confused and scared, their minds filled with terror as they tried to decide where to turn for help or where to take their families for safety.

Anyone who has been on a huge cruise ship knows how disorienting the hallways and decks are; every passageway looks the same, and even after four days at sea, it must have been difficult to understand what to do, especially while still processing the stunning knowledge of what was happening to the ship. The secure cocoon these 2,224 men, women and children had traveled in for four days had betrayed their trust; it had become a deadly metal coffin, soon to be filled with ice-cold water.

Of the 2,224 onboard when the ship embarked on the voyage, 1,316 were passengers and 908 were crew (only 23 crew members were female). Fewer than a third of those on board (710; just 32%) survived. Many of those in the lifeboats dropped into the frigid water watched the ship sink less than three hours after the iceberg was struck, their hearts breaking with the horrific knowledge that spouses, parents, children or other loved ones were among the 1,514 who were lost.

As the SOS calls went out, the Carpathia, the closest ship to respond to the radioed calls for help, heroically raced to the site. We can picture the tense nerves of her captain and crew as they feverishly coaxed their vessel to the maximum safe speed in an effort to arrive on time. Seafarers are a fraternity – every ship captain and every crew member knows that despite years of experience and skill, nature and her oceans are vast and mighty; disaster can happen in an instant, and the grace of God and good fortune are important passengers on each voyage.

How terrified Captain Arthur Rostron, of the Carpathia, must have felt for the passengers and crew of a ship he had likely never seen, but surely knew of through news stories. How urgently he wanted to arrive in time to offer safety to a few thousand people now at the mercy of the ocean he sailed. Rostron’s ship was part of White Star’s rival fleet, the Cunard Line, but industrial competition isn’t a factor when human lives are in danger on the ocean.

Although it was only 58 miles away, it would take about four hours for the Carpathia to arrive – too late to save all but those who had successfully evacuated into lifeboats. How many ‘what if’ and ‘if only’ thoughts must have tortured Rostron and his crew as they loaded the shivering survivors onto the safety of their decks and began the unbearably sad voyage to New York. If only he had been steering closer to the Titanic’s path before the emergency was sounded, if only he had seen danger and warned his colleagues on the Titanic. If only. What if?

Compilation of historical facts and answered questions about the Titanic

Maritime lessons from the Titanic

The loss of the Titanic has come to symbolize tragedy on a massive level and its lessons even live on in management lore. Who among us hasn’t heard the phrase that some corporate exercises are so futile, they're like ‘rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic?

Despite the somewhat accurate analogy of trying to stop an unavoidable disaster when it’s too late, those words sound a bit cavalier when we consider the human lives and the terror that surged through victims' souls during those few predawn hours on April 15th, 1912.

No movie, documentary or news story could ever capture the shock, emotional trauma and fear of those who experienced a maritime accident so phenomenally unexpected (and one so unprepared for) that its memory lives in our culture almost as though it were only last year.

As the we continue to research and study the Titanic disaster, let us never forget these were real humans who experienced this historic disaster.

Comments

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 25, 2012:

You are quite welcome, JamaGenee! Your hub is outstanding; I'm glad your comments here helped prompt you to write it!

Joanna McKenna from Central Oklahoma on April 25, 2012:

Thanks for the link and thanks for writing THIS hub, which was the inspiration for turning a comment into a full-fledged hub!

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 24, 2012:

Thanks, JamaGenee - your hub is outstanding! I've added a link above, and I hope everyone reads the excellent information you've given about the Titanic as well as the Italian Contra Concordia.

Joanna McKenna from Central Oklahoma on April 24, 2012:

Marcy, it's done and up at https://hubpages.com/politics/Why-the-Titanic-Sank...

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 24, 2012:

Note to readers here - JamaGenee posted some fantastic facts about design flaws and other issues that contributed to the Titanic's sinking. Because her comments will make an excellent hub, she and I agreed to remove them from this thread so they could be published as a separate article. I will be linking to it - and I'm looking forward to sharing it with everyone here!

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 16, 2012:

Thank you, John, for your kind words! And I agree - the arrogance is still our Achilles Heel. Great point (sad, but so accurately made!).

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 16, 2012:

You are so right about the changes the Titanic incident prompted, Marntzu. I watched A Night to Remember the other evening (which I hadn't seen in many years), and they actually mention those things at the end of the movie. Your reference to the flares is spot on - evidence shows they must not have sent up the colored flares that would have let people know they were in trouble.

Thanks so much for your comments here!

johnwindbell from - the land of beards and buggies on April 15, 2012:

Yes, we have learned allot from this mistake. But we still have that deadly 'Titanic Arrogance' in us!

Beautiful hub page, thank you.

Marntzu on April 15, 2012:

a lot of modern naval and shipping safety regulations came about from this tragedy. For example it was not required for a ship to have your radio on at all times before the Titanic sank nor where there standard distress flare colors. The California and several other vessels passed within visual range and where much closer then the Carpathia when she responded. But they believed due to Titanic having the wrong color distress flares for US waters that she was simply having a party and continued on their way. their radio's not turned on as it was outside their normal radio dispatch times. also standardized lifeboat to crew and passenger ratio's came about from the Titanic's sinking.

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 15, 2012:

Many thanks, ishwaryaa, for reading, commenting and sharing. I think many of us have sent up prayers for those who were there as we remebered the event these past few days.

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 15, 2012:

Thanks, brave warrior - I watched A Night to Remember last night, and all I could think of were the emotions of those who were part of that tragedy. I so appreciate your comments here!

Ishwaryaa Dhandapani from Chennai, India on April 15, 2012:

An extremely well-written hub on one of the world's most famous ship tragedies! The way you described the events are detailed and immaculate. I could feel these unfortunate victims' feelings! Well-said!

Thanks for SHARING. Beautiful, Awesome & Interesting. Voted up & Socially Shared.

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 15, 2012:

Thanks for the point about the fire, Vaderleelie - I'd heard brief details, but not the full story. I will check it out, in case it should be included here. I've also seen a few hubs about a theory that White Star swapped out the Titanic for it's sister ship (Olympic), because it had been badly damaged, and the theory postulates that it was deliberately sunk. Supposedly, the Californian was on standby to effect a rescue, but communication was botched. It's a horrific thing to contemplate, but after the duplicity we've seen by major firms such as Enron, who's to say?

Thanks so much for reading and commenting!

Shauna L Bowling from Central Florida on April 15, 2012:

Wonderful piece, Marcy! It's refreshing to see an accounting of this tragedy from an emotional aspect. And, as always, so well written! Your words sent my mind back to that day and into the souls, minds of the passengers. That, my lady, is what makes a great writer!

Voted up!

Vanderleelie on April 15, 2012:

A recent CBC television show about the sinking of Titanic stated that it was actually a smoldering fire in the coal storage bin that weakened the structure of the ship and made the impact of the iceberg more damaging. The fire was already in progress when the ship left Southampton, and was impossible for the crew below decks to extinguish. Your emphasis on the emotional aspects of the tragedy from the perspective of the passengers is clearly communicated.

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 15, 2012:

Thanks so much, Emilybee - I'm fascinated with the story of that event, too, as you can tell! I saw news excepts of historic displays all over the world (including a reproduction of the Grand Staircase in Tennessee!). It would be very interesting to tour a replica of some portion of the ship, to get a feel for the grandeur in person. I hope you do a review of the movie for us! I hope to see it, too, and I'd love to see your opinion of it!

emilybee on April 15, 2012:

Your hub is so nicely organized, like always! Great job compiling this. I love everything about Titanic, well, except for the sinking. It was such a gorgeous boat and I love the history behind it. I was watching some Titanic history on the History channel and I'll probably end up seeing the new version of Titanic in 3D in theaters. Excellent hub :)

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 14, 2012:

Good morning, Epigramman! I'm so glad you like the hub - I woke up today thinking about this event, and thought your group might want to think about A Night to Remember, too. I plan to watch that one tonight - we will always have opportunities to see the more recent masterpiece, but that historic movie is so special. Thanks for commenting here!

epigramman on April 14, 2012:

Good morning Marcy from lake erie time ontario canada 10:43am and I am so very glad you posted this most essential and well reseached hub subject and story to our fb music and cinema group - or else I would have posted it myself - lol - and sending you warm wishes and good energy ...

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 14, 2012:

Thanks so much, Dim F - somehow, I feel like this weekend should be a quiet time of meditation for those victims. It's as though they represent all those who have been lost in tragic events. Many thanks for reading and commenting!

Dim Flaxenwick from Great Britain on April 14, 2012:

That has to be one of the most Wonderfully wrtten account of a well known story.

You captured the human tory as well as reminding us that Mother Nature can be a tough enemy sometimes.

Beautiful, awesome hub. Loved it.

Thank you.

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 14, 2012:

The early movie fascinated me, Ravinder - much more than the Hollywood-ized drama done more recently. It's a beautiful and artistic movie, but the first one was more straightforward and, for me, depicted what happened rather than wrapping us up in a romance and period clothes. Either way, it's on my mind this weekend.

Thanks for your comments!

Ravinder Mann on April 14, 2012:

Excellent article.

I'm one of the few individuals who doesn't care much for the Titanicmania hype; nevertheless, as a child in the 7th grade, the Titanic was the first historical event that fascinated me. I remember reading this book that detailed the entire episode....

Take care - voted

Ravinder Mann

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 07, 2012:

Thanks, Suzanno - I also get tears when I envision what happened on that night. I will read your article - thanks for stopping by and commenting!

tesslyn suzanne from kerala, India on April 07, 2012:

Excellent article.

it definitely is one of the most deadliest disasters of a lifetime.

the panic, the loss they had to face puts us in tears even now .

i had done a survey on this topic and on some breathtaking conclusions i had written an article . check it out

https://hubpages.com/education/THE-LIE-BEHIND-TITA...

John Sarkis from Winter Haven, FL on April 07, 2012:

Excellent article.

I'm one of the few individuals who doesn't care much for the Titanicmania hype; nevertheless, as a child in the 7th grade, the Titanic was the first historical event that fascinated me. I remember reading this book that detailed the entire episode....

Take care - voted up

John

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 07, 2012:

Hi, John - thanks for you comments! I think you and I have the same approach - a fascination without quite the spin that's been put on it?

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 07, 2012:

Thank you so much for reading and commenting, Levertis! It is humbling to realize that as huge as ships are (and other man-made structures), the world is much more vast than we realize.

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 07, 2012:

Thanks, Amymarie, for your kind comments, and for reading and sharing!

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 07, 2012:

For some reason, I like it better - it has less of the added subplots and other ekemts, which gives it more the feel of a dramatized documentary. The later movie, however, is stunning, and depicts elements of what probably happened when the ship tilted (the dishes falling) and flooded. Let me know if you track it down, Sunshine!

John Sarkis from Winter Haven, FL on April 07, 2012:

Hi Marcy, excellent article!

I'm probably one of the few who doesn't care much for the whole Titanicmania - movie and hipe; nevertheless, I remember as a child that the Titanic was the first historical event that fascinated me. I was 7th grade when I read a book that detailed the entire event and became infatuated by the whole thing.

voted up

John

Levertis Steele from Southern Clime on April 07, 2012:

Awesome! Well done.

"It has become a benchmark of sorts to remind us we are, after all, small humans on a planet that has powers we don’t yet understand, and that nothing, no matter how advanced and how publicly touted by experts, is perfect."

How true!

Amy DeMarco from Chicago on April 07, 2012:

You are a very good writer. I felt the people of the Titanic come alive around me when reading your hub. It's such a tragic part of history and the really sad thing was that the lost lives could have easily been prevented. I rated this up, interesting, useful and shared with my followers.

Linda Bilyeu from Orlando, FL on April 07, 2012:

I know I must have seen the 1958 movie. I just can't remember it! I'll keep you posted:)

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 07, 2012:

Many thanks, molometer - it makes us wonder, of the many huge disasters in history, why this one stays in our minds so strongly. I appreciate your comments. I know we will all be thinking of the event this week.

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 07, 2012:

Thanks, Sunshine - it really is a compelling piece of history, isn't it? If you ever get a chance, watch the 1958 movie; I'd love your take on it! Thanks for commenting!

Micheal from United Kingdom on April 07, 2012:

It is incredible how some events leave such a scar on history. The 'what if's' can go on forever.

Good work Marcy.

Voted up and interesting.

Linda Bilyeu from Orlando, FL on April 07, 2012:

I have been obsessed with the history of the Titanic. I watched the movie over 10 times, but I won't see the 3D movie. In my opinion James Cameron has to let it go. All those people who lost their lives is a darn shame. An excellent tribute hub!

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on April 06, 2012:

What a kind comment, great stuff; please do write a hub - there are so very many ways to honor those who perished, and to remind us of the things that could have been or should have been. I hope you'll write your thoughts on it, too. Please let me know, so I can read and comment. There are dozens of hubs about various topics, and each writer sees things in new ways.

Thanks for reading and commenting here - I hope I can repay your kindness.

Mazlan from Malaysia on April 06, 2012:

Hi Marcy, you know what? A few days ago, a friend reminded me of the Titanic that sank 100 years ago and I thought that would be a good hub to work on. So this morning I decided to start on the research work. Fortunately I also wanted to make sure that there's no duplicate hub. Came across yours and I decided to drop this subject. Your write up on the Titanic is superb and I don't think I could have done better. You have done a good job. Voted up. Thanks for sharing

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on March 30, 2012:

Jacob - thanks for the tip! I think we will see many touching tributes in the next few weeks. It's amazing the degree to which the Titanic tragedy still captures our minds and hearts. Many thanks for reading and commenting.

Jacob Echeverria on March 29, 2012:

See Titaniac Boston in memory of John Harper (you tube)

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on February 27, 2012:

Blessings to you, too, Sparklea! Thanks for your sweet comments - I am happy you liked the hub! If you ever get a chance to see "A Night to Remember," it's well worth the view. Not nearly as long, and a completely different feel to the movie. Sort of interesting to compare the two.

Sparklea from Upstate New York on February 27, 2012:

Hi Marcy, WOW! TERRIFIC research and pictures. I've been thumbing through a lot of Titanic books (last week) at Barnes & Noble. It is SO EERIE. I saw the 1997 movie about 3 times and bought the VHS...now will have to get it on Blu Ray...Can't WAIT till it comes out in April...I think in 3D. Whenever I see Leonardo DiCaprio I think of the Titanic...that was HIS movie. I'll try to get the older version too. So appreciate the time and effort you put into your hubs. Phenomenal! Blessings, Sparklea :)

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on February 25, 2012:

Thank you, Dolores - I agree; this piece of history has captured our emotions and curiosity for a century now, and will likely continue to. It's interesting to note, since there have been other disasters of similar (or worse) magnitude.

Dolores Monet from East Coast, United States on February 25, 2012:

The story of the Titanic has haunted many of us for a long time. A testament to the hubris of men, it is an example of how vulnerable we are to nature.

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on February 22, 2012:

Thank you so much for reading and commenting, Bobbi - it's indeed hard to watch the movie when it depicts what may have happened (or likely happened) to those in the water. What a needless tragedy this disaster was.

Barbara Purvis Hunter from Florida on February 22, 2012:

Hi Marcy,

Marvelous hub, I saw the lastest movie about it. And I enjoyed the love story part, but I could not watch the people in the water freezing.

Real disasters are very difficult to watch--I suppose that is why I love fiction.

Anyway, you did an excellent job of researching & remembering from the original movie.

Bobbi

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on February 22, 2012:

Thank you, Tammy - my heart goes out to those who went through this. Even a century later, it tugs at our souls. I appreciate your comments!

Tammy from North Carolina on February 22, 2012:

Fascinating hub without all the Hollywood drama. You really did your research and told a wonderful history. I love the photos. I can't imagine dying that way. Really well done!

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on February 22, 2012:

You are right, alocsin - I thought about including a reference to the Costa Concordia, but I wanted to retain the focus on the people who went through the Titanic disaster. As with many - the Costa Concordia event brought the Titanic to my mind all over again. Thanks for reading and commenting!

Aurelio Locsin from Orange County, CA on February 22, 2012:

Quite relevant with the sinking of the Costa Concordia. I've read that the only reason there weren't more casualties on the Concordia was it happened close to land. If that had happened on the sea, like the Titanic, many more would have died. Voting this Up and Interesting.

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on February 22, 2012:

Jools - I read there will be some events there as the anniversary approaches. So many of those on board were from your wonderful country - I imagine there are people whose great-great grandparents or aunts & uncles died in the disaster. Thank you for reading and sharing the Brit perspective!

Jools Hogg from North-East UK on February 21, 2012:

Interesting hub. In the UK, we will soon be bombarded with Titanic reminiscence and memorial but there sheer scale of the tragedy still makes it very poignant even 100 years later.

It is also a very different UK in terms of our shipbuilding heritage with very few shipbuilding docks around our island now, amazing to think we were leading the world in that industry in 1912. Voted up.

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on February 21, 2012:

Thanks, Jackie! Are you talking about the newer one from 1997 or so, or the old movie? I'm guessing the new one? It's a long movie, IMO, and that can drag it out. It's beautifully, done, though. I sort of like the direct way the 1958 version treated the event, though.

Jackie Lynnley from the beautiful south on February 21, 2012:

You know I still have not seen that movie, just bits and pieces, it is so upsetting. I guess I think if I see enough bits and pieces I will be able to watch the whole thing. Great job you have done on it here.

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on February 21, 2012:

Hi, Millionaire Tips - wow, that's a coincidence! The Titanic has been on my mind for a while since I realized we were at the 100-year mark. If you ever get a chance to see the 1958 movie, you should see it; it's a classic. It's nothing like the later version - both are great, but different.

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on February 21, 2012:

Thank you, Lord - I appreciate that insight into James Cameron! I think many of us could write or create things about that disaster endlessly. I found myself having to stop writing before I went way over the length it needed to be.

Marcy Goodfleisch (author) from Planet Earth on February 21, 2012:

Thanks, Billybuc - what a wonderful compliment!

Shasta Matova from USA on February 21, 2012:

What a well told story of the Titanic. I was talking about my coworkers about the Titanic this morning, so it was surprising to see this hub about it this evening. I haven't seen the original film, but did watch Titanic several times (and own it), and saw the traveling exhibit.

Joseph De Cross from New York on February 21, 2012:

Completely in awe! James Cameron was in Love with the R.M.S. Titaninc for years. When they discovered the wreckage in 1985, Jimmy was directing Arnold Swartzeneger, and deep inside had thought of making a movie about it. The times were not ready for him and special effects were no more than duplicates from Star Wars. Now we can see with our own eyes, what was like to be going down... into history. Thanks for your effort in putting this hubt together.

LORD

Bill Holland from Olympia, WA on February 21, 2012:

You are really an excellent writer. Your work is always so organized, step following step, no deviations, all laid out in an orderly and easy-to-understand fashion. I enjoyed this hub a great deal and look forward to your next.