Updated date:

Master Teacher of African History-Prof. John Henrik Clarke: African's Survival From Antiquity To Beyond The 21st Century

Author:
What we do for ourselves depends on what we know of ourselves and what we accept about ourselves" (Timothy Callender) Echoing Clarke's Master Teaching Lessons and Lectures

What we do for ourselves depends on what we know of ourselves and what we accept about ourselves" (Timothy Callender) Echoing Clarke's Master Teaching Lessons and Lectures

The Master Teacher and His Lessons And Lectures

The "ERUDITE" Dr./Prof. John Henrik Clarke


Learning To Read And Write African History

What I have learned thus far about African history is that I am still trying to be half of what the Master Teachers were up to the point of writing this Hub. What I am saying is that, as a student and writer of African history, I am still a student of African history who is still learning how to read and write African history, originate and compose the history of African people as I have learnt from the Master Teachers, of which I will be trying to write about, also attempt to compose and rewrite South African African History. The Master Teachers all had one thing in common, they read and wrote a lot-in addition to that, they gave lectures and travelled all over the world lecturing and collecting, or as Prof. Clarke said he and Prof. Jackson would be "Hunting"" for books in old used book stores, libraries and so forth throughout the world.

Even in the lectures below, Prof. Clarke cites some books and writers and in a direct way by encouraging listeners the way he tells and asks the audience that he knows that they have not 'read' the books he is talking about-and confirms it by asking them the question and receives embarrassed giggles and inaudible sounds or nervous stifled laughs-but in the end encouraging them to try to get the books he was giving/telling them about. This is the real problem that he was faced with in as he states this in his lectures - the fact that most of them did not do the necessary and 'deep reading' in order for them or us to be able to deal with African History.

From the challenges issued by Dr. Clarke that Africans should write their own history and not expect that the former oppressor will write it for Africans-he exhorts his listeners to read and write their own story through history; I have tried to heed to their clarion call: writing and composing African history from an African-centered perspective. On the face of it, it sounds reasonable and a good idea. Doing it is another matter when one begins to listen to Clarke in his lectures and the references he doles out with such ease, that in the end it becomes very intimidating and a huge task. The proficiency, efficiency and intellectual vastness of his lectures, writing and speeches defy and dwarf any effort one was going to have in writing anything clear, compact and choc-full of information and data.

when one attempts to write about the Historian's lessons and lectures about African history, and formulate or write the history one has learnt from schools or from the Master teachers themselves-it becomes apparent what a huge task and undertaking it is. I will not use all the tapes that there are about his lectures; and there are still those lectures that he recorded whenever he lectured over the decades as a professor and African historian-which if ever transcribed, hold a wealth of information and more references. He had a very deep personal library of rare books, manuscripts and audio files along with video/films. A bit of mention about his greatness and the libraries that have been named after him, and the Web sites will be in order here to pay tribute to a man who read and encouraged African people to read and write.

History of the John Hendrik Clarke african Library

John Henrik Clarke
(1915-1998)


- In 1986, the Africana Library was named in honor of John Henrik Clarke, who was widely recognized as a pioneer in the field of Africana Studies. Dr. Clarke played an important role in the early history of Cornell University's Africana Studies & Research Center. He was a Distinguished Visiting Professor of African History at the Center in the 1970s. He also made an invaluable contribution to the establishment of its curricula.

- Dr. Clarke is the author of numerous articles that have appeared in leading scholarly journals. He also served as the author, contributor, or editor of 24 books. In 1968 along with the Black Caucus of the African Studies Association, Dr. Clarke founded the African Heritage Studies Association. In 1969 he was appointed as the founding chairman of the Black and Puerto Rican Studies Department at Hunter College in New York City.

- Dr. Clarke was most known and highly regarded for his lifelong devotion to studying and documenting the histories and contributions of African peoples in Africa and the Diaspora.

- Dr. Clarke is often quoted as stating that "History is not everything, but it is a starting point. History is a clock that people use to tell their political and cultural time of day. It is a compass they use to find themselves on the map of human geography. It tells them where they are, but more importantly, what they must be."

- The John Henrik Clarke Africana Library is a special library located within Cornell University's Africana Studies and Research Center. The library is one of nineteen units of the University Library system, and offers a full range of services. Its collection of volumes focuses on the social and political dimensions of the history and culture of peoples of African ancestry. It supports the curriculum of the Africana Studies and Research Center and sustained, independent study.

Included here are basic books, complete collections of works of important writers, and highly selective research materials that complement the collections housed in Cornell University's research libraries. The Africana Library's documentation collection contains valuable primary source materials, including copies of rare monographs, manuscripts, newspapers, and journal publications on microfilm and microfiche. Those resources focus on especially important material on the American civil rights and Black Power movements.


- The Africana Center was founded in 1969 following black student protests on the Cornell Campus. One notable event involved black students depositing hundreds of books at the undergraduate library circulation desk and denouncing them as irrelevant to their experiences. Historically, the faculty of the Africana Studies and Research Center has always had a strong commitment towards maintaining its own library. The Africana Center included a library when it was first established. Later, after its building was destroyed by arsonists (April 1, 1970), it garnered funds from the university and local community to replace materials lost from its library collection. Once it relocated to its present site the library was prominently established near the building's entrance.

- In the late 1970s there was heated debate on campus about relocating the Africana Center once more. Because it's location was some distance away from central campus (approximately 20 minutes walking time) and many of its courses were taught at the Center, some considered the Africana Studies program too segregated. A number of more central locations were proposed for relocation. In the end these were rejected because they entailed substantial reductions in space. Ultimately, the Center's fledgling library benefited from this consequence. A reduction in space would have affected collection size and overall growth.

- During 1984-85 the Africana Center and University Library reached an agreement to transfer the library administratively to the University Library. Faculty of the Africana Studies & Research Center named the library in honor of Dr. John Henrik Clarke during the summer of 1985. As a distinguished historian, Dr. Clarke was instrumental in establishing the Africana Center's curriculum in the 1970s and taught courses in black history at Cornell.

Several years later, in 1990, the Africana Center and University Library collaborated to raise $50,000 to renovate the library's space and enhance the overall level of service. The John Henrik Clarke Africana Library now occupies most of the lower level of the Africana Center's three-story building. A third of this space is shared with a graduate student lounge and a computer lab. All of the library's holdings are included in the University Library's online catalog, and the Africana Library itself houses several online catalog terminals, a circulation terminal, CD-ROM and various audio-visual equipment, and has access to numerous locally networked bibliographic databases.

Featured Web Sites About John Henrik Clarke:

The John Hendrik Clarke Virtual Museum
In Memory of John Hendrik Clarke (Hunter College) Schomburg Legacy Exhibition: John Hendrik Clarke Section
John Hendrik Clarke Bibliographies (Cornell University)
John Hendrik Clarke Resources(Runoko Rashidi)
Information on Film, John Hendrik Clarke: A Great & Mighty Walk

(Black Caucus of the ALA Newsletter, vol. XXIV, No. 5 (April, 1996), p. 11.)

I set out to compose an article on the suggestions he touches upon and repeatedly states that we need to read and write our own history. The confusion that is apparent today in South Africa, is because Africans either write their books with the collaboration of Whites, and do not yet produce that kind of historical reading that can be easily read by the population they are writing that history-without any collaboration of White people.

Whenever one listens to Clarke's lectures and lessons, he is always giving the listeners references as to what to read concerning what he is speaking about. He was simply a walking African History library. He always stressed and encouraged the listeners or students to read, and would give a bit about every book or writer or stories or characters/dates of the books he was recommending. I have given a bit about his libraries in memory of the fact that he himself was a walking library, bibliography and encyclopedia of African Historiography, History books and authors with themes that pertained to African history and made efforts at trying to make it much more understandable and easy to get, for those who were listening to his lessons or lectures, and even on his videos, he still does the same thing: give a reference(s) of books that should be consulted by the listener or students to further their own understanding of that part of history he might have been talking about during a lecture or lesson, especially in his YouTube videos, liberally yet extensively posted below for anyone interested to listen to and pick up whatever they want from Clarke.

The piece above about his libraries, are in part my way of acknowledging this aspect of Prof. Clarke: that of consistently and constantly giving names and books that can be consulted for further reading and understanding of the lectures he was giving. And, by the way, these were and rare and hard to find books, but could trace them if one "Hunted" seriously in any old used book stores, as advised by Clarke when he was talking about himself and Jackson, hanging out, discussing, and "Hunting" for books in old and used bookstores; libraries and the web too have most of the books he recommended. This Hub is in part honoring a great African History scholar, and my own paltry efforts in writing and showing the relevance of his lectures to the African history of South Africa, by attempting to compose and rewrite African South African history from an African Centered Perspective.

Dr. John Henrik Clarke - The Psnl. Hst. Of Prof. J.H.Clarke (Like It Is)

Dr. John Hendrik Clarke - African World Revolution: Africans At The Crossroads

A Historical Bird's Eye-view On The Master Teacher

See And View the 13 Master Teachers" videos Conducted By Gil Noble on "Like It Is" TV Show[at the end of the Hub]

When and Old Griot or Historian Passes On-It's Like a library Burned

Studying and learning from Clarke is very important and rewarding and edifying. One's consciousness is aroused and gaining knowledge becomes a weapon which he so selflessly gives of. Clarke also teaches one about "learning" and "understanding' history he has a way of cajoling his listeners to evaluate their own effort and reading into African History, and others he inspires to begin to write history by learning from him and his lectures and speeches on African Historiography.

The lectures that follow below are lengthy, so is the written material of the writing of Professor Clarke and mine included, was my 'experimental' efforts at composing and correcting African history in South Africa. But his lectures, in their length, touch on various themes of African Historiography as only a Master Teacher like Prof. Clarke could deliver.

Clarke does his speeches, lectures and writing in a way that anchors Africa History in the "respectful commentary of World History", as he would point out over and over again, to drive the point home. What he also does so well either writing, delivering a lecture or making a speech, he doles-out reference for further reading on the subjects he would be talking about to his audience, author, date and all, and without skipping a beat, continue and elaborate on other interesting and new issues while treading on his main theme of the lesson or speech and lecture.

I will not attempt to explain all the videos of the lectures and speeches by prof. Clarke. I refer that the reader/viewer listen to them themselves, and all I will do is delineate and tabulate the writings of Prof. Clarke, and indulge in experimental historical writing akin to or closely following that of Clarke in his lectures throughout the writing of this Hub. The writing I will be attempting, will be culled from different historical time lines- say from the 11th century to 2013 and beyond.

Prof. Clarke left us a body of work that is extensive including the libraries in different institutions named after him. He also had his own personal library in his house which will be see in one of the video below where he is being interviewed in his house and he donated these on his passing. He was himself a walking library and bibliography and he dispensed liberally of these to his listeners and students. He always reminded his listeners or students to read more, and pay attention to the literature that is found all over the world, and that modern day African history students should collect and collate these into their reading, research and studying.

Now that he has passed on to the ancestors, it is up to us to take up on his challenge and begin to do what I have done in this article: begin to take baby steps in composing and rewriting the History of Africans in Africa and in the Diaspora. I will also be posting a lot of African History speeches and lecture by Prof. Clarke and hope that the readers and viewers of this Hub will get a thorough and better Understanding as to why we called Professor Clark and others, "Master Teachers". Throughout the Hub, I have posted videos of different lectures by Clarke, but lengthy for the readers/viewers to listen to some of the Master Teachers takes, who I will be creating Hubs for and presenting them and hawking their historical wares to all and sundry.

Dr. John Henrik Clarke - The Psnl. Hst. Of Prof. J.H.Clarke (Like It Is) Pt.2of2

Christopher Columbus and the Afrikan Holocaust: Slavery and the Rise of European Capitalism Paperback by John Henrik Clarke

The Slave Trade, Cultural Dependency and Cultural Terrorism

Just as Clarke, in the videos above throughout and below in the Hub gives the narrative of his life, he was also just as prolific with his delivery of the History of the Africans. As he said, he was looking for his people in the Bible, and could not understand why they were missing from the book of God. This then led him to search for the true history of Africans, that in the end, had learned since then that story of the Bible was stolen by Europeans from Africans in Africa. In his later scholarly years, he had reached a level of talking and lecturing and writing about Africa that can be seen throughout his tapes below which he characterized as if it was breathing to him. He then understood, postulated and formulated that we as Africans needed to control the image of God, as our own image. This ultimately led him to write:

"Early in the history of man there was no name for the human condition we refer to as slavery because no one had ever been relegated to that condition. The circumstances that would create the condition did not exist and the idea had never influenced a single mind. The enslavement of one people by another, in my opinion, grew out of fear, need and greed. In order to appease the conscience of the enslaver, a rationale had to be created - the enslaver had to convince himself and his victim that this new condition placed the victim and his family outside the realm of humanity.

"The general problem confronting African history is this: how to reorganize effectively, through meaningful research, all of the fragments of the past into a single ancient epoch, an origin which will establish African continuity; if the ancients were not victims of a mirage, it should be easy enough to draw upon another series of arguments and proofs for the union of history of Ethiopian and Egyptian societies with the rest of Africa. Thus combined, these histories would lead to a properly patterned past which it would be seen that (ancient) Ghana rose in the interior (West Africa) of the continent at the moment of Egyptian decline, just as the western European empires were born with the decline of Rome.

"Europe was emerging from the lethargy of the Middle Ages. It was regaining its confidence, manifesting a new from of nationalism and extending that nationalism into racism. The Africans had goods and services that the European needed, and the European had the basic technology that the African needed. Had the African needs and the European needs been considered on an equal basis, there could have been an honest exchange between African and European and the african could have gained from the technology needed and the European could still have had labor in large numbers without the Slave Trade and the massive destruction of humanity that went into the Slave Trade. This idea, only a dream in the minds of a few men, could have changed the world for the better had it been seriously considered.

That is why we need to rewrite and reconsider our narratives about African History. Diop writes: "The history of Africa will remain suspended in air and cannot be written until African Historians connect it with the history of Egypt [and I hasten to add, with the History of South africa-which has now been dated with civilization that existed 170,000 years ago-I will be embarking on this historical Hub as soon as time and opportunity presents itself]

Diop shows the interrelationship between African nations, North and South, and proves, [because in this case proof is needed again and again], that ancient Egypt was a distinct African nation and was not historically or culturally a part of Asia or Europe. Diop and other writers of African history called for a reconsideration of the role that African people have played in history and their impact on the development of early societies and institutions. Basil Davidson, makes the following statement of how, Africans being in Africa, was left out of the respectable commentary of world history:

"But isn't Egypt, other issues apart, quite simply a part of Africa? That, it seems, is a merely geographical irrelevance. The civilization of Pharaohnic Egypt, arising sometime around 3500 B.C. and continuing at least until the Roman dispositions, has been explained to us as evolving either in more or less total isolation from Africa or as a product of West Asian stimulus. On this deeply held view, the land of ancient Egypt appears to have detached itself from the delta of the Nile, some five and a half thousand years ago, and sailed off into the mediterranean on a course veering broadly towards the coasts of Syria. And there it apparently remained, floating somewhere in the seas of the Levant, until Arab conquerors hauled it back to where it had once belonged.

"Now what is one to make of this unlikely view of the case, coming as it has from venerable seats of learning? Does its strength derive from a long tradition of research and explanation? Is it what Europeans have always thought to be true? Have the records of ancient times been found to support it? As Martin Bernal has now ably shown in his "Black Athena", the remarkable book about which I am chiefly writing here, the answer to such questions is plainly and unequivocally in the negative.

"The ancient Egyptians were Black(African)-is a belief which has been denied in Europe since about 1830, not before. It is a denial, in short, that belongs to the rise of modern European imperialsim. I say, "new racism" because it followed and further expanded the older racism which spread around Europe after the Atlantic Slave Trade had reached its high point of "take off" in about 1630." This contributed to the miseducation of Africans in various ways.

Cultural Dependency And Cultural Terrorism


The cultural depenndnency of African people and many other ethnic groups is due to years of miseducation and the gradual loss of control of intergenerational cultural transmision. Most Africans are in deep debt.Culturally dependent people will believe, internalize and utilize anything that they are socialized to believe is correct. For this reason, Africans around the globe copy European standards of beauty. In certainAfrican countries, (Korea and some Asiatic countries), there is a crises in the number of people who bleach their skin in an effort to lighten it and look more European.

"Instead of growing food or practicing natural medical practices, that were passed on to us eons ago, we are totally dependent on others. It is ironic that those who make money on the medicine and other medical remedies today, studied and copied the practices of indigenous people around the world; the very people that they called backward. Now, instead of benefiting from the legacy of their ancestors, the descendants are dependent for medicine, food, and other things needed to survive.

"Africans have begun to internalize the views that exploiters have of us and our traditions. Many of us have become eager seekers to be educated in alien traditions, without criticism of them. For the past few centuries, the mass education that we receive in Africa and the Diaspora is rooted largely in Western European education orientation and practice.

"This condition has led to financial and political dependence. We no longer create the things that we need to survive; not food, clothing, or shelter. Even those things that we do create such as our music are under the control of others who have turned these very creativities against us. Destructive images are carried back into African communities, where the messages of uplift should be found."

In short then, dependency and lack of national autonomy has made Africans slaves to other foreign people who hold autonomy and their own brand of independence(Imperialism,etc.) over Africans. It is attempting to unshackle and free themselves fro such servitude that African writers and activists are needed to right the wrongs being perpetrated upon the billions of Africans globally. That is why I am writing about Master Teachers, and attempting to learn how to do what they are doing within and through the lectures, speeches, writing and references they so freely give of.

Dr. John Henrik Clarke Origin and Impact of Racism.

Race and Resistance: African-Americans in the Twenty-First Century (Race and Resistance, 3) [Paperback] Herb Boyd

Recovering The Lost Concept And Notion Of A "Nation"...

I am not capable to write about Prof. John Hendrik Clarke, per se, but I can attempt to discuss and write on what he wrote or lectured about and try to tie that to the history and struggle of South Africans Africans. It is his teachings I will and might be able to jot down and use them as a crutch in building the history of South Africa or use his lessons to enable Africans of South Africa to understand their position, role and direction in history, from his historical lectures and lessons, in order for them to begin to deal with their own historical enslavement and predicament in a much more clearer and informed manner.

Before I delve much deeper into the writings of Professor Clarke and his historical teachings, I would like to sample some of my thoughts and historical creations by experimenting with the pieces below. And when I write much more about the lessons and teachings of Prof. Clarke below, I will use the same synergy/South African historical data in attempting to anchor South African historical reality, also by piggy-backing on top of his research, lectures, writings and his lecture videos, to learn more from him and work on resuscitating the history, culture and critical consciousness of Africans in South Africa.

Attempts At Original Historical Composition Using Dr. Clarke's works as a Crutch in Re-Writing South African History

If we do a serious evaluation of African history, and because it is so broad, I will confine myself to South African African history, and how it has been shaped right up to the point it is today, it has been an amazing and revealing journey. It is a revealing journey now that we have a 20/20 vision and perspective as to what happened to African people all over the globe when colonization took creeped up on their sense of nationhood-because of the African Historiography now available.. And the teachings and speeches of Dr. Clarke and many/several other Master Teachers of African History.

This point was not lost to one Master Teacher, Prof. J.H. Clarke who astutely observed and prolifically wrote that:

"The major loss in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries was the concept of nation, the attaching of Africans onto other nations: some to England, some to France, some to Portugal, and then some to the worst of the elements to come out of Europe-the United States.

"Europe was getting rid of its human waster matter. It sent some to Australia; it sent some to the Pacific. And here we have to look again at what happened to the Africans in the Pacific. What happened to the Africans in Tasmania? The entire Island was destroyed. The British sent a lot of Irish prisoners, oppressed White people, to Tasmania, the Islands near Australia, where every man,woman and child was destroyed. The British knocked one year to five years off an Irish prisoner's sentence, depending on how many Tasmanians he killed. And bringing two matching ears to the British authorities to show that you had killed a Tasmanian, would mean one year to five years off of your sentence."

Therefore, according to Clarke, a people memories were wiped out in various ways. Criminals were exported from the British prisons and sent to the Islands in the middle of the ocean with the hope that they will not be able to survive and might die out there. There was also reports from other sources that these prisoners were shipped out to sea because there was the belief that the earth was flat, and that these prisoners put onto these ships, for the Islands, as we learned from Clarke, would come to the precipice or edge of the *flat earth*(Sot the Flat Earth proponents believed, and die off).

But, as Clarke pointed out, a provision was made in case they survived, and they were forced to be more criminal in their populating those Island and by killing-off the inhabitants, they were assured of some years shaved off their sentence.
A genocide of a people is one way of assuring that the memories they had about nationhood get wiped -off the face of the earth. Another way was conditioning Africans, amongst themselves, through the governing techniques of 'divide and conquer', the Africans were made to forget about what kind of people or nation as they were; instead, they have been reduced to fighting one another to earn the bread-crubs, favorability, and acceptance into the White world by abusing and and ill-treating their own people, Brothers and fellow Beings. Clarke reminds us thus:

"Here is something we do not understand today: "the nature of oppressed people preying on other oppressed people in order to resist oppression". When we use the the term "Third World," we better use it carefully. Because there are a whole lot of people in the "Third World" who, in order to ingratiate themselves to their oppressor, would gladly become an "honorary" oppressor where we are concerned." This surely applies to the present ANC-led and ruling cabal in South Africa.

With the advent of the Web and the proliferating social media, Africans in South Africa reading this post will become aware of what Clarke is saying, immediately, because they are now faced with a quislings and cabals draped in Black skins,who are peddling and pushing the former oppressor's agenda with such exuberance and gusto, that they end up being belligerent towards their own people who put them in power, and they end up(these elected leaders) in the service of Imperial and Corporate service and their deep fiscal pockets.

One need read most of the posts here on the FB, of which, the majority of them are decrying the fact that the present-day ANC government is nothing but a stooge of Big Capital and a lackey of Imperial governments doing their bidding, and they getting their 'commission' for their omission/neglect of human rights and oppression of their own people from the Capitalist wealth and being in the loop of the riches of the countries. The ANC reports the body-count to Pharmaceutical conglomerates; they report their body counts of malnourished polity and who ingest food poisoned by Monsanto; They get their uniforms and guns fin the SADF, through the American Military and Industrial Megalomaniac Complex. They are in cahoots with and in compliance with the whims and demands of the International corporations and Rich Western government- They are a pseudo-bootleg government that is not serving any material and basic needs of the African people who put them into power, in the first place.

They get their share of some sort of payback/kickback/political payola from DeBeers, Anglo American and other mining magnates for allowing them to scoop out the diamonds and gold of South Africa and Warehousing it in London and Swiss Banks-leaving our mines depleted and too deep and expensive to dig for more gold; the present-day ANC government has been parcelling land out for the highest bidders and getting their shares from the investors and these mighty Conglomerates and predatory Imperial Capitalist honchos.One can see and learn about this from the "Book: "The Confessions of the Economic Hit Man"

Because Africans are still smarting to the world as African people who have "Ubuntu", but the majority oppressed still have to wrap their heads around the fact that they are the losers in what is happening to their country and its minerals. Africans are willing accomplices, in admiring and trying to woo these government vultures, thieves and crooks at the expense of the future of their children and the poor, who are faced with the prospects of inheriting barren and depleted-of-minerals lands. Professor Clarke hit it spot-on when he writes:


"Yet with our goodness (our built-in hope), our beautiful humanity, our belief in justice for all people, we fall into their traps." Most of those non-Africans and those who consider themselves not Africans unless it is convenient for them to do so, "they watch to see you fight fight for something," Clarke adds, "and the minute you win they come in and ask for half of it, when they were never even in the fight. And many times they get it.. You give them some of your pie, and they want parity, which means half.

"Because we have not learned to practice, figuratively speaking, the essential selfishness of survival, we should give no piece of the pie until every member of our family has a piece of the pie. If you fight for a pie, then you fight for it for your family, and I wish you well. But I fought for this for my own kith and kin, and they take the priority in its distribution.

"If we are going to be free[the African world] and the whole world from Western domination, we have to envision ourselves as having the ability to do so, and we have to have some understanding of the world when it was under the domination of Europe. European domination has nothing to do with the European having a superior mind, or having ability that you do not have. It has to do with the fact that the European believed he could do it and gained enough confidence to do it.. We can do the same if we make up our minds to do it.

"Now, as a result of the European's rise to power, a revolution began in the world, one we must now revolt against. To revolt against it, we must understand how it began. How did we lose lose our Africanness? What will we have to do to regain it? How did we lose the concept of "Nationness and develop a concept of dependency?[Clarke Aswers and addresses these questions in most of the videos below].

"The most dangerous of all dependencies is to depend on your powerful oppressor to free you and share power with you, because powerful people never train powerless people to take their power away from them. So, we're dealing with a contradiction in terms.

"It is a contradiction to go into schools and to expect education; there is only a form of indoctrination.There are certain basic curricula that we can use to educate ourselves. Therefore, for us, most of our education must happen in the home, in the community and the church. You think the church is a less spiritual institution when it is engaging in education? It is not; it is a more spiritual institution. There are many ways of praying and there are many ways of serving whatever deity you happen to choose. What should concern us is how we got into this trap so that we can estimate how we're going to get out of it."(watch Clarke's lecture on "Christianity" below)

Whether African South Africans like what I am about to say or not, anyone is free to disagree. They have walked into a trap in their haste to acquire "freedom" and economic "parity" with Whites-not necessarily taking control of our land and economy.. They took their children to the White people's expensive and private schools. Their children lost their ability to speak their mother tongues, acknowledge their cultures, customs and traditions; these children look at their parents with indifference and as buffoons(parents and extended elder families and their peers) as backward, and uneducated about anything and lacking etiquette and knowledge of the finer things of life they see with their White peers and their parents.

In this way, they rebel and are abusive to all and sundry in their African milieu, to their own culture, history, traditions, customs, sacred rites and practices. This adds to the already marinating social dysfunction. And still, Africans seeing this disaster they have wrought with their children, they still do not change their ways, instead, they are still taking their children to the White schools to be educated into ignorance by their former and present master. This is further dealt with within the Hub, below.

Dr John Henrik Clarke Are We Ready For The 21 Century?

Reconstructing the Authoritarian State in Africa (Routledge Studies in African Politics and International Relations) [Hardcover] George Klay Kieh Jr. (Editor),

African History And Its Lessons About Nation-building

"We need to bridge these words with the meanings of our times" stated Obama."

African people need not only display our fluency in being able to cite intellectuals or coveted leaders only. Their words and actions ought to direct and give meaning to their understanding the action and the roles they need to play and work on. Their words(the martyrs) and the meanings of their daring actions need not only be something Africans should only regurgitate, but be blueprints and protocols for the emancipation of their people. Africans of South Africa have to know by now, since most are Web savvy, what the Web and surfing in the meta data of the viral stream what it is all about and how it should be used(as in the case of the social media). Social Media should be the vehicle through which Africans should bridge the gaps of divisions amongst themselves into a collaborative working forum that moves the stagnant struggles they are mired-in, forward.

People in the African communities are besieged by drugs of all sorts they have never had before the coming of the ANC(This will be discussed below in the Hub fully). They knew, then, that Sol Kezner was peddling coke, along with some other well-known soccer magnates and potentates; they also knew that there was something called the Mandrax,and sold through many illicit ways. Now there's a deluge of every drug conceivable circulating in the midst of all the poor African and rich ; children are splurged with violent games and pornography, and, most people save it in their cell phones; Rape is on the rise and rampage so do some other deadly crimes of "Africans on Africans"; the people who are suffering with HIV/AIDS, are left to wither away before they are given the Anti-Virals; chronic joblessness is creating all kinds devastation and despair not yet calibrated as to what does it all mean as it is ongoing as of the writing of this piece.

Africans of South Africa know that there is a culture that is practiced nationally by all the African groups that make the nation of Mzantsi. They have to first of all get rid of the hangover that has been the left-over from the Apartheid era. Africans are not "Tribes". By referring to themselves as such, they will be defeating the idea of seeing themselves as a free and united nation. African Consciousness means African awareness of the African's place in the world today, and the possibility as to where they could be tomorrow were they conscious. Knowing more about each other will help in the growth of a holistic understanding and appreciation of their own culture as a unified culture and one Nation.

So that, to be able to see themselves as a nation, they need to be cognizant and aware of their national make-up today as we speak. They have marriage customs and traditions; there are rules governing families and societies in their cultural protocols; there are specific laws and rules for labor and community services; Africans have a given expanse of African history, and within African history's curricula that can serve their needs as an African people, as touched-upon by Clarke above, and deep below in this Hub. Africans have a history of everything they might endeavor to take upon, without borrowing or aping other cultures, customs, traditions, languages, dance and music-the whole bit! This will be dealt with a little more down below in the hub

The day Africans in South Africa are able to link their present-here-and-now reality, to historical data and future planning, that will be the day the revolution of any kind will begin moving ahead. Understanding What the Media is and how to use it for one's gains is very important to come to grips with. Media, therefore, is just like oral communication, but using a gadget-a medium. I am not here talking about the TV, Radio or newspaper media, but technological media of the computer sort. Supporting one another and not being careless about their relationships with one another is of prime importance. The fulcrum of African South African culture is "UBuntu/Botho" along with "Inhlonipho/Hlompho"(Respect). This, if observed, can facilitate for cohesive and tight interpersonal relationships and interactions-and enable Africans of South Africa in building their history, culture and nation.

I am saying all the above because some of the 'have-plenties'(African Elite, in particular)have become so Westernized, that they have imbibed Western values, mores, moral and norms to the detriment of their own culture and people as I have described it above, because they boast and claim to know that "Shakespeare was a great writer and whatever; because Richard Elliot was the greatest poet; because eating out in restaurants has been imposed as a new African normal; McDonald's/now Burger King, KFC. et al, is the fastest way in and out for ones daily activities; that is, the Africans of South Africa, in larger numbers, are buying hook-and-sink into Westernized consumer patterns, fashion clothes that is parlayed as the sign of modernity(which Clarke addresses in this Hub).

The buying of expensive cars, housing, mannerisms, literature, music and mind-set, has become a way to show-off one's status in society, and sophistication about what others do not have, that one is the only one that has material wealth, and Western education; acquirement of Western individualism and fake accents and fake knowledge of a history, culture, tradition, custom and languages not of their own, is the way to go-the rule-something to be vied for and aspired towards attaining. Africans have and are living large in the shadows of other peoples ways of life, stories, and mannerism, culture, traditions except their own indigenous cultures, customs and traditions. They have discarded their own ways; and have also shown disdain and shame about and for their own culture, that in the end, instead of focusing on building a nation based on what their cultures offers, whereas, they 'pick up their noses' at it as if its unpalatable and has an odious odor, they label it derisively and dismissively in degrading terms and tones.

They brag about their jobs(which they do not own), cars, big houses in the suburbs(which they owe); sporting the finest clothes of Europe and America making them not local people-and that they believe makes them an important people; they wear expensive perfumes(French, Italian and American); they import and purchase house wares, dishes, shoes; go to these foreign countries and spend thousands of Rands on clothes and other trinkets and stay in five star hotels; they hobnob with VIP and Heads of States; they stay in suburban areas areas whose real estate prices could finance whole Townships with everything; they take planeloads of rich fun-lovers to remote Islands and rent-out a whole hotels and party for days. They are pigging away their paltry riches towards their own destruction-especially the monied African Elite and their hangers-on, relatives, friends and the whole nepotism, cronyism networked which has huge devastating and deleterious effects on the governance of the poor African masses and the poor themselves.

Nations are not build from such chaotic ways of being and forgetting communal existence in the African sense of living in that cultural manner.. Africans seem to fall into the trap that they are seeing big money for the first time, that this takes them out of our minds and wits as to what to do with it. There are many tales of waste and reckless spending that have become the lore of the rich African elite in South africa. Their children burn clothes and money to show-off the their vanity and ignorance along with boredom, plus lack of direction.

It would be better if African people knew what they were doing than wax political and rant revolutionary on Facebook and other Social media, and to no one in particular. All are pretentious acts that are an effort of a people running away from what is facing them: ignorance, mental illnesses; devastating illnesses like Cholera, TB, Scurvy, Alcoholism, Drug Addiction; rampant and callous corruption; insecurities; gloom and doom; bleak futures; joblessness; decaying communities and cultures, morals, mores, norms, customs, traditions,languages, discarding of sacred rites and practices which are fast disappearing permanently; miseducation and oppression, depression, repression. No Nation Will Ever Arise From A Disunited And Dysfunctional People!

Christianity before Christ Dr. John Henrik Clarke

Language Policy and Nation-Building in Post-Apartheid South Africa [Hardcover] Jon Orman

Nation-Building and Historical Cultural Refitting

This is what Professor Clarke has to say about all I have been talking about in the previous paragraphs:

"What I am trying to look into is how people maintain certain techniques that make them believe enough in themseles and become less dependent on other people in order to be whole again. And that the nature of oppression robs us of our wholeness, a lot of our confidnence, and, if we're going to have a cultural revolution, this cultural revolution must first be based on regaining our confidence in our ability to handle everything in a nation."

Prof. Clarke continues:
"That is why I have always disagreed with the current approach to South Africa, that we need to fight more than Apartheid. Apartheid is a real issue. Apartheid has caused misery to millions of people. We need to fight it all the way, but, while fighting it we need to prepare to take over that nation. A nation needs railroads. Who's going to build them? But if we buy steel from someone else, we've got to pay a high price. Who's going to develop an internal steel industry? Who's going to master the mines? Who's going to market what comes out of the mines? All of this is part of the restoration of self-confidence, and all of this involves a return to things that we've already done at a previous time in history.

"That is why, especially in [South africa] we are literally kept from our history. If you expect the present-day school system to give history to you, you are dreaming. This, we have to do ourselves. The Chinese didn't go out in the world and beg people to teach Chinese studies or let them them teach Chinese Studies. the Japanese didn't do that either. People don't beg other people to restore their history; they do it themselves. They learn something about freedom that we have to learn, that Freedom is something we must take with our own hands and secure it with our own hands. If other people's hands secure it for us, other people's hands can take it away from us." Our main ally and our most dependable ally in the fight for Africa, is us, and nobody is really addressing these facts, and yet when you read most of the posts on FB, you read people hollering for "Revolution and overthrowing the government", and yet, they are not even cognizant of the facts noted by Clarke above, or the goings on on the ground in their sectors.

In their thinking/talking about revolution and carrying out a revolution, Africans had better come to grips with what is a nation and how they are going to go about creating and building a viable and authentic and autonomous nation. Words should give meaning to our intentions and our intentions is to execute those meanings, words work as part of Afrcans' struggle and reality. As this piece is being written, it can be regarded and taken as a preface of the writing of African's own history and all that it requires from their own perspective and mindset.

They shall only succeed if they read what each is composing, not only copying from someone, and it al comes with original ideas that are relevant and relatable to their reality on the ground-from the Townships to the villages and suburbs, and might in the end be original in highlighting those pertinent and basic issues which resonate and are relevant to the people those seeking change for all those they are trying to mobilize and organize/uplift.

It is true, quotations, such as I have used from Clarke in this article should be used to edify one's points, perspective or point of view; also, those basic needs the people are decrying should should be etched onto their writing just as powerful in their rhetoric as those they would be citing. What they cite, should most of the time confirm what they are writing about, from the African perspective and concrete experience. What they are writing about and composing should be spot-on and relatable and relevant for the people to whom the writing is done on behalf of: the army of the poor and currently oppressedAfricans.

Just as in national-building, the material, ideas and ways and means that they will be utilizing should come from what the culture offers and has picked up on along the centuries-morphing and modifying itself from the new and the old-that, forming that cultural entity, which Africans can create and form a nation from, is one of the essential national building blogs. But it will take understanding the meaning of the reality, words and their relevance to their present-and how they articulate, elucidate, execute and manifest that which they know, have learnt and master from and about their cultures, customs, traditions,histories, music, dance, traditional dress, languages, sacred rites and practices within the make-up and formation of a nation as they see fit.... And with aesthetical erudition

If they can learn about learning from each other, respect their own ideas, thoughts and intentions, they might be able to grasp, fully and clearly, the notion and ways and possibilities of Nation building and unification... They need to better stop acting like they know it all, and accept that they have still so much much ground and learning to do about building a nation, let alone executing a revolution. Africans will never ever be Americans, nor Europeans or any other nation, but Africans of South Africa(Mzantsi). Maybe if African people start with that recognition, they might have their eyes, minds and hearts opened as to the importance of all that is theirs, originally and authentically and autonomously: .... a nation; maybe manage to start to build a nation in 2014-as the voting is around the corner, and they are only a nation when it is time for voting-after that, are discarded like snuff mucous. Africans in South Africa are far much better than this... This must be put to an end-the sooner, the better.

Dr. John Henrik Clarke - An Afrikan Revolution

Dr. John Hendrik Clarke - African People in World History (Black Classic Press Contemporary Lecture) [Paperback]

"Africa's Walk In The Sun" With John Hendrik Clarke

What Africa Is For Africans and The World

One of the most difficult things to do is to write anything about Prof. John Hendrik Clarke, the African Historian and Historiographer Master Teacher par excellence with few equals. I started the Hub with a piece I have written walking and following on the steps of Dr. Clarke to begin writing African history, and in this case, I used his citations to guide me through my piece. So that, here I will make a few notes about Clarke, and draw heavily from what he wrote about certain important aspects of African history and historiography, and will also utilize his lecture/videos[which must be viewed by the reader/viewer to get the total effect of what Clarke is about] for him to make his points, which he does better than what I could write about him.

The first video is his critique that evaluates and questions Africans commitment and readiness to really take up the struggle another notch. Dr. Ben, and Prof. Clarke were teaching about the African conditions and what they should do about it. His speech and lecture is followed by Dr. Ben both of whom were offering us a critical Dialogue and Comments about themselves and African History and its role in the lives and existence of African people. The Second Video is about the old themes of oppression and what Africans are to do about it. The third video is a tour de force of his past lectures and raising our consciousness about the effects and affects of all the inhumanity foisted upon the Africans, and the lessons to be learned from that.

One of the constant themes that runs the gamut of the body of work by Prof. Clarke is that he often repeated the fact that: "Civilization did not start in European countries, and the rest of the world did not wait in darkness for the Europeans to bring the light" Clarke says that in order for us to understand how this attitude came along, "one needs to look at the sate of what is called "World History. He says that that there is no single book in existence called "World History," that is an honest commentary on the history of the world and its people. Most of the history books in the last five hundred years have been written to glorify Europeans at the expense of other peoples. The history of Asia has been as shamefully distorted as the history of Africa."

Europeans in South Africa(British/Boer regimes) have consistently insisted that Africans have no history nor culture to speak of, and that which is called african culture, customs and traditions is nothing else but backwardness Barbaric and useless along with the African history, customs, traditions and customs. To debunk, and deconstruct this lie, we will look at what was the culture of Africans of South Africa in the 11th century, prior to the coming of Bartholomew Diaz, Vasco- da Gama and Jan Van Van Riebeeck, in 1490, 1492 and 1652 respectively.

The Ways Of Ubuntu From European Sailors

What Clarke is saying above is similar to the case of Africa and in particular, in the history of South Africa. Africans, they were and are still being told not only that were they civilized by the Dutch settlers, but they arrived into the country today known as South Africa when they(The Boers) 'trekked' from the north, at the same time the setters were landing in the Cape in 1652. Nothing could be farther from the truth. I have written about the the sailors of the shipwrecked Stavenisse off the coast of Natal, in another Hub, whose story is told by George McCall Theal as follows:

"In the records of the Cape Colony, there is a graphic account of the adventures of the crew of a Dutch vessel named the Stavenisse, which was wrecked at the entrance of the Bay of Natal if February, 1686. It was wrecked written for the use of the directors of the Netherlands' East India Company, and contains a good deal of interesting information concerning the country and its inhabitants. Near at hand , and English vessel had been lost a few months previously, and still another was driven ashore a few months later.

"All the wrecked seamen were received with kindness by the (Natives) Africans; they were supplied with food, and what property they could save was respected. By the unified efforts of the Dutch and English, assisted to some extend by the Africans[of [Mzantsi], a vessel fifty feet long was constructed, partly from the wreck of the the Stavenisse and partly from the timber found growing there. In this little craft, the captain, three oficers, and seven seamen of the Stavenisse, with nine English sailors, set sail for Cape Town, taking with them abundance of provisions and three tons of ivory obtained in exchange for some beads and copper saved from one of the the wrecks. They made the passage form Natal to Cape Town in Twelve days.

"An English vessel which had opportunely called before thy sailed, took some others away and they left at Natal forty-seven of the crew of the Stavenisse, one Frenchman, and four Englishmen. Upon their arrival in Table Bay, the Cape government purchased their tiny vessel, fitted her out, and dispatched her to make discoveries along the coast and rescue the remaining sea men.

"In the meantime, most of those unfortunate people had attempted to make their way overland to Cape Town. Some perished on the journey and, nearly twelve months after their departure, nineteen of them were picked up on the African coast of the Cape by the little vessel they had assisted to build in Natal. They had by this time been living two years among the African peoples, whom they described as friendly, hospitable, obliging, intelligent and ingenious, with laws and customs the same as those of the present-day African South Africans. Of the countries in which they had resided and through which they had travelled, they spoke in high terms of praise."

Another account about the Africans before the coming of the Dutch, or before they collided with the British/Boer belligerent culture, the Ship, Noord, arrived in Natal on the 4th of January, 1689, and entered the bay, there being at the time a considerable depth of water on the bar. In the evening of the same day the commander accompanied two of the sailors of the Stavenisse, who had gone on board, to their residence, where they had been living in plenty since the loss of their vessel, and were then in possession of several head of cattle. The commander was conducted to a neighboring kraal(village), where he was feasted on milk and fresh millet, and found the people civil and kind- ... During the nineteen days that the Noord remained in the Bay of Natal, the utmost harmony was maintained between the African people and Europeans."

"These seamen were not the only Europeans who had been kindly treated by the Africans of South Africa, for they found an aged Portuguese in the country, who had been wrecked on the coast forty years ago before, on his homeward voyage from India. The man had forgotten the language of his youth, and even his God; he had adopted the African customs, and had a wife and cattle in plenty"

What has the history of Africans in South Africa have to do with what I am writing about Prof. Clarke, one may ask. Well, One of the things that Clarke did was his encouragement to Africans to begin to read and write their history. In their writings, Wilson et al, Stavenisse is that "in 1688, survivors from the Stavenisse wreck on the Transkei coast and those who were shipwrecked around the 1500s described a population and a way of life of Xhosa-speaking people has been like that for many centuries, which demonstrated that the Xhosas who had been living there for some antiquated centuries/millennium before they came into contact with them in from the 1500s to the 1600s and beyond; that these were the ancestors of the present occupants of Xhosa People they met and those that presently lived there for eons to date.' (M. Wison and L. Thompson(eds)

The detailed accounts given by these survivors suggest that change in the way of life of the Xhosa-speaking people was very slow for very many centuries(Credo Mutwa gave the earliest account of this in his book "Indaba My Children," 1966). What the shipwrecked men described was not very different from the domestic life from antiquity to today, despite the fact that the people had by now lost their political independence and economic self-sufficiency.

One other point that I will like to make and revise is the fact that Around the 5th century A.D. there was iron smelting in the Transvaal(South Africa) and there was also the stock-keeping iron workers at Ntshekane, South of the Drakensberg Mountains in what is now Natal in the ninth century. There was also pottery found along the coast as far west as the Chalumna river indicate early iron-age settlement, typical of the Pondo and distinct from that at Ntshekane, and was dated back to around the eleventh century.

These historical factoids are conveniently left out by the Dutch Historians isthat the African people of South Africa were living in the places and regions they found them in, for eons before 1652, and that it is not true that the Africans came to South Africa around the time the Dutch landed in the Cape in 1652; also,they had fully function societies and families with culture, customs, traditions, languages, practices, rites that they adhered to throughout time form the remote antiquity(This will be briefly touched upon below).

So that, when Prof Clarke points out that for the past 500 years of African colonialism there has been no authentic book written as World history that makes an honest comment about the people of the world, I am simply filling up the gaps that are inherent and strewn throughout the literature which is hard to get, and bring them to the fore in order to point out to and and on behalf of African people of South Africa that their present history, culture, traditions, custom, practices, music, dances and language, have been in place, millennium before the coming of the Dutch, and the Dutch sailors, Portuguese and the British knew about the kindness, hospitality and Peaceful people the nation of Africans, and saw their cultures, custom, traditions as viable,and that the africans were civil and ingenuous, before the arrival of the warring and belligerent British/Boer coalition of the country that is called by the Africans of Mzantsi today, were like.

Learning from Clarke and using him as a crutch through-which we can present the histories of the people's of Africa, is one way I find to be helpful in originating and resuscitating the history of Africans in South Africa because what Clarke is saying, is the same thing that africans in South Africa know, and this is why I am highlighting, too, different points of concern about African South African history, and show, in the process, the relevance of Clarke's lecture and his lectures and lessons. That is why I regard him and dubbed him as a Master Teacher of African Historiography, Culture, Customs,Traditions, Sacred Rites, practices, languages and History.

Dr. John Henrik Clarke - Law And Order In African Societies Before .... Slavery

Afrikan-Centered Consciousness Versus the New World Order: Garveyism in the Age of Globalism (AWIS Lecture Series) Paperback

Africans Being Africans Again

The Denial Of African History and African Humanity

Writing about a Master Teacher, there must then be something about his mastery of the work that qualifies him to be so. In his soulful and oratory way, African history was for him something he could share with anyone, with the hope that it will make them become more aware and conscious persons. As I have indicated above in this Hub, I am going to write about Prof. Clarke's work, not his life, in order that I can begin to take my baby steps in helping re-create and rewrite African history(South african History in particular) from an African perspective whilst deferring heavily and extensively onto Prof. Clarke's work. What I have written above about African people of South Africa being very kind to the ship-wrecked sailors pre-Van Riebeeck in 1652 is to deconstruct and debunk the myth that has been expounded upon by the Apartheidizers and their disinformation machine, that South africa does not belong to Africans who came when they, the 1652 Settlers landed in the Cape, and that the Africans were simultaneously 'trekking' from the North of Africa into South africa..

The Video above is wherein Prof. Clark explores the fact as to whether we can be Africans again. He teaches us by making examples with the other nations that they(the Asiatics) did not copy any one's God, although they were all Buddhists. Their God looked like them or the local people. The starting point of this lesson begins with Clarke saying: "Most Western Historians have not been willing to admit that there is an African history to be written about, and that this history predates the emergence of Europe by thousands of years. It is not possible for the world to have waited in darkness for the Europeans to bring light because, for most of the early history of Man, the Europeans themselves were in Darkness(and somewhere he adds that 'no one ever knew they(Europeans) even existed').

If Africans believe this, they will not be able to write their History because most of the time they will learning and reading what the Europeans supposedly was bring to them as knowledge and light. And yet Clarke keeps on reminding us that our historical memory has all the things we need to be normal again. He said Africans have[had] a culture, a history, ways of governance, ways of living and existing with other people from anywhere in the world. What I have written above confirms what Clarke is saying. The very Dutch, some of who landed in the Cape, but those Dutch sailors of the wreck, stated clearly as how they had been kindly treated by the Africans, and they also observed that they had a strong culture, tradition and were ingenious and a fully functioning and legit society. They had a system that worked in harmony with nature, and the communities were based on consensus-but was now(as we see it today) demobilized(to some extent) by the Europeans-and Clarke insists that we should look at these customs, traditions, cultures, languages anew, and recreate them in the image of what is authentically left as African Culture of yesteryear, today.

So that, one of the things that Clarke points out that caused us to loose our being Africans was because:

"It is too often forgotten that, when the Europeans emerged and began to extend themselves into the broader world of Africa and Asia during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, they went on to colonize most of mankind. Later, they would colonize world scholarship, mainly the writing of history. History was then written or rewritten to show or imply that Europeans were the only creators of what could be called a 'civilization'. In order to accomplish this, the Europeans had to forget, or pretend to forget, all they previously knew about Africa."

The problem that we as African people are facing, according to Clarke is that we are enamored and taken up trying to be like our oppressors, believing them as they tout their lies about educating us, and we help boost their economies because we buy and sell everything that is theirs. We presently rush pell-mell into being accepted into their European milieu/society, to the point where we are willing to discard and shed-off the culture that bore, shaped and is still running in our blood. But despite all that, we awkwardly try to force our way into their(European) graces and acceptance, whilst we have a culture that is beckoning to us to be of it and use it as we see fit. Even to this day, this is still the conundrum that the Africans cannot resolve, as yet..

The other problem as an upcoming researcher, myself, is that I see Africans working assiduously to be European in language, manner of walk, gesticulating eating, dressing and having a good time[entertainment]. Now, writing the article above is because I am aware now, a bit, that at some time it is because Africans do not know what I am telling them as part of their African history and how it was like in the past for the different communities of Africans in South Africa.

Clarke advises: "A new approach to African history must begin with a new frame of reference. We will have to discard a number of words that have been imposed on our history. There is a need to reject the term "black Africa" because it presupposes that there is a "white Africa" There is an urgent need to discard the "term(s) Negro Africa," ["Kaffirs," Tribe," "Black"], and all that it[they] imply[ies]. This word (Black) grew out of the European slavery and colonial systems and it fails to relate the people of African descent to geography, land, history, and culture. There is no "Negroland" nor "Black land". When one hears the word "France" or "French," it is easy to visualize the land, history, and culture of a people. The same thing is true of the words "English" or "Englishman." When one hears or reads the word(s) "Negro"[Kaffir, "Black", "Tribe,"] the only vision that comes to mind relates to a condition."

The history That I wrote about about the information the crew of the Stavenisse gave us about the customs, culture and tradition of the Zulu, the historian from whom I culled this information, Theal used the words like "Natives" "Kaffir"(Niggers), "Kaffirland", when refering to the Africans of South Africa. Also, he did what Biko once talked about, that, the White writers of African history justify everything the settlers did to the Africans, so much so, this clouds their wrongdoing, and elevates their "Adventurists" spirit, and even if they cheated the Kings of their land, they legitimizes that transaction with the knowledge that the King was thinking something about the deal, that was not related to the actual contract.

So, what I did when I was writing down the history of Africans as presented by the crew of the Stavenisse wreck, I omitted these demeaning word, to the extent that whenever I write about African people, and the person I am quoting, no matter how good their work is, whenever they use the term "Black", I substitute it with African or put "African" in brackets. I did this because of the lesson I am taking from Clarke as I have cited him above, wherein he states that these terms that have been used against Africans or to name Africans, they do not tell you about the people's land, history and culture. In a jingoistic semantic way, these terms obfuscate the humanity and realities of Africans and 'disappears them from decent and proper commentary about their history', culture, customs, traditions and practices in World History. And Clarke has already pointed out that if ever there's "World History", it is not an honest history of the People of the world because Clarke says that the "Europeans, not only colonized nations, but they colonized Information about the world."

As Theal states that the settlers did what they did because they saw it 'fit to do,' and Clarke points out that the Europeans did what they did to Africans because they developed the confidence that they could do it and did it." This means too, that as up and coming African historians, we should filter those terms that downplay Africans and their history, and write history as we see fit to write. In learning to write our historical Historiography and story of Africans, and taking the lessons from Clarke about our history, we are able to discern a much more revitalized and revamped history from where we can now begin to develop and write an authentic and clear history of African in Africa and elsewhere, particularly, in the case of this Hub, the concise history of Africans in South Africa. This will greatly help and improve Africans to be able to "Become Africans Again."

Dr. John Henrik Clarke - The Afrikan Mind Pt 1

Dr. John Henrik Clarke - The Afrikan Mind Pt 2

Dr. John Henrik Clarke - The Afrikan Mind Pt 3

Dr. John Henrik Clarke - The Afrikan Mind Pt 4

Dr John Henrik Clarke - The Afrikan Mind Pt 5

Dr John Henrik Clarke - The Afrikan Mind Pt 6

Dr. John Henrik Clarke - The Afrikan Mind Pt 7

Dr. John Henrik Clarke - The Afrikan Mind Pt 8

Dr. Amos Wilson - Falsification Of Afrkan History - Eurocentric History, Psychiatry and th the Plitics of White Supremacy (AWIS Lecture Series [Paperback]

Contemporary African Minds Are For African Authentic Autonomy- Freedom

African Minds Must Look At African History Anew In Relation To world History

ANC's Neo-Post-Proto Apartheid


The Apartheid regime worked the African mind deliberately, constantly and consistently to befuddle, bamboozle, stuppify and dumb-them-down for many years to come. This can be easily seen when one studies and notes what has been actually done toAfricans of South Africa in a systematic manner and way because all this was done over time, deliberately. Apartheid was preparing and conditioning Africans of South Africa that when the time came for them to take power(Africans), they should be confused, indecisive, divided according to 'tribes", regions, Township, schools, churches, Township segregated living amongst themselves; they broke them down according to languages, in the education, employment, in the religion, that is, in every aspect of their lives. This effectively seems to have a serious impact on the present-day Africans who still can't overcome those divide and conquer techniques and shenanigans affected on them by the Apartheid regime over its life-span-to date.

When their history is retold by White writers, demeaning and inhuman terms such as I have mentioned above are used to belittle and segregate Africans from themselves, Europeans and from the world. So that, the way Africans are functioning today, it is as a result of the divide and conquer strategies that the Europeans, and in particular, the Apartheid Masters (Boers/Afrikaners) designed it. They made sure that any semblance of unity should be crushed and obliterated by talking of the behalf of, and for Africans in all spheres and aspects of life. The minds of the Africans were streamlined to the extend that a dependency was established, intellectually, spiritually and militarily and otherwise.

The product is the present-day African collective that is not able of getting a handle nor able to wrap their minds around their decrepit and dehumanized existence. Thinking has been curbed long time ago; independent will has been discouraged and trampled-upon; free will is akin to that of 17th century slaves; self assertion was replaced with hat-doffing, eyes cast down, and obedience demanded from their responses and body language/and thinking. Complete brainwashing and mental enslavement was the goal and modus operandi of the Apartheid regime.

This Hub is about unshackling and deconstructing that behavior and critiquing the present-day forms of slavery gripping the Africans masses, that is touted as democratic freedom and liberated Africans, by the present ANC-led government. This is not just a statement to attack the ANC, but a statement of fact. The ANC leaders know about this as a matter of fact because they too, at one time before 1994, couched their rhetoric in the same way I have been talking above about the suffering of the Africans of South Africa. They understand very well what Apartheid did to African people in Mzantsi, with them as part of that oppressed African collective. But today, wielding power as slave drivers, they ignore and purposefully forgot about the liberation struggle of Africans from the oppression foisted upon them by the Apartheid regime and European financial and military potentate.

The ANC has chosen to use the strategy of ignoring and intimidating their critics, unless they find something to complain about-then they react to that criticism in various ways, which are akin to their Apartheid former Masters.. The callous, laisez faire and reckless abandon mindset with which they are pursuing money makes them a ruthless adversary, against their people, and that needs to be critiqued.

They operate on top of the 'left-overs' of the Apartheid way in many way than one. Their people, a majority of them, still live in the places created by apartheid, and are worse-off now that they are permanently unemployed, sick, drugged, poverty stricken, made-purposely-ignorant; victimized and shut down and dumbed-down; harassed and killed if they demonstrate; rampant corruption that is so chronic and devastating, still needs to be written and talked about; malfunctioning clinics and hospitals; in a word, ANC is practicing 'neo-post-proto Apartheid.'

The eight videos of Clarke posted above address such issues and then some. He does it in a Historically, informative and soulful way. So that, in order for us to begin to understand ourselves as Africans what that is all about-and what it is that happened to Africans who got separated from their past and customs-this Hub is a teachable moment and enabler for Africans to be able to wrap their heads around their centuries old miseries and overcome that. I cannot really repeat what Prof. Clarke said in the eight(8) videos above all at once or all of it, but I will pick up on the writings of Clarke on this issues as he informs us thus:

"In a recent speech on the "Significance of African History," the Caribbean-American writer Richard B. Moore has observed:

The significance of African history is shown, though not overtly, in the very effort to deny anything worthy of the name of history of Africa and the African peoples. This widespread, and well nigh successful endeavor, maintained through some five centuries, to erase African history from the general record, is a fact which of itself should be quite conclusive to thinking and open minds. For it is logical and apparent that no such undertaking would have been carried on, and at such length, in order to obscure and to bury what is actually of little or no significance.

"The Prime significance of African history becomes still more manifest when it is realized that this deliberate denial of African history arose out of the European expansion and invasion of Africa which began in the middle of the fifteenth century. The compulsion was thereby felt to attempt to justify such colonialist conquest, domination, enslavement, and plunder of African resources and their labor, along with their humanity. Hence, this brash denial of history and culture to Africa, and, indeed, even of human qualities and capacity for civilization to the indigenous peoples of Africa."

Clarke, after citing Moore adds:

"Mr.Moore is saying, in essence, that African history must be looked at anew and seen in its relationship to world history. First, the distortions must be admitted. The hard fact is that most of what we now call history is the only history of the second rise of Europe. The Europeans are not yet willing to acknowledge that the world did not wait in darkness for them to bring light. The history of Africa was already old when Europe was born."

This is true of the history of Africans in South Africa, that their history was already old when the Dutch, in the 11th century, from the the 1440 to the mid-1600s, landed in the Cape. For them to try and convince African people that they are not the original people of South Africa, but 'trekked' from the north of Africa, and arrived at the same time as the Setters landed on the Cape, I have already written above about how that is not true, and it is false on its face and in its ahistorical account and context.

It is very important that what Prof. Clarke has to say should be relevant and relatable to Africans in the Diaspora, in Africa and particularly in South Africa. My take is that Africans did not come from any North of Africa, but have always been inhabitants of South Africa-from the beginning of time. Just recently, some archeological history has come out that there are, in South Africa magnificent structure that are dated as far back as 170,000 B.C.. There are so many things that have been unearthed, that I am still constructing a Hub on this new history. Clarke says that we must write African History, that is part of the re-wrting of South African African history which I still have to do, and it is by now very close to the stage where I will just have to write it and publish. But for now, the mind-set of oppressed Africans of South Africa is slowly being unshackled by Hubs of this calibre, and the very powerful and pithy Video lectures of Prof. John Hendrik Clarke and a few other Master Master Teachers I have added to Clarke's lectures in this Hub, below..

Dr. John Henrik Clarke: BLACK Leadership is FAKE & INCOMPETENT

How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America: Problems in Race, Political Economy, and Society (South End Press Classics Series) [Paperback] Manning Marab

Pedagogy of the Oppressed, 30th Anniversary Edition [Paperback] Paulo Freire (Author), Myra Bergman Ramos (Translator), Donaldo Macedo (Introduction)

Each One Teach One; Each One Reach One

Education and Information In The Struggle Used For Power, Liberation And National Building

Master Teachers: Those Who Preserve African History

Writing this Hub for is education and very difficult one because I have to write about the Master Teacher of Master Teachers. I have posted some of his videos in different lectures. I have taken my education into my own hands as Clarke advices, and am using his lessons to upgrade and update the history of Africans of South Africa.. I have taken up the task of helping to educate Africans in Mzantsi(South Africa), and in the process I am carrying out my own education from a Master teacher-at-large par excellent.

So making the education work for me because is learning from those who are the preservers of African history, thus giving Africans a fighting chance to carry on the torch of enlightening African people. To be able to do so, will be to look much more deeper into this phenomenon of Europe denying Africans their history and humanity. Professor Clarke, along with Cheik Anta Diop, has always spearheaded the preservation and teaching of African history, and it is to him(Diop) we will defer to learn our lessons about this issue.

Cheik Anta Diop has this to say about the Nations of Black(Africans) and their Culture in 1955:

"In our time, it is customary to ask ourselves all kinds of questions; so we must ask if it was necessary to study the problems dealt with. Even a superficial examination of the cultural situation in Black(African) Africa justifies such an undertaking. Indeed, if one must believe Western works, it is useless to look in the interior of the African forest for a single civilization which, in the last analysis, might be the product of Blacks(Africans). The civilizations of Ethiopia and Egypt, they express testimony of the ancients notwithstanding, the civilizations of the Ife and Benin, of the Chad Basin, of Ghana, all those referred to as neo-Sudanese (Mali, Gao, etc.) those of Zimbabwe (Monomotapa), of the Congo on the Equator, etc. ... according to the coteries of Western scholars, were created by mythical Whites who then vanished as in a dream, leaving the Blacks(Africans) to perpetuate the forms, organizations,techniques, etc, which they had invented.(We read a bit of this by Basil Davidson above)

"The explanation of the origin of an African civilization is only logical and acceptable, serious, objective and scientific if one, by what distortion whatsoever, leads up to this mythical Whiteman. One does not bother to provide proof of his arrival or his settling in these parts. It can be readily understood how scholars could not help being led to the extreme from their reasoning, from their logical and dialectical deductions, to the notion of "Whites with Black Skins," a notion quite widespread in the circles of European specialists. Such modes of thought obviously cannot persist forever since they are completely lacking in any substantial foundation. They are explained only by the passion which consumes those who create them and shows through their appearances of objectivity and calm.

"But these "scientific" theories on the African past are highly consistent; they are utilitarian, pragmatic. Truth is what is good for something and, in this instance, good for colonialism: the aim is, under cover of the mantle of science,to make the Black(African) man believe that he has never been responsible for anything at all of worth, not even for what is to be found right in his own abandonment and renunciation of all national aspirations on the part of those who are wavering, and the reflexes of subordination are reinforced in those who have already been allienated. It is for this reason that there exist numerous theorizers in the service of colonialism, every one more clever than the other, whose ideas are spread abroad and taught on a popular scale as fast as they are worked out."

Clarke adds the following: "The use of cultural alienation as a weapon of domination is as old as the world itself; every time one people in the world have conquered another, they have used it. It is edifying to underline that it is the descendents of the Gauls against whom Caesar used that weapon, who today are employing it against us."

Then Clarke informs us that: "Many White students of African history are now willing to admit that, according to most of the evidence we now have available, mankind started in Africa. The same students are not also willing to admit that it is logical to assume that human cultures and what we refer to as civilization started in Africa." Professor Clarke goes on to cite Leo Hansberry's lecture on "Early African Civilizations" who goes on to say that:

"Between the years 1834 and 1908, there occurred a revolution in academic thinking about Africa's place in the outlines of world geography and world history. And in the past 150 years, European explorers and archeologists have found in the valleys of the Niger, Benwezi, Limpopo and the Nile Rivers, [Limpopo River] in the basin of Lake Chad and the Sahara, extensive remains of hundred of ruins which bear witness to the existence of former civilizations hundreds and thousands of years ago. This knowledge of the facts about the African past when combined with the known history of other continents reveal that these also are the stories of triumphs and failures of mankind and form many chapters in the history of the human race."

As I have mentioned above in the Hub that I am preparing to write a history of South Africa that began around 170,000 years ago. What Dr. Hansberry is talking about is true, If I am to make it relevant to the history of Africans in South Africa, I have to go into the greatest and deepest of antiquities to begin to reshape and reform, rewrite and re-compose this history from the sparse, but available material in order to counter the existing falsehoods that the History of the Africans in South Africa began at the time when the Dutch accidentally landed in the Cape in search of fresh food, because the salted food had exposed them to and were assailed by scurvy and diseases like Beriberi. The explanation below explains it much more better"

A life on the sea, whether fishing, whaling or sailing the tall ships, barks, brigs, etc., has never been an easy existence. The early sailors were plagued by diseases such as Scurvy and Beriberi, Typhus or ship fever from mouse and venereal diseases from contact in port with Maritime Magdalenes. You never hear dysentery mentioned, but I would suspect, after reading about the salty food they ate and the poor water they drank, that that was a problem as well. With time and insightful observations, knowledge on how to prevent some of these problems evolved, and sea captains wanting to maintain a healthy crew would employ such tactics. For instance, scrubbing the decks daily prevented diseases caused by rats and insects.

By putting historical facts into perspective helps to clarity those issue which are still confusing about a people's distorted history. So that, this unknown history combined with the dissemination of it and trying to make it known through the available technologies today, is in a way creating a permanent corrected history that will be used by the generations of the Web in the future. It is also teaching one of the Africans and making sure that one reaches all Africans with this important historical data as presented on this Hub.

I have also written a Hub which I titled: "South African Culture, Customs and Practices Writ Large: Re-Morphed Cultural Renaissance against Dysfunctional Existence," and its sequel, "History, Culture, Customs, Traditions and Practices Of The Africans of South Africa: Deconstructing Historical Amnesia." In these Hubs I was attempting my hand at writing about Culture, Traditions, languages and customs, languages, music.literature and practices of Africans in South africa.

In the first hub of the two mentioned above, I go to the extend of trying to establish and attach the historical fact that Mapungubwe is South Africa's premier civilization and covered the whole area from the Limpopo, to the western Cape, Eastern Cape, The "Old Transvaal, Natal and Mozambique(Maputo now). We can not only regurgitate what the Colonizers wrote about the History, culture, etc., of the African people of South Africa, we must also do what Biko and Clarke intone us to do, very well, write African history ourselves from an African perspective.

I dared write articles that were new in the literature of South Africa, so that they became a rewritten history using many sources, images, and exploring the culture as it had been from the 1800s to today, and in the process, try asserted that these cultures we one unified cultures which had a lot of variety and diversity to them, but were one and uniform African South African Cultures. This is an effort to try and disseminate historical truth and facts to a people who still will have to discover these types of works, and who are still going to have write their history from their own African-Centered Perspective. Hub like this one, will offer that enabling chance.

I am working to try try and bring these thousands of years old civilization like the one of South Africa into light, and though this is a very difficult task, it is doable because there is now ample African history scholarship and using Master Teachers as the crutch of recreating and rewriting this culture-this helps in rewriting, composing and reconstructing the History of africans from remote antiquity into decent commentary of World history. Even if most of us have been educated or miseducated in these White institutions of higher learning, it is up to us to begin to search for African past and its greatness, and make sure we give continuity to it. By walking, as long as we able to, in the historical shoes and steps of the Maser teacher, using their lectures and the videos I have posted above, whilst at the same time reconstructing and recomposing Africans history, Africans in the 21st century, will be able to correct and write the true history of Africans in South African, Africa itself and the whole Diaspora,with the same intensity and information garnered from the Master Teachers and that which, as the students learned, adds to this historiography. By doing this, one is able to help educe a lot of Africans about African history, its importance and empowerment.

Dr. John Henrik Clarke On Cheikh Anta Diop

How And Why Europe Underdeveloped Africa

"What Should Be Done To Uplift and Develop African History

"European domination has noting to do with the European having a superior mind, of having ability that you do not have. It has to do with the fact that the European believed he could do it and gained enough confidence to do it.. We can do the same if we make up our minds to do it. That is why, especially in [South Africa] we are literally kept from our history. If you expect the present-day school system to give history to you, you are dreaming. This, we have to do ourselves. The Chinese didn't go out in the world and beg people to teach Chinese studies or let them them teach Chinese Studies. the Japanese didn't do that either. People don't beg other people to restore their history; they do it themselves. They learn something about freedom that we to learn. Freedom is something we must take with our own hands and secure it with our own hands. If other people's hands secure it for us, other people's hands can take it away from us. Our main ally and our most dependable ally in the fight for freedom is ourselves."

It is true, quotations, such as I have used from Clarke in this article should be used to edify one's points on writing African history; also, those basic needs the people are decrying should be etched onto our writing just as powerful in their rhetoric as those we would be citing. What we cite, should most of the time confirm what we are writing about. What we are writing about and composing should be spot-on and relatable and educing to the African polity we are writing for and to. Our writing of African history should be done so within the African perspective. W.E.B Du Bois decries the fact that:

"There are those who would write world history and leave out this most marvelous of continents. Particularly today, most men assume that Africa lies far afield from the center of our burning social problems and especially from our present problem of world war.Yet in a very real sense, Africa is a prime cause of this terrible overturning of civilization. ... In Africa are the hidden roots, not simply of war today but of the menace of war tomorrow.

"Always Africa is giving us something new or some metempsychosis of a world-old thing. On its Black bosom arose one of the earliest, if not 'the', of self-protecting civilizations, and grew so mightily that it still furnishes superlatives to thinking and speaking men. Out of its darker and more remote forest vastness came, if we may credit many recent scientists, the first welding of iron, and we know that agriculture ad trade flourished there when Europe was still in wilderness. Nearly every human empire that has arisen in the world, material and spiritual, has found some of its greatest crisis on this continent of Africa, from Greece to Great Britain."

As Mommsen says, "it was through Africa the last flood of Germanic invasions spent itself within the hearing of the last gasp of the Byzantium, and it was again in Africa that Islam came to play its great role of conqueror and civilizer."

Obfuscation Of African Historiography

On the Clarke Historical Tilt

One of the many things I have learnt from Prof Clarke is that "you cannot understand world history without understanding the central role of African history." What one learns from Clarke is that like his teachers, his teachings were African-Centered, and gives you accurate analysis and descriptions of history, he provides prescription of what Africans have to do to bring into being a new day. He has consistently urged all the people he has come in contact with to seek the truth about human history by pursuing the path of enlightenment through knowledge, first of self and one's people and then others. He has constantly predicated that this path of wisdom would lead to improvement and a new day for Africans everywhere.

Clarke provides an overall analysis of a period of history that has been systematically falsified and hidden from the serious scrutiny of African scholars and researchers and other committed individuals. He points to concepts that are keys to unveiling that truth about African history and destroying "Big Lies" about White supremacy. He articulated most neglected periods of African history, like those dealing with slavery and its impact on Africa and the world, for one. Prof. Clarke challenged the traditional views of African civilization and its strengths and weaknesses before enslavement and colonialism periods. He challenges the Eurocentric view of Columbus as a "discoverer" and instructs us that Columbus set in motion the genocidal process and renewed western racism.

Development Of Underdevelopment

Walter Rodney wrote:

"The seeds of the European-American system of materialism were planted during this definitive period of history from 1482-1536 and were nurtured by the exploitation of new lands, labor and resources. The centerpiece of this exploitative system was the trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. This development of Europe and it colonization of the New World or Western Hemisphere goes hand-in-hand with the Underdevelopment of Africa and the indigenous people of the Americas."

"This process of African Underdevelopment was genocidal and made for the African Holocaust through the enslavement. History informs us that the development of economic and political forces laid foundation for a European-American nation state and nationalism," Clarke informs us. The American economy in its foundations was centered around intercontinental trade and capitalism. So that, when we look at the fifty year period from 1482-1536 A.D., the European world was able to synthesize various economic, political and cultural forces and laid the foundation or a global system of power, centered around materialism, capitalism, and Imperialism. At the heart of the new global system of European-American materialism was super exploitation of the indigenous people of the Western hemisphere and the enslavement of Africans-[as well as colonization and enslavement of Africans on the African continent]..

"More often than not, the term ‘development’ is used in an exclusive economic sense – the justification being that the type of economy is itself an index of other social features. What then is economic development? A society develops economically as its members increase jointly their capacity for dealing with the environment. This capacity for dealing with the environment is dependent on the extent to which they understand the laws of nature (science), on the extent to which they put that understanding into practice by devising tools (technology), and on the manner in which work is organized. Taking a long-term view, it can be said that there has been constant economic development within human society since the origins of man, because man has multiplied enormously his capacity to win a living from nature. The magnitude of man’s achievement is best understood by reflecting on the early history of human society and noting firstly, the progress from crude stone tools to the use of metals; secondly, the changeover from hunting and gathering wild fruit to the domestication of animals and the growing of food crops; and thirdly, the improvement in the character of work from being an individualistic activity towards an activity which assumes a social character through the participation of many.

"Having discussed ‘development’, it makes it easier to comprehend the concept of underdevelopment. Obviously, underdevelopment is not absence of development, because every people have developed in one way or another and to a greater or lesser extent. Underdevelopment makes sense only as a means of comparing levels of development. It is very much tied to the fact that human social development has been uneven and from a strictly economic view-point some human groups have advanced further by producing more and becoming more wealthy.


"The moment that one group appears to be wealthier than others, some enquiry is bound to take place as to the reason for the difference. After Britain had begun to move ahead of the rest of Europe in the 18th century, the famous British economist Adam Smith felt it necessary to look into the causes behind the ‘Wealth of Nations’. At the same time, many Russians were very concerned about the fact that their country was ‘backward’ in comparison with England, France and Germany in the 18th century and subsequently in the 19th century. Today, our main pre-occupation is with the differences in wealth between on the one hand Europe and North America and on the other hand Africa, Asia and Latin America. In comparison with the first, the second group can be said to be backward or underdeveloped. At all times, therefore, one of the ideas behind underdevelopment is a comparative one. It is possible to compare the economic conditions at two different periods for the same country and determine whether or not it had developed; and (more importantly) it is possible to compare the economies of any two countries or sets of countries at any given period in time.

"A second and even more indispensable component of modern underdevelopment is that it expresses a particular relationship of exploitation: namely, the exploitation of one country by another. All of the countries named as ‘underdeveloped’ in the world are exploited by others; and the underdevelopment with which the world is now pre- occupied is a product of capitalist, imperialist and colonialist exploitation. African and Asian societies were developing independently until they were taken over directly or indirectly by the capitalist powers. When that happened, exploitation increased and the export of surplus ensued, depriving the societies of the benefit of their natural resources and labour. That is an integral part of underdevelopment in the contemporary sense.

"In some quarters, it has often been thought wise to substitute the term ‘developing’ for ‘underdeveloped’. One of the reasons for so doing is to avoid any unpleasantness which may be attached to the second term, which might be interpreted as meaning underdeveloped mentally, physically, morally or in any other respect. Actually, if ‘underdevelopment’ were related to anything other than comparing economies, then the most underdeveloped country in the world would be the U.S.A, which practices external oppression on a massive scale, while internally there is a blend of exploitation, brutality, and psychiatric disorder. However, on the economic level, it is best to remain with the word ‘underdeveloped’ rather than ‘developing’, because the latter creates the impression that all the countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America are escaping from a state of economic backwardness relative to the industrial nations of the world, and that they are emancipating themselves from the relationship of exploitation. That is certainly not true, and many underdeveloped countries in Africa and elsewhere are becoming more underdeveloped in comparison with the world’s great powers, because their exploitation by the metropoles is being intensified in new ways."

The following table gives a clear picture of the gap between Africa and certain nations measured in per capita incomes. It is the gap that allows one group to be called ‘developed’ and another ‘underdeveloped’. (The information is obtained from United Nations statistical publications, and applies to the year 1968 unless otherwise stated.)

Countries Per Capita income in U.S. dollars.

- Canada 2,247;

- U.S.A.3,578;

- France (1967)1,738;

- United Kingdom (1967) 1,560;

- AFRICA as a whole (1965) 1,400;

- Congo 52;

- Ghana 198;

- Kenya 107;

- Malawi52 Morocco 185;

- South Africa 543;

- Tanzania 62;

- U.A.R. 156;

- Zambia 225

"The gap that can be seen from the above evidence is not only great, but it is also increasing. Many people have come to realize that the developed countries are growing richer quite rapidly, while underdeveloped countries for the most part show stagnancy or slow rates of growth. In each country, a figure can be calculated to represent the rate at which the economy grows. The growth rate is highest in Socialist countries, followed by the big capitalist countries, and with the colonies and ex-colonies trailing far behind. The proportion of international trade which is in the hands of the underdeveloped countries is declining. That proportion was roughly 30% in 1938 and went down to less than 20% in the 1960’s. This is an important indicator because trade is both a reflection of the quantity of goods produced and a way of obtaining goods not locally produced.

"Developed economies have certain characteristics which contrast with underdeveloped ones. The developed countries are all industrialized. That is to say, the greater part of their working population is engaged in industry rather than agriculture, and most of their wealth comes out of mines, factories, etc. They have a high output of labour per man in industry because of their advanced technology and skills. This is well known, but it is also striking that the developed countries have a much more advanced agriculture than the rest of the world. Their agriculture has already become an industry, and the agricultural part of the economy produces more although it is small. The countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America are called agricultural countries because they rely on agriculture and have little or no industry: but their agriculture is unscientific and the yields are far less than those of the developed countries.

"In several of the largest underdeveloped nations, there was stagnation and fall in agricultural output in and after 1966. In Africa, the output of food per person has been falling in recent years. Because the developed countries have a stronger industrial and agricultural economy than the rest of the world, they produce far more goods than the poor nations-in the category of necessities as well as luxuries. It is possible to draw up statistical tables showing the production of grain, milk, steel, electric power, paper, and a wide range of other goods; and showing at the same time how much of each commodity is made available to each citizen (on the average). Once again, the figures are highly favorable to a few privileged countries in the world.

"The amount of steel used in a country is an excellent indicator of the level of industrialization. At one extreme, one finds that the U.S.A. consumes 685 kg. of steel per person, Sweden 623 kg. and East Germany 437 kg. At the other extreme, one finds that Zambia consumes 10 kg., East Africa 8 kg. and Ethiopia 2 kg. When the same kind of calculation is made for sugar, a sample of the results shows Australia with 57 kg, and North America and the Soviet Union with 45 to 50 kg. on the average. Africa, however, consumes only 10 kg. of sugar per person per year, and this is better than Asia with 7 kg..

"An even more gloomy set of statistics relate to basic food requirements. Each individual needs a certain quantity of food per day, measured in calories. The desirable amount is 3,000 calories per day; but no African country comes anywhere near to that figure. Algerians consume on average only 1,370 calories per day, while Ivory Coast can consider itself very well off within an African context with 2,290 calories as the national average. Furthermore, one also has to judge the protein content of the food; and many parts of Africa suffer from ‘protein famine’ – which means that even when calories are available from starchy foods, little protein is to he found. Persons in developed capitalist and Socialist countries consume twice as much protein food as those in underdeveloped countries. Such differences help to make it clear which countries are ‘developed’ and which are ‘underdeveloped’.

"The extent to which basic goods and social services are available in a country can also be measured indirectly by looking at the life expectancy, the frequency of deaths among children, the amount of malnutrition, the occurrence of diseases which would be prevented by inoculation and public health services, and the proportion of illiterates. In all these respects, the comparison between the developed and underdeveloped countries shows huge and even frightening differences. For every 1,000 children who are born alive in Cameroon, 100 never live to see their first birthday, and out of every 1,000 African children born alive in rural Sierra Leone, 160 die before reaching one year. Yet the comparable figures for the U.K. and Holland are only 12 and 18, respectively. Besides many more African children die before they reach the age of five. Lack of doctors is a major drawback. In Italy, there is one doctor for every 580 Italians and in Czechoslovakia there is one doctor for every 510 citizens. In Niger, one doctor must do for 56,140 people; in Tunisia, one doctor for every 8,320 Tunisians; and in Chad one doctor for 73,460 persons.

"It takes a large number of skilled people to make an industrial economy function; while the countries of Africa have a woefully insufficient number of highly qualified personnel. The figures on doctors just given confirm this, and the same problem exists with engineers, technicians, agriculturalists and even administrators and lawyers in some places. Middle level skills in fields such as welding are also lacking. To make matters worse, there is at present a ‘brain drain’ from Africa, Asia and Latin America towards North America and Western Europe. This is to say, professionals, technicians, high-level administrators and skilled workers emigrate from their homes, and the small number of skilled people available to the underdeveloped world are further depleted by the lure of better pay and opportunities in the developed world. The lopsided nature of the present international economy is strikingly brought home by the fact that the underdeveloped countries have in turn to recruit foreign experts at fantastic cost."

I have cited Rodney as extensively as I have because I waned to give a picture and sense of what he meant by "Development of Underdevelopment". At the expense of those countries with natural material and human labor, the exploitation of both was improving on the development of the European countries, and in the process, the underdevelopment of the Countries of Africa and the the so-called Third world countries. This is another way of learning about the another process, embedded within colonization and present-day Imperialism which facilitates for the subjugation of Africa and robbing it of its natural wealth, and exploiting its labor power for the maximization of the Profits and development of Europe. This is not different from the the exploitation of slaves, who were firstly captured, and their labor power exploited without any compensation to the slaves.

Prof. Clarke's analysis provides us with a perspective that enables us to understand that slavery ad genocide were institutionalized and systematized into a global system of domination, destruction and death which not only control land, labor and resources, but colonized information. Clarke says all this was done in the name of White Supremacy, based upon the concept of "chosen people" and "Manifest Destiny", enabling and furthering cultural genocide and was empowered,thus, to maintain mental slavery, which persists to date.

This has assured a continuation of the enrichment of Europe and the perpetual enslavement and continual exploitation and underdevelopment of Africa, the African Diaspora and the so-called Third Word to be developed to the extent that they remain in perpetual servitude and enslavement, also depended to Europe for everything, without being free, and dependent on themselves and their natural resources and massive human labor force. Up to this day, Africa has still not recovered, and is still made depended on the Western Big Capitalist and their own people are suffering from all imaginable diseases, poverty, hunger, ignorance and oppression which comes in the From of Cultural Wars and Cultural Imperialism. At times we do blame Europe for the underdevelopment of Africa, but at the same time, we ought to blame Africa and it endemic corruption.

Corruption to Blame for Africa’s Underdevelopment

In 2011, Evans Wafula wrote:

"Africa’s long quest to achieve the Millennium Development Goals is far from realization and is doomed to fail if radical reforms are not enforced in urban managements in Africa. Kenya’s housing Minister; Mr. Soita Shitanda has warned.

"He expressed fear on the pace of urban development in Africa and has blamed it on endemic corruption in a continent ravaged by poverty and diseases despite huge resource potential.

“Although many African countries have viable national frameworks for urban management on the continent, corruption remains the major challenge in Africa and is the main cause for under development in Africa,” Mr. Soita Standa, added.

"After the UN Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Africa is still struggling to meet her development targets. An estimated 1.1 billion people remain without safe drinking water and about 2.6 billion have no access to adequate sanitation. Almost 1 billion people, most of them in developing countries, live in slums, with constrained sanitation. This is figure expected to double over the next 30 years.

"That was the dark picture painted at the World Water Day 2011 in Cape Town, South Africa. The international observance of World Water Day is an initiative that grew out of the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio de Janeiro to forge common standpoints on urban development and urbanization in order to promote access to water and sanitation.

"In Africa, the importance of this is the rapid rate at which African countries are becoming increasingly urban societies and monitor the implementation of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD), held in Johannesburg in 2002."

During the Cape Town conference delegates mostly from Africa also under took to reviewed the progress in provision of water, access to sanitation and human settlements, as envisaged at the 2005 African Minister’s Conference on Housing and Urban Development (AMCHUD) held in Durban, South Africa in 2005.

“Africa continues to stagnate in realization of her MDGs painting a stark picture on the face of increased challenges of urbanization”. Edna Molewa, Minister of Water and Environmental Affairs, South Africa said as she underscored the importance of dialogue on water and sanitation issues globally.

"Although the expectation of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) was to reduce by half the proportion of people without access to safe drinking water and sanitation by 2015, an estimated 300 million people in Africa are faced with lack of access to safe drinking water and 14 countries on the continent suffer from water scarcity. With domestic water use below 50 liters per person per day in over 55 countries (the minimum requirement set by the World Health Organization), 35 of this countries are in Africa. An estimated half of people living in African suffer from one of six main water-related diseases.

According to a 1990 report by the UN Development Program, the proportion of urban dwellers with access to safe drinking water in Sub-Saharan Africa only declined slightly from 86 per cent to 83 per cent in 2000.This slow trend was not expected to change much towards 2015 due to the complex nature of urban development in Africa.

"Delegates at the WWD 2011 also identified lack of money and technology as the major hindrances to solving Africa’s urbanization problems and called for increased investment for water supply and sanitation in Africa and to deal with lack of resource capacity.

"African governments were encouraged to involve the stake holders at the grassroots and encourage equal participation of the local communities in solving their own problems through participation in order to access the challenges of urbanization."

If one reads Wafula's article above, not much has changed, and he has not touched upon the points raised by Walter Rodney above about "Development" and Underdevelopment.". But in talking about the development of Urban Africa, water shortage, sanitation and poverty top the list. The replication of the same conditions that Walter Rodney addressed above are the mainstay of the backward economic, social and political manifestations in Africa(South Africa) that even the UN can only report on, and its paltry contributions which do not give or make a dent on the lives of Africans in the year 2011. Walter Rodney's assessment of the underdevelopment of Africa was around the year 1968. Wafula's reportage was in 2011. The same conditions that Rodney talks about are recurring problem in the 21st century Africa.

Africa's lack of everything for autonomy to modern technology, is touched-up upon by Wafula, and this is modern type of underdevelopment which retards African development and progress in the21st century. It is well know that Africa is falling behind the rest of the world in terms of economic wellbeing., and poverty is on the rise in Africa compared to those countries that were once referred to the so-called Third World. There are about three strands of thoughts that are contemporaneous with this topic that are summing up the Underdevelopment of Development of Africa in the 21st century if we might try to talk in much more solid and concrete terms:

The first is the disease view. According to this view, malaria and other infectious diseases have fatal as well as debilitating effects on the human population in Africa. It negatively influences productivity, savings, and investment and directly affects economic performance of the continent (Gallup and Sachs 2001; Bloom and Sachs 1998).1 According to Bloom and Sachs (1998), the high incidence of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa reduces the annual growth rate of the continent by 1.3% a year and eradication of malaria in the 1950s would have resulted into a doubling of per capita income from what exists today.

The second is the colonial institutions view. According to this view, the persistent effect of colonial institutions can explain the huge differences in income across all ex-colonies including Africa (Acemoglu et al. 2001, Rodrik et al. 2004, Bhattacharyya 2004).2 The story goes as follows. Europeans resorted to different style of colonization depending on the feasibility of settlement. In a tropical environment the settlers had to deal with the killer malaria and hence a high mortality rate. This prevented colonizers from settling in a tropical environment and they erected extractive institutions in these colonies. On the other hand, in temperate conditions European settlers felt more at home and decided to settle. In these colonies they erected institutions characterized by strong protection of private property and efficient enforcement of contracts. These institutions created by the colonizers have persisted over time and they continue to influence the economic performance of the colonies even long after independence. The settlement colonies with better institutions continue to perform well in the economic arena, whereas the non-settlement colonies with poor institutions continue to struggle.

Finally, a third group of explanation relates to the economic impact of Africa’s engagement in slave trade. According to this view, Africa’s engagement in the slave trade caused massive depopulation of the continent over two centuries. This resulted into an implosion of the continent’s production possibility frontier and an unambiguous reduction in welfare. The secular decline in welfare continued over more than two centuries plunging the continent into economic backwardness (Gemery and Hogendorn 1979; Inikori 1992; and Manning 1981).

Another theory within this group is proposed by Nunn (2004). He argues that Africa’s engagement in slave trade had a detrimental impact on the development of domestic institutions.

"The frequent slave raids and the culture of violence attached with it severely damaged the security of private property and weakened the judicial system creating a persistent state of lawlessness in the society. These weak institutions persisted over time and are continuing to affect contemporary development.These theories, even though plausible, do not tell us how much of the variation in income across the continent they can explain."

But if we re-read What Rodney has tabulated above about the state of Africa in 1968, and we read what the authors I have cited above have to say about African progress or non-progress, they would do well to go back and read Rodney and try to trace those issues and aspects of underdevelopment of development and whether their regressive tendencies have improved in tandem with the developing world-and the Answer remains a resounding 'No'.

As a historical piece, Rodney's work still resonates with the africans in Africa, and Africans in South Africa because their material conditions have never changed since their development was arrested by the Apartheid rulers in 1948, and has been exacerbated by the ANC-led government since 1994. One way of understanding South African African History, is to read and understand Walter Rodney's development of Underdevelopment of Africa by Europe, and the truth of the matter is that that type of underdeveloped development has never gotten any better, to date, and If the articles I have cited above mean nothing, the reader should bear in their minds that development Rodney addressed in 1968, has worsened in all the things he addressed as a form of underdevelopment of Africa.

Reconsidering a Classic: Walter Rodney's "How Europe Underdeveloped A

Falsification of African Consciousness, Honorable Dr. Amos N.

Toward the African Revolution (Fanon, Frantz) [Paperback]

They Came Before Columbus: The African Presence in Ancient America Paperback by Ivan Van Sertima

In Defense Of African History

We Are All Entitled To Our Opinions; But Facts Remain Facts


We have to breakdown our dependency on other people. I choose to follow Clarke's advice to work on creating, composing, rewriting, defending and developing Our Story(History). For those historical issues that I am not yet too familiar with as well versed as the Master Teacher(Clarke) and other others on any particular topic I am dealing with, I always will have to remember to defer to the African History Master Teacher, Prof. Clarke; it is important to remember that Facts about African History have been distorted and dislodged form the psyche and consciousness of Africa, and that we shall have to carry out his(Clarke's) directive that we need to rewrite our own History: Defend African History with African-centered historical-based evidence and be able to insert our opinions regarding the validity and importance of African history.

I use the Social media to test run some ideas and evaluate the responses before I create some, not all(a paltry few), Hubs. Facebook(FB) works well as this mechanisms of weighing what I am writing and the kind of feedback I get, and in the process, try and apply my bit of know-how of history, and insert the better elaborations of the African Master Teachers to create, invent, compose and rewrite African history in general, and South African African History, in particular.

At times I do editorialize, and in many cases I offer my opinions, but overall, I use "facts" which cannot be altered or twisted. I use the Master teacher's teachings on particular subjects and issues I might be working on to develop and broaden the sense and importance, relevance and power of knowing and understanding writing about and synergizing the Master Teachers' facts, my own historical knowledge, opinions and their relevance to the African history of Africans in South Africa-in defending, composing, rewriting and making commentary about it into the viral stream and on Hub pages.

Another thing is, the more Africans Understand the Media and use it to the Advantage of Africans, as in my case, and as a sounding board of ideas and dissemination of ideas, with constant and immediate feedback from the Facebook users, in order to rewrite and recreate African History and Historiography, is what should and will be in order here. As Africans, we have to begin to understand and know that the media is not entertainment only, but a power tool that is not working in our favor, as yet. I advocate through practical use of the social medium Facebook, that it can become a tool of self-empowerment of Africans with the means to enable them to reset themselves and their history-and also propagate the History of African people effectively and profusely in the social media-through the Internet.

This article is about Prof. Clarke and his writings and lectures. It is also about how we as his students adhere to the lessons he teaches and applying ourselves to and through his protocols. This Hub is also about how as an aspiring Historian, using the lessons of a Master Teacher, I take and make his lessons relate and to be relevant to the past and present history of Africans in South Africa. What follows below, is one of the pieces I have written to show how serious the attack of Africans and African History is, and interim, I defer to two revolutionary Master Teachers to edify and solidify the importance of the discourse below.

Also, it is important to know how to begin to deconstruct and demystify their(Europeans) assertions that whenever Africans talk about African history, they say Africans are merely 'apologizing' or crying 'victim' with a history that will not help them, but cause confusion, since they "have 2000 languages" and it will be like "herding cats" trying anything like to unite them, impossible. It is such spurious and nonsensical ideas that should not be allowed to go by, and by putting African South African history into perspective, we need to speak truth to the former colonizers, and the present ANC-led government in power at present, and the people we are defending: Africans of Mzantsi, Africa as a whole and the rest of the Africans in Africa and in the Diaspora.

African history is not necessarily dates and event(which are important) but the constant refining and deconstruction of all those who are its detractors, very efficiently. The Hub above and in its entirety is very important because it does not only talk about Clarke, his writings and and philosophies only, but also offers and has posted a number of his lectures to satisfy anyone's curiosity and need to know about the history of Africans in the World; also, my added feature, more specifically, is connected to the Clarke's teaching,along with South african African history, to show relatedness and relevance and importance of the African Historiography by Clarke as a whole, and as it relates and how it is connected to South African History, specifically..

I have been here on Facebook for some time and have posted some things, and some were good, others, maybe not. I do not expect to get "Likes" or comments, as I often never do, that much anyway. I know I unsettle many people with my directness and spin of facts or whatever; but also, I have a right to be amongst Africans people and say my 'two cents'. There are many views and other things that African people are engaged in throughout the Web(FB Specifically), and I am privy or party to some, too, jut as most of us here on all these Africans Walls are doing, reaching out and connecting with the not-so-famous non-celebs and famous celebs-and nobodies like me.

I have been keeping in-check the pulse and the direction of the posts about South african Africans, and their disgruntlement about the ANC. This has helped shape and give direction to the composing and development of African History, using all other scholars, but mainly Prof. Clarke's lectures(See the videos) and writings from his books, that the writing and recreating recreating of African South African history has been made possible and relevant.

I think that given what the Internet and Facebook in particular is about, that should be expected and cede the fact it is about everything. One other thing I have been patiently working on is all things about African History(As African People, Culture's, traditions, Customs, Practices, Music, Dances), [and still will talk about South African languages in due time-for this topic about languages, readers can read my Hub titled "History, Culture, Customs, Traditions and Practices Of The Africans of south Africa: Deconstructing Historical Amnesia"] but for now, I am going to be dealing with those detractors who are working hard to ensure their insidious role, impact and stating the unimportance of African History by falsifying, demeaning and belittling its relevance to african people of South Africa. I will work hard to deconstruct and demystify this breed and intellectual terrorist of African history.

From the factual history of Dr. Clarke, if one get time to listen to his videos, one will discern the truth that anyone, who does not know about all what he is talking about, how can they(the detractors) have anything to say about the History of Africans? This is a very long article, and wish those who read it in its entirety will find something from it. The lectures are very long, varied and involved. Because those who still maintain that Africans will go back to 'Mud and Dung' houses and such careless-like talk, are clearly against African history and a terrible attack on Africans in Africa and globally, and the sad thing is that they do not know much about African history

Now, These Africanist Walls on FB, are Walls wherein we try to bring about the Dignity and Importance of African people and their History, are also good sources of the temperature, views and other aspects of African voicing their frustrations, opinions, at times facts about their present decrepit conditions presently under the ANC. As all know by now, that African people of Mzantsi are-with all their contradictions and whatever, are using writing about Africans to discard off these contradictions and are constantly working hard to achieve ways and means of erasing these contradiction, it is not an easy thing to do, and needs time and patience to really succeed.

I am clear about my history and how many people labored to see towards its edification and upliftment. Anyone of us(Africans) have a human given right to write about African history as we see fit and just. Anyone who finds it in himself to easily castigate Africans and writing about and talking through their history negatively and falsely, is an impostor, quisling and a former Apartheid dupe, and I will add, an agent provocateur whose sole goal is to keep Africans ignorant and as as slaves, even now in the 21st century..

The Liberal Conundrum

If people are wondering what this article is about and what it is I am saying, I will defer to the ultra revolutionary and visionary Bantu Biko at length here regarding White Liberals and their planting themselves in the Africans' midst and pretending to be for and with their causes. This is what Bantu warned Africans of:

"The role of the White liberal in the Black(African) man's history is South Africa is a curious one. Very few Black(African) organizations were not under White direction. True, their image, the White liberals, always knew what was good for the Blacks(Africans) and told them so(As will be seen with Phillip below). The wonder of it all is that the Black(Africa People have believed in them for so long. It was only at the end of the 50s that Blacks(Africans)started demanding to be their own 'guardians.

"Nowhere is the arrogance of the liberal ideology demonstrated so well as in their insistence that the problems of the country can only be solved by a bilateral approach involving both Black(Africans) and Whites. this has, by and large, come to be taken in all seriousness as the 'modus operandi' in south Africa by all those who claim they would like a change in the 'status quo.' Hence, the multiracial political organizations, all of which insist on integration not only as an end goal but also as a means.

"The Integration they talk about is first of all artificial in that it is a response to conscious maneuver rather than to the dictates of the inner soul. In other words, the people forming the integrated complex have been extracted from various segregated societies with their in-built guilt complexes of superiority and inferiority and these continue to manifest themselves even in the "non-racial" set-up of the integrated complex. As a result, the integration so achieved is one-way course, with Whites doing all the talking and the Blacks(Listening).

"Let me hasten to say that I am not claiming that segregation is necessarily the natural order; however, given the facts of the situation where a group experiences privilege at the expense of others, then it becomes obvious that a hastily arranged integration cannot be the solution to the problem. It is rather like expecting a slave to work together with the slave-master's son to remove all the conditions leading to the former's enslavement.

"Secondly, this type of integration as a means is almost always unproductive. the participants waste lots of time in an internal sort of mudslinging designed to prove that "A" is more liberal that "B". In other words, the lack of common ground for solid identification is all the time manifested internal strifes inside the group.

"It will not sound anachronistic to anybody genuinely interested in real integration to learn that Blacks(African) are asserting themselves in a society where they are being treated as perpetual under-16s(teenagers). One does not need to plan for actively encouraging integration. Once the various groups within a given within a given community have asserted themselves to the point that mutual respect has to be shown then you have the ingredients for a true and meaningful integration.

"At the heart of true integration is the provision for each man, each group to rise and attain the envisioned self. Each group must be able to attain its style of existence without encroaching on or being thwarted by another. Out of this mutual respect for each other and complete freedom of self-determination there will obviously arise a genuine fusion of the life-styles[and history] of the various groups. This is true integration.

"From this it becomes clear that as long s Blacks(Africans) are suffering from inferiority complex - a result of 400+ years of deliberate oppression, denigration and derision - they will be useless as co-artitects of a normal society where man is nothing else by man for his own sake.

"Thus in adopting the line of a nonracial approach, the liberals are playing their old game. They are claiming "monopoly on intelligence and moral judgement" and setting the pattern and pace of or the realization of the Black(African) man's aspirations(As Philip has done as will be shown below). They want to remain in good books with both the White and Black(African) worlds. They want to shy away from all forms of "extremisms". Condemning "White supremacy"a as being just as Black as Black(African) Power.(in the case of Philip, attacking and assailing of Africans discussing of their history, as if were "apologizing for their race" and too much involved with their history" also, and crying too much and seeing themselves as "Victims"), which will be seen below.

"They vacillate between the two worlds, verbalizing all the complaints of the Blacks(African) beautifully while skillfully extracting what suits them from the exclusive pool of White privileges. But ask them for a moment to give a concrete meaningful program that they intend adopting, then you will see on whose side they really are.Their protests are directed at and appeal to White conscience, everything they do is directed at finally convincing the white electorate that the Black(African) man is also a man and that at some future date he should be given a place at the White man's table.

"There exists among men, because they are men, a solidarity through which each shares responsibility for every injustice and every wrong committed in the world, and especially for cries that are committed in his presence or of which he cannot be ignorant.

"The description of "metaphysical guilt" explains adequately that White racism "is only possible because Whites are indifferent to suffering and patient with cruelty" meted out to the Black(African) man. Instead of involving themselves in an all-out attempt to stamp out racism from their White society(which I told Philip to do, below); liberal waste a lot of time trying to prove to as many Blacks(Africans) as they can find that they are liberal.

"This arises out of the false belief that we are faced with a Black(African) Problem. There is no nothing the matter with Blacks(Africans) The problem is WHITE RACISM[made bold by Bantu himself] and it rests squarely on the laps of the White society(I told Philip that it is his people who need to apologize to the African people, in my discourse with him below).

"The sooner the liberals realize this the better for us Blacks(Africans) Their presence amongst us is irksome and of nuisance value. It removes the focus of attention from some essentials and shifts it to ill-defined philosophical concepts(Philip's genetics spoof), that are both irrelevant to the Black(African) man and merely a red-herring across the track. White liberals must leave Blacks(Africans) to take care of their own business, while they concern themselves with the real evil in our society - White Racism.

"Secondly, the Black(African)-white mixed circles are static circles with neither direction or program. The same questions are asked and the same naivete exhibited in answering them. The real concern of the group if to keep the group going rather than being useful. In this sort of set-up one sees a perfect example of what oppression has done to the Blacks(Africans). They have been made to feel inferior for so long that for them it is comforting to drink tea, wine or beer with Whites who seem to treat them as equals. This serves to boost up their own egos to the extent of making them feel slightly superior to those Blacks(Blacks) who do not get similar treatment from Whites."

This Hub will be expanding and defending African history in the video presented above, and the cited writing and those that are original about Africans history and deconstruction of the argument spewed and spawn by the detractors of Africans and their history.

These are the sort of Blacks(Africans) who are a danger to the [African] community." This is the role that is being played today i south Africa.These dangerous Africans who 'suck' up to their former Master and in the process impoverish their voting African polity-whilst running pell-mell into trying appease and impress their Masters, for what I call "Commission" for an overseer-job well done. They are the most dangerous class of quislings and wanna-be Capitalist vultures who mooch on the people's coffers and play the role of "good and trusted lackey' for their monied Handlers-Western corporations and governments.

Dr Amos Wilson - Destruction of African Civilization

A Dying Colonialism Paperback by Frantz Fanon

Dr. Cheikh Anta Diop: The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality Paperback

African Nationness and Nationhood

Recovering The Lost Concept And Notion Of A "Nation"...

If we do a serious evaluation of African history, and because it is so broad, I will confine myself to South African African history, and how it has been shaped right up to the point it is today, it has been an amazing and revealing journey. It is a revealing journey now that we have a 20/20 vision and perspective as to what happened to African people all over the globe when and how colonization took crouched up and creeped-up on their sense of nationhood-because of the African Historiography now available..

This point was not lost to one Master Teacher, Prof. J.H. Clarke who astutely observed and prolifically wrote that:

The major loss in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries was the concept of nation, the attaching of Africans onto other nations: some to England, some to France, some to Portugal, and then some to the worst of the element to come out of Europe-the United States.

"Europe was getting rid of its human waster matter. It sent some to Australia; it sent some to the Pacific. And here we have to look again at what happened to the Africans in the Pacific. What happened to the Africans in Tasmania? The entire Island was destroyed. The British sent a lot of Irish prisoners, oppressed White people, to Tasmania, the Islands near Australia, where every man,woman and child was destroyed. The British knocked one year to dive years off an Irish prisoner's sentence, depending on how many Tasmanians he killed. And bringing two matching ears to the British authorities to show that you had killed a Tasmanian, would mean one year to five years off of your sentence."

Therefore, according to Clarke, a people memories were wiped out in various ways. Criminals were exported from the British prisons and sent to the Islands in the middle of the ocean with the hope that they will not be able to survive and might die out there. There was also reports from other sources that these prisoners were shipped out to sea because there was the belief that the earth was flat, and that these prisoners put onto these ships, for the Islands, as we learned from Clarke, would come to the precipice or edge of the *flat earth*(Sot the Flat Earth proponents believed, and die off). But, as Clarke pointed out, a provision was made in case they survived, and they were forced to be be more criminal in their populating those Island and by killing-off the inhabitants, they were assured of some years shaved off their sentence.
A genocide of a people is one way of assuring that the memories they had about nationhood get wiped -off the face of the earth. Another way was conditioning Africans, amongst themselves, through the governing techniques of 'divide and conquer', the Africans were made to forget about what kind of people or nation as they were; instead, the have been reduced to fighting one another to earn the bread-crubs, favorability, and acceptance into the White world by abusing and and ill-treating their own people, brothers and fellow Beings. Clarke reminds us thus:

"Here is something we do not understand today: "the nature of oppressed people preying on other oppressed people in order to resist oppression". When we use the the tern "Third World," we better use it carefully. Because there are a whole lot of people in the "Third World" who, in order to ingratiate themselves to their oppressor, would gladly become an "honorary" oppressor where we are concerned."

With the advent of the Web and the proliferating social media, Africans in South Africa reading this post will become aware of what Clarke is saying, immediately, because they are now faced with a quislings and cabals draped in Black skins, but pushing the former oppressor's agenda with such exuberance and gusto, that they end up being belligerent towards their own people who put them in power, and they end up(these elected leaders) in the service of Imperial and Corporate service and deep fiscal pockets.

One need read most of the posts here on the FB, of which, the majority of them are decrying the fact that the present-day ANC government is nothing but a stooge of Big Capital and a lackey of Imperial governments doing their bidding, and they getting the 'commission' for their omission and oppression of their own people from the wealth and loop of the riches of the country. They report the body-count to Pharmaceutical conglomerates; they report their body malnourished and food poisoned body Count to Monsanto; They get their uniforms and guns from the SADF, through the American Military and Industrial Megalomaniac Complex.

They get their share of some sort of payback from DeBeers, Anglo and other mining magnates for allowing theme to scoop out the diamonds and gold of South Africa and Warehousing it in London and Swiss Banks-leaving our mines depleted and too deep and expensive to dig for more gold; the present-day ANC government has been parcelling land out for the highest bidders and getting their shares from the investors and these mighty Conglomerates and predatory Imperial Capitalist honchos.

Because Africans are still smarting to the world as African people who have "Ubuntu", the majority oppressed still have to wrap their heads around the fact that African people are the losers in what is happening to our country and its minerals. They are willing accomplices, in admiring and trying to woo these government vultures at the expense of the future of their children, who are faced with the prospects of inheriting barren and depleted-of-minerals lands. Professor Clarke hit it spot-on when he writes:

"Yet with our goodness (our built-in hope), our beautiful humanity, our belief in justice for all people, we fall into their traps." Most of those non-Africans and those who consider themselves not Africans unless it is convenient for them to do so, "they watch to see you fight fight for something," Clarke adds, "and the minute you win they come in and ask for half of it, when they were never even in the fight. And many ties they get it.. You give them half of your pie, and they want parity, which means half.

"Because we have not learned to practice, figuratively speaking, the essential selfishness of survival, we should give no piece of the pie until every member of our family has a piece of the pie.. If you fight for a pie, then you fight for it for your family, and I wish you well. But I fought for this for my own kith and kin, and they take the priority in its distribution.

"If we are going to be free[the African world] and the whole world from Western domination, we have to envision ourselves as having the ability to do so, we have to have some understanding of the world when it was under the domination of Europe. European domination has nothing to do with the European having a superior mind, of having ability that you do not have. It has to do with the fact that the European believed he could do it and gained enough confidence to do it.. We can do the same if we make up our minds to do it.

"Now, as a result of the European's rise to power, a revolution began in the world, one we must now revolt against. To revolt against it, we must understand how it began. How did we lose lose our Africanness? What will we have to do to regain it? How did we lose the concept of "Nationness and develop a concept of dependency?

The most dangerous of all dependencies is to depend on your powerful oppressor to free you and share power with you, because powerful people never train powerless people to take their power away from them. So, we're dealing with a contradiction in terms.

"It is a contradiction to go into schools and to expect education; there is only a form of indoctrination.There are certain basic curricula that Africans can use to educate ourselves. Therefore, for us, most of our education must happen in the home, in the community and the church. You think the church is a less spiritual institution when it is engaging in education? It is not; it is a more spiritual institution. There are many ways of praying and there are many ways of serving whatever deity you happen to choose. What should concern us is how we got into this trap so that we can estimate how we're going to get out of it."

Whether as African South Africans like what I am about to say or not, anyone is free to disagree. We have walked into a trap in our haste to acquire "freedom" and economic "parity" with Whites-not necessarily taking control of our land and economy.. Africans took their children to the White people's expensive and private schools.The Children of Africans children lost their ability to speak their mother tongues, acknowledge their cultures, customs and traditions; our children look at us with indifference and as buffoons(we the parents and extended elder families and their peers) as backward, and uneducated about anything and the finer things of life.

"We need to bridge these words with the meanings of our times" stated Obama.

African people need not only display their fluency in being able to cite intellectual or coveted leaders. Their words and action ought to direct and give meaning to our understanding the action and the roles we need to play. Their words and the meanings of their daring actions need not only be something we regurgitate, but be blueprints and protocols for the emancipation of the people. Africans have to know by now, since most of them are Web savvy what it is all about and how it should be used(as in the case of the social media). Social Media should be the vehicle through which African people bridge the gaps of divisions amongst ourselves into a collaborative working forum that moves the stagnant struggles they are mired-in forward.

People in the african communities are besieged by drugs of all sorts they have never had before the coming of the ANC. We knew, then, that Sol Kezner was peddling coke, and some other soccer magnates; we knew that there was something called the Mandrax,and sold through many illicit ways. Now they have a deluge of every drug conceivable circulating in their midst; African children are splurged with pornography and most people save it in their cell phones; Rape is on the rise so do other crimes of "Africans on Africans"; the people who are suffering with HIV/AIDS, are left to wither away before they are given the Anti-Virals; chronic joblessness is creating all kinds devastation and despair not yet calibrated as to what does it all mean as it is ongoing as of the writing of this piece.

Africans of South Africa now that there is a common culture that is practiced nationally by all the groups that make the nation of Mzantsi. We have to first of all get rid of the hangover that has been the left-ovr of Apartheid. Africans are not "Tribes". By referring to themselves as such, they are defeating the idea of seeing themselves as a nation. African Consciousness means African awareness of the African's place in the world today, and the possibility as to where they could be tomorrow were they conscious. Knowing more about each other will help in the growth of a holistic understanding and appreciation of their own common and united culture.

So that, to be able to see themselves as a nation, Africans need to be cognizant and aware of their national make-up today as we speak. In their African culture Africans have marriage customs and traditions; they have rules governing families and societies; there are specific laws and rules for labor and community services; given the expanse of African history, there is a curricula that can serve their needs as an African people, as touched-upon by Clarke above. Africans have a history of everything the endeavor to take upon, without borrowing or aping other cultures, customs, traditions, languages, dance and music-the whole bit!

The day Africans in South Africa are able to link their present-here-and-now reality, to historical data and future planning, that will be the day the revolution of any kind will begin moving ahead. Understanding What the Media is and how to use it for one's gains is very important to come to grips with. Media, therefore, is just like oral communication, but using a gadget. I am not here talking about the TV, Radio or newspaper media, but technological media of the computer sort. Supporting one another and not being careless about our relationships with one another is of prime importance. The fulcrum of our culture is "UBuntu/Botho" along with with "Inhlonipho/hlompho"(respect).

I am saying all the above because most africans have become so westernized, that they have imbibed Western values, mores, moral and norms to the detriment of our culture as I have described it above, because "Shakespeare was a great writer and whatever; because Richard Elliot was the greatest poet; because; eating out in restaurants has been imposed and touted as a new African normal; McDonald's is the fast way in and out for ones activities; buying hook-and-sink into Westernized consumer patterns, fashion clothes is the sign of modernity; cars, housing, mannerisms, literature, music and mind-set, has become a way to show-off one's status in society, and sophistication about what others do not have, that one is the only one that has; Western individualism and fake accents and fake knowledge of a history, culture, tradition, custom and languages not of one's own. Africans have and are living large in the shadows of other peoples ways of life, stories, and mannerism. The people of African descent have discarded their own ways; they have disdain and shame about their own culture, that in the end, instead of focusing on building a nation based on what our cultures offers, they 'pick up our noses' at it as if its unpalatable and has an odious odor, and label it derisively and dismissively.

Africans in south Africa brag about our jobs(which they do not own), cars, big houses in the suburbs; sporting the finest clothes of Europe and America; they also wear expensive perfumes(French, Italian and American); import and expert house ware, dishes, shoes; go to these foreign countries and spend thousands of Rands on clothes and other trinkets and stay if five star hotels; in the end, they hobnob with VIP and Heads of States; they stay in areas whose real estate could finance a whole Townships with everything; Some of them take planeloads of fun-lovers remote Islands and rent-out a whole hotel and party for days. In a word, they are piggin away into our own destruction-espaecially the monied African Elite

Nations are not build from such ways of being and existing. Africans seem to fall into the trap that we are seeing big money for the first time, that they are out of our minds and wits as to what to do with it. There are many tales of waste and reckless spending that have become the lore of the African elite; their rich and spoilt children burn clothes and money to show-off the their vanity and ignorance along with boredom, plus lack of direction. It would be better if they knew what they were doing than wax political and rant revolutionary. All what they are doing are pretentious acts that are an effort of a people running away from what is facing them: ignorance, mental illnesses; devastating illnesses like Cholera, TB, Scurvy, Alcoholism, Drug Addiction; rampant and callous corruption; insecurities; gloom and doom; bleak futures; joblessness; decaying communities and cultures, morals, mores, norms, customs, traditions,languages, discarding of sacred rites and practices which are fast disappearing permanently; miseducation and oppression, depression, repression. No Nation Will Ever Arise From A Disunited And Dysfunctional People!

This is what Professor Clarke as to say about all I have been talking about in the previous paragraphs:

"What I am trying to look into is how people maintain certain techniques that make them believe enough in themseles and become less dependnent on other people in order to be whole again. And that the nature of oppression robs us of our wholeness, a lot of our confidnence, and, if we're going to have a cultural revolution, this cultural revolution must first be based on regaining our confidence in our ability to handle everything in a nation."

Prof. Clarke continues:
"That is why I have always disagreed with the current approach to South africa; that we need to fight more than Apartheid. apartheid is a real issue. apartheid has caused misery to millions of people. We need to fight it all the way, but, while fighting it we need to prepare to take over that nation. A nation needs railroads. Who's going to build them? But if we buy steel from someone else, we've got to pay a high price. Who's going to develop an internal steel industry? Who's going to master the mines? Who's going to market what comes out of the mines? All of this is part of the restoration of self-confidence, and all of this involves a return to things that we've already done at a previous time in history.

"That is why, especially in [South africa], Africans are literally kept from our history. If you expect the present-day school system to give history to you, you are dreaming. This, we have to do ourselves. The Chinese didn't go out in the world and beg people to teach Chinese studies or let them them teach Chinese Studies. the Japanese didn't do that either. People don't beg other people to restore their history; they do it themselves. They learn something about freedom that Africans still need to learn. Freedom is something we must take with our own hands and secure it with our won hands. If other people's hands secure it for us, other people's hands can take it away from us. Our main ally and our most dependable ally in the fight for freedom is ourselves."

In thinking about revolution and carrying out a revolution, Africans had better come to grips as to what is a nation and how they are going to go about creating and building a viable and authentic nation. Words should give meaning to our intentions and our intentions is to execute those meanings, words and works as part of the Africans' struggle and reality. As this piece is being written, it can be regarded and taken as a preface of our writing Africa's own history and all that it requires that it be from an African perspective and mindset. Africans shall only succeed if they had time to read what each is composing, not only copying from someone, and if all can come with original ideas that are relevant and relatable history to the the reality on the ground-from the Townships to the villages and suburbs; Africans might in the end be original in highlighting those pertinent and basic issues which resonate and are relevant to the people one is trying to mobilize and organize in order to form a nation.

It is true, quotations, such as I have used from Clarke in this article should be used to edify one's points; also, those basic needs the people are decrying should be etched onto the writing just as powerful in their rhetoric as those we would be citing. What we cite, should most of the time confirm what we are writing about. What Africans are writing about and composing should be spot-on and relatable and relevant for the people to whom the writing is done on behalf of-and to whom they are trying to relay to as to what nation-buildingis about, and how to go about it.

Just as in national-building, the material,ideas and ways and means that we will be utilizing should come from what the culture offers and has picked up on along the centuries-morphing and modifying the new and the old-that, from that entity, african people in South africa can create a nation. But it will take understanding the meaning of the words and their relevance to to our present-and how they articulate, execute and manifest, compose that which they know, have learnt and master from and about their cultures, customs, traditions,histories, languages, sacred rites and practices within the make-up and formation of a nation as they see fit.

If African people can learn about learning from each each other, respect one another's ideas, thoughts and intentions, they might be able to grasp, fully and clearly, the notion and ways of Nation building and unification... African people need to better stop acting like they know it all, and yet they have still so much much ground and learning to do about building a nation, let alone executing a revolution african people of South Africa will never ever be Americans, nor Europeans or any other nation, but Africans of South Africa(Mzantsi). Maybe if they start with that recognition, they might have their eyes, minds and hearts opened as to the importance of all that is our, originally and authentically and autonomously and Nation.... maybe manage to start to build a nation. And now in 2013-as the voting is around the corner, and African people are only a nation when it is time for voting-after that we they discarded like snuff mucous.. African people of South africa are much far better than this...

Stolen Property Amos Wilson

The Wretched of the Earth Paperback by Frantz Fanon

Steve Biko: Black Consciousness in South Africa; Biko's Last Public Statement and Political Testament Paperback by Steven Biko

Disparaging and Dissing Africans History Under the Cloak of Africanism

Quislings In The House: A Teachable Moment

Now, what's my point of citing so heavily from Bantu Biko? The reason is what I am about to post below, a discussion I was having with Philip, who was challenging the article I posted I titled "Recovering The Lost concept And Notion Of A Nation", and this is mostly what this article is about. The discussion below will be posted init entirety, and I will conclude this article with some serious thoughts on African History. Philip is all what Biko has Addressed above, in the post I am about to put below. The reader will have to read the article I have mentioned above that I have written and then check out my back and forth with Philip below.

Philip:

What happened to the Africans in Tasmania? Dude you need to get your genetics right. The Aborigines and English are closer genetically than Zulus and Nigerians. All those carrying the M162 market left Africa together 60 000 years ago - otherwise a good piece.

I would add that one of the biggest problems obscuring a fair view of African History is the obsession with Christianity, a creed brought like a virus with colonialists less than 200 years ago.

Me:

We are all entitled to our own opinions, but facts remain facts. It is better to really be seriously and better informed about certain subjects, and African history is not your forte. Nonetheless, a bit of some added reading would help clear up the air...(I proceeded to give him a link titled "Some History They Don't Teach.. Tasmanian Genocide")

Philip:

On the contrary African history IS my forte. I love it. I will read your link - read the first chapter of my book - izwelethu

Me:

You have not responded to the post I made, and I checked your site.. well, is all I can say.. anyway.. your response to the article I posted to you I think requires your response.

Philip:

What the British did in Tazmania was a shocker. They did some pretty bad things here in Africa too. What I have in common with you is a modern desire to drive Africa up the high road. The danger is projecting the racist terminology of the colonialist period onto modern Africa. Sure we still have dictators held up by foreign intervention, but they are black dictators. I am particularly critical of my own race for their lack of support of the Africanist cause. Let us seek ways to convert them to our cause, not to drive them away. Now if you have read the first chapter of Gods ................." you will follow how Christian (aka colonialist) thinking clouds an accurate understanding of African history.

Me:

I am not enamored nor bamboozled by Christianity and its being brought about to Africans here in Mzantsi by the Colonists. Also, I think before you make other people read your book, you should read Biko on the issue of Christianity and African South Africans and what he has to say about it. One more thing, I am more interested and well attuned to the the fact that all these religions, Christianity, Judaism and Islam have their origins from Africa and Africans. I do not want to go into this now, because the article above was not about religion, but about nation-building. I can write you an article about Religion and how it was used as a rationale for the crimes committed against Africans.. But, the article above is about "Nationhood" and "Nation-building, and "Nation-awareness". So that, you can sell your book, which I do not object to, but the article above is about how Africans have forgotten what it was like when they had their own nations, and what happened that they should lose that, and how they can recover that. I do not know what race you are, but you would do good to go into your milieu and educate them about what you have written about in your book-with me, you are speaking to an African historian and all else. The article above is all about what I say it is. As for religion and Christianity, along with its compatriot, Colonization, I can write an article about that-but the one above is about Nationhood and nation-building... Savvy?

Philip:

Where do I find the information on Biko and his postion on Christianity? That would interest me greatly.

The issues of race really gets screwed by historians, usually twisted for the purpose of argument. Anyone reaching to the issue of race would do well to get a clear understanding of genetics. I bring up Christianity as a prerogative for sdiscussion, because it is impossible to have a rational dialogue on long term human history and race with people that believe the world is made in the Middle East and that we all came from Cane and Abel. I fear that your fantasy of an African beginning for Abrahamism, is wishful thinking at best. An African that clings to the colonial religions, cannot even begin to speak of Freediom, because they are still trapped in the biggest chains of all.

Me:

Evidently, you do not really have an inkling nor knowledge of African history African Historiography.. You really do not have proof that I am coming from an "Abrahamism" origins of African history, or what my views are of Christianity and Christendom... I also never parlayed my ways of knowing African History were that, " ... I believe that the World is made in Middle East, nor neither that we "came from Cane and Abel. You even speculate, wrongly, that "My Fantasy" and "wishful thinking". And finally, you stereotypically imagine that I belong to a group of "Africans that clings to colonial religions" and ignorantly group me with those converts to Christianity. All of which is erroneous and false. Apparently, your geneticists view, which has so many flaws, is untenable, unsustainable and will never hold up when we are specifically talking about African history and historiography. I can tell that you do not really know "African History" because you do not even know Biko and what he wrote. As I have said before, you are really a 'johnny-come-lately' into African history, and you need to go and read/study/meditate on African history and historiography, before you trumpet falsehoods and label people, without any facts, to be what you think they are-that's patronizing and ignorant at their worst-plain and simple. For most of the Africans here in Mzantsi, gone are those days when White people determined the national, historical, political and whatever discourse or ideas that were the permanent feature of Apartheidom. And by the way, we have not yet even begun to talk about African history of Mzantsi (Suid Africa)... No European religion has me entrapped in any way you might imagine, and I have and never was chained to the putrid morass and dehumanization of Apartheid, and I and most martyred cohorts, overthrew Apartheid; and you should give yourself time to read African history in South Africa, Africa and the Diaspora... You might learn something...

Philip:

I have been a member of the PAC for 23 years, so I have had a lot of discussions about African history. My father was also a history teacher. I don't like it going in circles. I also don't pull my punches. If you get in the ring with me, keep your hands up and expect an onslaught.

I agree with you that the story has always been told from a colonial perspective. (That's how they taught us in Apartheid) - that “we”, white people are a superior race. It may be hard for them to admit this, but over EVERY white person, African or not, squats the concept of superiority.

I can see that you are both enthusiastic and intellectual, but this discussion can go all over the place if we don't put down a framework. These issues are so subjective and views of history, especially in South Africa, become distorted usually by racial outlook. My two main disagreements with you are

i) We cannot both be right. One of us is wrong. Different views can be tolerated but not exonerated.

ii) You overplay the importance of history on todays destiny.

One of the biggest barriers we have in the PAC is an overemphasis on the past and the history of the struggle (We all oversell our own roles in the outcome). Africanists need a forward positive looking vision. Careful of painting ourselves as "victims". This is not a moment in history for Africa to cower. We cannot succumb to the age old tactic of divide an rule. This is the moment for us to rise as a world power. Unity is paramount..

Where is that Biko/Chistianity Link?

Can I post your article on Azania1.com - Many PAC members will find this interesting.

Me:

I debate my equals, the rest I teach!(a la Clarke) You can repost my articles anywhere you please, but make sure you credit me for my work. Again, just because I am writing on these PAC pages does not make me a PAC person. I do not "join" nor belong to any organization, and have never . I write on these Walls because they let me, not because I am a member of any, PAC, ANC or 'whatever!" I am a ghetto dweller with a mind of my own, and I rail against anyone who patronizes of tries to be "Boss", "Bass", "Ngangara" or whatever, of me. I do not play second fiddle to no man born of a Woman(a tinge of McBeth there), and I am what I think and know that I am. When it comes to history, Philip, I was born into into it, self-educated on it, and the ring is too small to contain me alone, let alone you in it. What I am saying is that, your disagreements with me leaves me non-plussed. Thus far, I have not touched on religion because if I want, I can talk about many things concerning "spirituality and religion". But, my article above was not about religion per se, but nation-building and my two cents as to "What's to Be Done(Lenin-esque, that one). Anyway, you will not want to tussle me, seriously, and as for the Biko Link, ask those Pan Africanists if they know what I am talking about. I was born in the Ghetto and was educated at home(a rarity in my times) The rest of what I know, is what I devoted my life to.

About the relevance of history, which you say I am "overplaying it in its importance", right there this tells me I am talking to a neophyte Lilliputian who's the one who can say what you said; and, in your second point of disagreement - semantics is another area of my expertise, and when I see one, as feeble as yours, I know that you are really having issues and problems, because, as I opened up in my response above, that for me, it is not about you being right or wrong, since I once told you "we can all have our opinions, but facts remain facts". As to being 'enthusiastic' and "intellectual", well, that's your patronizing assessment, but as for me, I know that when we talk about African History, I debunk and deconstruct those who belittle it and, so that, check yourself, now, and I think there is so much in the article above, and thus far, I have yet to see your full response to what I wrote above. The rest is frivolous and inconsequential, as it relates to the article above. You must not really know Africans, those who live in the Kasi( Township), and note then that there are still some here who are as sharp as they were in the sixties and seventies, today. What I think about Africanists, you might wanna know, well, I am in 'working' terms with them, and those who know me, know that I hasten to harshly critique them, in real life and here on FB and other sites. As to the vision of PAC, well, since they are an organization, I leave that to them to decide what they want to do, because I am not an "Official' member, as noted above. As for threats about what will happen to me when I get into the ring with you, you welcome to try your luck.. Any time is tea time with me. So, if you want to rumble, set those perimeters you suggest, and see if they'll hold and whether you'll be able to keep up.. Unity! My article above has something to say about that...

Philip;

Ma'Afrika - let me explain Africanism to you. It is like herding cats. Everyone has a different view. There are over 2000 languages in Africa, each with a different culture. What ever we have as a difference between us, if we are to build a nation out of this melee, we will have to find a common block size and we will need to start laying them in a line, otherwise we are back to your old days with the mud ans dung huts. If you can make that small step to the PAC comrade, I can promise you that you will never have to apoologise for your race again. In the PAC there is only one race - the human race. I can offer you a lifetime of service to Africa, and we will meet at the gates of Lagos. Try to feel the spirit iof Subukwe, it will reward you.

Me:

I think you are off-base in a terrible way, and you are stepping over our heads and yourself, and you should be speaking to your White folks. I do not need a White man in Jozi(Johannesburg) to tell me anything about myself; and PAC, if accepted your being White, is their problem, but I do not give a a problem if you are in the PAC or not. And I think you are biased, just because I talk to you, you should start assuming things and I am not a 'comrade' to Whites" and am not to Africans. So, I do not apologize to no one, let alone you, about African people. I have told you that you are ignorant, and now I have more proof that you are nothing but a White-wanna-be-African. you do not sound or talk like Africans, in fact, you are more so a White person the more we try to talk about African History.

Look, man, whenever we talk about African History, we are not apologizing to nobody, and it is our Business as Africans to do so as we wish and see it fit. You have no right to even try to talk about a history you do not understand, neither know nor have no idea what it is all about. So far, you have been a patronizing White man of the type who I disdain . You should go and teach White people your brand of Africanism, of which you are not one and will never be one. You reek of Europe, and think like a European, that is why you are still on this dialog. You have not even started talking about the article above, and you have the gall and nerve to come and teach about me about myself. You must be out of your mind. The last response I am responding to, shows how much White you are. You think you know Africans that you can come and talk anything you have been spewing on this Wall. If there are Africans who think you are worth anything, I think they too are nuts like yourself. I do not pay mind to what you think, for as far as I am concerned, your thoughts, and aspirations and ideas.

You Jozi (Johannesburg) Whites think you will father all Africans because you 'understand' Africans-you purport to know Africans more than they know themselvesselves-which is balderdash. "No! You don't"! You won't! and are not capable of being African, even if you can because your mind is that of Whites I dislike, detest, and ignoramuses, of which you fall in all categories. That is why you think we Africans will deteriorate to "Dung and Mud Huts"-how demeaning and debasing you sound.

Do not patronize me About being African, and I did not read about being African, I lived it, and am still living it, and now I have to deal with detractors like you-and by the way, I am an African who is proud of his history and will tell it any way I like, as long as I want, and you, with your brand of humanity, you should go teach your racist and ignorant White people about Africanism. I am not only encouraged by Prof., SIR! I met him and hung with him, and you know diddle about him, except what you read.

My experience as an African is not read from books, or some lousy historical claptrap, or some uninformed discussions. I am the total experience of African people, and attackers of african history like you need not try to even tell me about my history, and I wonder which PAC people have you as their member.. Its people like you who are an abomination to African people, and that is why Africans cannot move forward because of people like you, who come to tell Africans who when they speaking about African History they are 'apologizing'-also claiming being 'victims'. You really do not know How I detest your type of 'liberalism'(Of which Biko was spot on about it), which seeks to undermine African History, its importance, relevance and truth..

You should Go and talk to White people about your ideas. And if next time you come to this post about AFRICAN HISTORY and what it means to African people, again, ever! I will take you to task much more seriously than I have done thus far-Not You, sani... You see Boerman/Whiteman, you really do not know who are dealing with here. Do Not talk about African HIstory, or say that when Africans talk About their history, they are 'apologizing', you must be inebriated, and if you cannot answer or respond to the article above, and decide to talk about issues that do not relate to the article above. Who really put you into the PAC, by the Way? .. and you are one of those Whites who think less of Africans and their african history, and I wonder why you have joined these Africans in their organizations and Walls for.. if you keep on talking down to me about african history, then, what is your role in the betterment of African people and their partly destroyed story and history..

You should stop your jingoistic proselytizing jabberwocky, because you're "Undignifying" "AFRICAN DIGNITY" under the cloak of Africanism by trumpeting that when Africans talking African History, that Africans are apologizing and crying victim. What?! You need to profusely apologize for your Racist Race, and do not tell me that with your Africanism "I will stop apologizing for my race" This is preposterous. What's your role here on this Wall if you can come and tell African that their history ought to be forgotten and concentrate on your 'weak' theory of genetics and your brand of 'god'. You really do not know anything about Sobukwe and about the Kasi(Township) and Ghetto of Soweto... And they do not know you in the Townships... So, What are we talking about here and dealing with, if the person who claims to be White wants to teach africans "Africanism", while with the same mouth condemns africans and their history and talks in degrading terms of africans "with their 2000 languages being like herding cats, might go back to the 'dung' and mud' houses". This is insulting, belittling, demeaning, dumbing down of and very much against Africans and their history, without any doubt.

Dr Amos Wilson Blueprint For Black Power

The Mis-Education of the Negro

They Came Before Columbus: The African Presence in Ancient America Paperback by Ivan Van Sertima

Attack On African History; Defense Of African History



I had an encounter with this person on FB and this is how it went:

This post was put onto the "Concerned Africans" FB Wall by Evelyn Clarke:

detailed reports are posted daily about the Afrikaner/Boer genocide -
MONDAY, 6 AUGUST 2012
Afrikaners denied all survival-rights
While fund-raisers are held as far afield as Poland and The Netherlands to help the one-million destitute, often homeless Afrikaner families survive in their bleak little squatter camps, the South African government has made laws which deny all survival rights to Afrikaners: This small 3,5m strong minority in South Africa is denied food-aid, land-rights, most jobs and even denied public housing in their own historic suburbs.

15-million blacks receive survival benefits and food-aid – but Afrikaners are denied those rights:

There is a growing suspicion that the 3,5-million Afrikaners are being deliberately starved to death: for while poverty is rife amongst more than 40million South Africans, at least 15-million black South African residents do receive monthly survival benefits including food-aid for themselves and their children through the US-Aid programme which is administered by the ANC-regime. Black South Africans also are entitled to child-benefits, surviving-spouse pensions and even free school-fees. None of those benefits are granted to any Afrikaners who apply for them.

The destitute Afrikaners in the squatter camps have suffered chronic malnutrition for the past ten years. Many will not be able to survive much longer against this onslaught, also because they are also not allowed to work for a living. In a recent shocking incident in Kimberley, some 600 children at an Afrikaans-language primary school who already suffer from chronic malnutrition and rely on school meals for their survival, reportedly were collapsing and falling asleep at school because the ANC-regime had stopped their school meals without any advance warning. At this school, Afrikaans speaking children of Afrikaner- and Khoi-San extraction are all suffering the same fate.

This is the Report I wrote on it, and when I tried to post it it was not accepted by the post, maybe too long or ... Anyway, I have posted on the relevant Wall to begin to look at the froward line of discourse that permeates the Web; well, if it lands on Walls such as this, I for one will take issue with it and tackle it the best way I know of.. I have not really answered and or responded to it the way I would like, but nonetheless, I will do so should need be or arise...

Me:

Yes, it is true what you are talking about above. It is also true that there are Afrikaner people living in shacks, lining out for food being doled-out by a myriad organizations. Malnutrition has surely beset part of the 3.5 millions Afrikaners and this was the case, by the way, when the Afrikaner Nationalist Party took over power from the British, many Afrikaners were suffering the same fate that you so eloquently discuss above. The information you bring about is very important for the country as a whole, because, you talking about it gives those who read your post some information they might not have because of a gazillion reason too numerous to tabulate here. it is also interesting that you note the fact that the you show concern concerning the preservation and the survival of the Afrikaner people and bringing it up in this forum.

I think your point is well taken, and of course the ANC is to blame for all this fracas. I do not really buy your assertion that the Khoi too are part of the destructive billing that the ANC, and that of the indigenous multi-corporations and their International cohorts are in cahoots with the same vibe, you seem not to point out that smidgen. Well, Have you ever been to the Townships of South Africa where African live? Have you say, slept a night in their houses and shacks? How about if whether you have ever made friends with them, shared their pains and woes, or have an exchange visitation with the people of the outlying ghettoes from Downtown anywhere in South Africa, a week, daily, ; a year, yearly? Do you have a really deep understanding what the African people of South Africa have gone through and are going through here in South Africa? Are you aware what the 48 years of concrete Afrikaner rule has done, effected and affected the African people has been like? Do you really have an idea what segregation has done to Africans in South Africa since 1652? to the present day date of 2012 has done and wrought amongst the collective African people's of South Africa, and what this was happened to them then to today as you are writing your piece above?

The point is, what you are describing is about 18 years old? Imagine what you are describing above as atrocities against the Boers is spanning a period of 18 years is what the African peoples of South Africa have suffered for 360 years, and more intensely than anywhere else in the last 48 years of the now decrepit Apartheid rule which has morphed into what we can discuss at any time you are willing to. Now, my point is, it is well and good to raise the issue you have cited above, but you should not overlook not belittle the suffering of Africans in South Africa as if it is something you can cavalierly make reference, but stress the groups you choose to show as being affected. In fact, we can discuss the Khoi History at length if you have time to read were I to break it down.

I do not see the Khoi as separate from any other group of the Nguni/Bakone people of South Africa. What you are discussing about is not necessarily new to the Afrikaners, but Africans have lived with it, to date, in its most debased and worst form for the more than three centuries and a half, every micro-second of their breathing lives and existence; shouldn't you really be talking about the genocide that is taking place amongst African South Africa in real historical time and see what you would come out with? Before we jump the gun, lets's not conveniently forget the present day suffering of Africans and project and present it as if they are doing any better with the paltry government handouts you are mentioneing-and which they have never received during Apartheid, but were given freely to White and poor families by their Apartheid government..

That is somewhat disingenuous and purposefully myopic of you and all those who are jibing about suffering, genocide, hunger, chronic malnutrition , school meals, kids collapsing from hunger int the Afrikaner milieu. but overlooking what the intensity and harshness of apartheid has left Africans with a hangover of Apartheid Mental Disorders of all who never had psychiatrists help them deal with or what has been happening or has happened to them for the past 48, every second of that 48 year, with no pause nor respite to speak of...

I am mot even talking about the 360 past years. That the Khoi are suffering the same fate is not working and it is a bit of stretch, and as I have indicated, we can delve into it if we were to hold this discourse. As you are now within this forum, pay respect to the 'audience' you are prospecting, and you need to really read-up of African History in South Africa, Africa and the Diaspora, because when it come to that Historiography, Everything Is Everything, and one needs to be cognizant of the confluence and confluence of various myriad assemblages of all that is bad the country of South Africa present country. You are welcome to sit under the African Shade, but you will have to learn about those who will permit to rest your torso, along with them under the African Tree and Shade.

To you it might not be apparent that there are those of us who know what time it is. Remember, we do not say that the concerns of Africa people are lacking in realizing the "ubuntu" of others, but it is time that the Afrikaners, with due respect, begin to respect and treat African people with some humility and manner of beginning to know and "See" who they really are, according to the terms of African people. The present government might be drunk with the "Gravy Train" left-overs, but the African Masses, at their core, are not what you seem to know, and knowing them will bring you down to earth and your understanding of Africans will heighten your maybe knowing something of Africans, and why the Afrikaners are suffering, why the African people in South Africa are being wiped out(I will say being "Genocided") if this applies.

I am as passionate about Africans as you are of Afrikaners(who are not Africans, for those reading this response). You can tell your story however you want, but pay attention to the audience you are addressing and what they are all about. I thought I would give you this long 'praatjie'(talk) and maybe this will help and allow you to present your story, without being ignorant of the story of African peoples of South africa and, Africa and the Diaspora... Every one is entitled to their own opinions, but facts remain facts... Historical facts help us understand the present so that we can formulate our future. I think this is what Africans have been doing up to now, and you would do well were you to ask Africans about things you really do not know about them.. That is my two cents and hope this help put a few things into Perspective.

Then this Exchange occurred:

Evelyn Clarke:

Whatever my dear friend has given you the impression that I am on the Afrikaners side ??? I am merely bringing to all the brother & sisters attention, as to how the wheel has turned. God has said that we may not take delight on others suffering, so I will not take delight. However I am a victim of the Afrikaners cruelty. How we as Transkei Traders were driven out & our roots were snapped by these uncaring people, the Nationalist Government wanted to turn the Transkei into a homeland. For 40 years we have wandered around SA with no sense of belonging. I have suffered & suffered!!! I would like to tell you more, are you interested??
The article I posted, can clearly be seen as where it comes from. I've just re-posted it. I never wrote it at all!
By the way, - why does it look as though I've been taken off this site? What have I done wrong?

Me:

Well, Evelyn, there are three sides to any story, one is yours, the other is mine and the third one is the Truth. A holistic purview and review of the issues need to be in order here. To tell the Story of Afrikaners and their misery is a good thing, so is the story of Afrikaans a good thing for one to tell, as one sees fit. I would not hasten to harken to Religious spiritual matters as of yet because there too, I have my opinions and facts. In the instance above, I am talking about everything Social, psychological, psychohistorical, references will be made, were I to say my side too, to the Historiography of African history. If, as your article purports and assert and cites stats and incidences of Afrikaner suffering, I think that is a point well-taken, as I have stated above.

Yes, if you want to indulge me with your suffering, I willingly oblige and be prepared to learn more than from what I know or do not know about how other people suffered in South Africa who belong to different ethnic groups. I would emphasize the point that you tell African people what your story is... Africans are going to tell you too what their story is about and also is like at present. Your telling us about yourself will help in enhancing our understanding of the plight of those whites who suffered under Apartheid, and those who were fighting for the liberation of all righteous people. There are those who are White and have suffered from the coercion and limited choices as to what they should act like under Apartheid. Then there are those who are called "The silent Germans"who knew of the concentration camps and said nor did nothing, as was the case and is still the case in South Africa-when it comes to White people..

Finally there are the with "Verkrampte" views which are not prepared to listen to Africans, no matter what.. I do not invoke God in such discussion because I think there are facts spread-out through the internet and literature to satisfy one's curiosity and wish to learn or know more about that.. Your emphasis of the fact that you "have suffered and suffered!!! is well taken and understood because for Africans, our Second surname is "Suffered or Suffering"; we know very much all about it and are still going trough its pervasive, defective and destructive effects even as we speak to each other. I am simply saying, if you want us to know and learn about what you went through, and seeing that you do not know about Africans that and what it meant to them going through that type of social dysfunction and cultural miasma, it behooves you to listen to us too tell you about Africans and your learning more about us than what you might want to tell thems what it is you know about Africans-which should be unbiased and be true (which is acceptable, but incomplete).

I am talking as an African and apologizing to no one for what I say, I am not dismissing you not to tell Africans about you and your life, you should too, be willing to learn from them when they tell you about their plight, stresses, distresses, oppression, depression, repression, segregation, racism, abuse, torture, debasement, forcibly made to accept an inferior complex and status, constantly trying to prove oneself to one oppressor and the whole bit! Yes, I am willing to listen and learn about your and your 'struggle', and you should too learn and respond to African historical narrative and know and understand that too as the 'third rail'- "Truth!". I read and understood your post above and responded to it clearly and decisively. There is nothing that I did not understand in what you said. It is all on record so is my response. But if you want to tell Africans about your 'story', they too, will in kind to give you a heads-up about the historiography of African history as told by Africans-from their own African perspective-and this must be respected...

And also, I think you should have made that point quite clear by prefacing it with such comments and in the process making . us, your audience aware of that fact, and could have added a bit of a comment that would indicate that. I did not appreciate the fact that you thought I was the one that had you taken off this site, but all I did was that I had decided to cut and paste it in all sites in order to give people and idea of the jive-talk out there, and used it as a teachable moment of how to respond to that chaff of a one sided narrative and biased post. I think it looked like it your supporting this idea that irked some folks, but I never want to shut off ideas and I respond only as a member of this site and do not control the machinations of posts and blocks. I welcome anyone and talk to anyone who is also willing to listen to what I have to say, and respect it and acknowledge it, too-which is apparent in my responses to you above and thus far.

Yeah! Right!! Lapha ku khulluma owo-Mdabubu maje... Ha o sa kgone hore hlompha, o bua ka modimo oo wa hao, le rona her re tla bual leleme la rona re bue ka modimo wa rona. Uma usidelela, abanye bethu abancono kunawe empahkathini wethu bazakuyiqhapela le mekhwa yakho e nga qondile. Jwale he, wena ya ngotseng mona, ho tla tlameha o tsebe hore ke reng, o nkarabe ka hlompho le boikokobetso,.... We do not appreciate and nor accept your blessings for they are fake, and you know it. To me, you still need to learn how to respect Africans and their points of view... you are doing neither here...

Evelyn Clarke:

I quite understand everything that you have said. My Great Grandfather befriended his Chief in the Transkei during the 1800. During the Kaffarian Wars, W.J. Clarke wrote a book about how wrong the Colonials were, this included the white magistrates. If there was ever a white family who grew & understood the Xhosa very long ago, - it was my family!!! We loved them & they loved us. One story goes where W.J. Rode on his horse to the jail & had a fight with the magistrate to free his beloved Chief & 300 Impis. The same Chief ~together with 3 important Chiefs, sent a black man riding a horse with a white flag, into the war zone, with a message for W.J. The message was from the gig Chiefs that they wanted to see him. All the soldiers laughed & said that he was crazy to go out, that he must take a gun, mounted on a horse with a few soldiers to ensure his safety.

My Great Grandfather chose to WALK, UNARMED, with no SOLDIERS to go to the Chiefs, so he walked the one mile. Upon arriving, all of them sat on the ground & they wanted to know what he was doing there & they told him to “get out” because they wanted to attack the Colonials. Next day, after W.J. Left, the Xhosa s wiped the slate clean & many white Colonial soldiers died that day. What I'm trying to show you is the love that W.J. Had for the Xhosa people. We all grew up under black people, raw Pondos & Tembus, there is nothing that you can teach me of their suffering, we are intertwined with these people, we love them, they can never be separated from us, I love them with all my heart. I speak & write Xhosa, even think like a Xhosa. We don't know about our other Europeans Ancestors.

As far as we are concerned, the Queen of England threw us away. We belong to the Transkei now. My cousins have married Pondo women & I have coloured relatives. I dare not look down on them, who am I to do this? The Afrikaaner has done irrevocable harm to the English, Irish speaking Transkei Traders, - I am a living testament to this! My story has a happy ending. The Great Grandson of the Chief that was my Great Grandfathers best friend, is calling me to come back home to the very place that my Ancestor built. I will be the Chiefs guest & will be listening what he wants me to do. The love story continues, - even in the fourth generation! It was the Chief that said, “Why can't it be like that again?” I hope you could peep inside my heart, dear friend?

D.p.Lloyd is quite right, at the end of all our stories, - who are we, - really, - to judge or bear a grudge on anyone? Little ole me has also forgiven the Afrikaners for what the National Government has done to the Transkeians. I've had to forgive them for one simple reason & that is that our Lord has commanded us to love our ememies. - now to any normal thinking person, that's sounds impossible, but remember, God is God & we must obey because we are His children. That's how simple it is. There cannot be any arguments, no matter how much the Afrikaners have hurt & destroyed everything that us Transkei Traders have ever built up, its down now. The good news is that I can now get off th my clothese ground, - shake the dust off my clothes, & stop blaming the Afrikaaners, - roll the my sleeves up, - & actually DO something about my sad situation that I've found myself in. That's is exactly why our Living Heavenly Father is doing something about it, - He has looked down & His face is shinning on me!!!

Me:

I am not really interested into ya'lls sermons and they are not helping your cause here.. Please, either you practice and do what you believe for yourselves and I for one am nonplussed. I do not care what your religious or spiritual beliefs are and as for my history, I will make sure I write about it and tell our African people our story. I am not a preacher and do not care for one or organized religion per se. I am an African raised within my History culture, custom, and their practices, and languages. If there is anything you cannot offer about history, do not bother me with your sermonizing to me... I am not talking about God and religion at this point of our discourse ... Keep that to yourselves in your own abode. Or look for someone you can rework into your crew, I am not interested and will not respond to you if Religion is all you can talk about.. Look... Take your beliefs and religion to someone who will follow you, I am not interested in your ways of belief or religious practices your way. Thanks but no thanks. And by the way, it is my right and prerogative to say anything positive about African historyand be what I want and like...

Evelyn Clarke:

Yes it is your prorogative to say what you like & I appologise, - I did not know that you were an aethiest. Clearly it is Jehovah God that is bothering you, I will pray for your unbelief, one of our commandments is to love your enemies, - so I'm bound to love you! Goodbye!

Me:

'Atheist' is how it is spelled, and am neither that too nor anything you can imagine. You can sell your christian wares to those willing and of the same ilk. If I say I am what I told you what I am, respect that and stop putting labels as to what I am,.I think if it comes to prayer, do it for yourself because that is your modus operandi, not mine. As a person of African descent, as I am telling you something, it behooves you to learn and listen and respect that person without assuming what it is I am up to or not up to. I do not really care about what you call 'unbelief' and you do not even know the origins of the Ten Commandments of which you revert to.

I will not waste my time talking about beliefs and the Ten commandments to you, and try finding a convert some place else because to me, all what you profess is fake and you seem to be ignorant of that fact. As I have said, you really do not know me and whatever I am in life, So, please, stop and become your own christian with your beliefs in your heart, home and amongst those with whom you share such concerns and beliefs.. With me, you are barking at the wrong tree and a person. What I believe or not. practice or not, am or not, I have a human right to be or not to be(not in the Shakespearian mode) but as a fully and intelligently and opinionated African Person. Stop labeling me as I have not labeled not tried to define who you are.. I would be responding to your historical piece, but at this point, anyone who tells me to forget my history, must tell the jews to forgive and forget the concentration camps and what happened to them,. I will not compromise nor forget my history, and I will use these pages to disseminate history amongst African people, and if your people are interested, they can learn, too. Otherwise, your "Belief" is your concern, not mine. Whatever I am is not your concern nor for you to try and judge or define, because you will not be able to, and will not let you.. Ciao!

Evelyn Clarke:

Your last comment seems to be very lengthy. What I would like to tell you, Sir, is that you have STOLEN my post about the Afrikaaner s, - then you have seen to it that I got banned from “Concerned Africans”, I've only just worked it out! That is precisely why your consciounce can't go to rest, that why you write l-o-n-g rude messages to me. Voetsek now! - & I will un friend you, - so that I don't read another rude message from you!
Oh, before I block you. You STOLE my “Status” to premote yourself, - you are just a THIEF man!!!

Me:

Ya, that's what I expected.. An ignoramus with jingoistic and decrepit information... Why am I not surprised? I told you that you have fake religion and and faith and I know you are ahistorical and ignorant.. Your response above says a lot about you, and the article you posted or wrote. Oh, I am not responsible for your being cut-off this wall-it is your racist ideas which are biased and one-sided within that article. I am glad you 'unfrieneded' me and blocked me.. I will post this whole dialogue for all to see... Anyway, I will not swear at you to get my point across. And this I have done throughout out talk, I think you do not know what you are talking about and you are going to have to respect African people. or no one in the African world will want to listen to you. I did not steal your horrible post, I gave you full credit for it and posted it so that people can see what kind of person you are. I was right.. You are a real sad case and you need some help.. I will talk history and other topics I want to because 'I Write What I Like And Like What I Write..'(Biko-ism). You can visit my Wall and see my post.. I am not impressed with racist who are not smart to realize that their archaic and tired racist ideas about Africans have been relegated to the rubbish can of history.. Have a whatever day for your tortured self... You were banned because you are racist, and I answered you because I could see that you are ignorant... so, your irrational outbursts and swearing at me proves my point- you are really sick and sad, and you need help...


This is the type of drivel one has to contend with and deal with, effectively. She accused me of setting her up so that I could get her fired and thrown off the This Wall. I am not in the administration of this Wall and they are the one who call the shots. I answered her because her article was biased and one sided. I will not let such ogres from our past get way with the idea that they can say anything on these African Walls and get no sort of response. She was so mad that she even used an expletive.. I wish they had not edited it out. Anyway, whenever we come across these racist, it is important to fight them with facts and not necessarily opinions because all of us are entitled to our our own opinions, but facts remain facts. I do not use and abuse people on these viral social networks, all I do is stick to facts. Defending Africans has been a life-long passion of mine and I will do it to whatever end. I engaged Evelyn who contradicted herself saying that this was not her post, and in the next breadth accused me of being a thief and having stolen her post. No, I have given credit to her, which she at first denies and in the claims it to be her property. Well... this for us should be teachable moments where we can see that with knowing our history clearly concisely, definitively and concretely, we can withstand the vicissitudes of race wars...

Dr. John Henrik Clarke - You Have No Friends (full)

The Wretched of the Earth Paperback by Frantz Fanon

African History As Psychohistory

Our Past Never Forgets Us And Is Never Left Behind


The two posts I made of Philip and Clarke, followed by the video on top wherein Prof. Clarke debates Mary Lefkowitz, are prime examples of the attack brought upon African History by those Whites who still find it in themselves to talk about subjects they have no idea about, and their liberalism is betrayed by the way they talk about Africans, and that they like them', are in their "organizations", and they advocate "Africanism" to Africans, when they have not lived with them, nor are amongst them, as in the case of Lefkowitz, has never been to Africa before, but went many times to Greece, and the common talk-down they are used to talk to Africans like. Mary Lefkowitz was exposed for her lack of knowledge and literature, even African historians she did not consult in her "Not Out Of Africa Book".

They have little and low regard of African history and how it is told by Africans , for Africans. They are also not cognizant of African life, politics and everything about Africans, but they have a nerve, life Philip, to caution Africans if they do not stop "apologizing", claiming 'victimhood' that they well end up in their "dung and mud huts". It is interesting that Philip points out to the fact that I am 'overplaying" the historical importance of African's history, and yet he cites the doyen of Pan Africanism, Sobukwe, who spoke of all people being human, that if I listen to him, I will be better off. This needs to be negated and African History put into its proper pespective:

It is at this juncture that will use Wilson's colloquy about history to give gravitas to the assertion that I know that African history is important, and Wilson clarifies it this way:

"The study of history cannot be a mere celebration of those who struggled on our behalf. We must be instructed by history and should transorm history into concrete reality, into planning and development, into construction of power and the ability to ensure our survival as a people. ... Let us make sure that we look at and study history in a light such that it advances our interests, not inflates our egos and blinds us to reality.

"..We should look at history, more accurately, as Psychohistory, "i.e., the psychological result of undergoing certain historical experiences." We, as individuals, are our history. History is not that which is forgotten and left behind. We don't leave history behind. History is the present, history is the future. Those of us who are Afrocentric and mystical must know that the division of past. present, and future is false, Eurocentric and political. The world is not a linear structure. Past, where the present and future are one and the same. When we have been made to believe that the past is separate and in some straight line with the future, then we've already been brainwashed and set-up. Our past never forgets us and is never left behind.

"If you forgot your past, you would not be able to understand me right now. You would not be able to walk or talk. You did not learn to walk and talk and do the things you're doing at the moment you entered here; you learned them in the past. Forget that then! Since that is history, leave that behind. You will see that you also have no future! Past, present and future are one, and that proposition is at the center of an African-centered history and approach."As men with knowledge and desire ultimately make history, so does history make them."(Joel Kovell). So that, Wilson adds:

"History is a time dimension. History structures time, and all cultures have a time dimension related to them. So, when we let another people write history - and history is an arbitrary division of time - they define us within that division of time. .. Therefore, history as mythology, even if it tells the truth, by the very fact of its structuring of time, can still be used as propaganda, to manipulate, and create unreality in consciousness.

"European history to a considerable degree, attempts to control consciousness by the way it is presented. .. Even more pernicious that this is the fact that many of our people feel as if they do not come into existence and self-consciousness until they have been recognized by European historians. It's a very good psychology that rules us today; we are not famous until they make us famous; we are not anything until they make us something. Before that, we are nothing.

"History as propaganda, history as mythology, creates and brings into consciousness. History by Europeans is seen as a validation of truth. It establishes authority. It's a puzzling situation, as I've pointed out to my students, that we use as arbiters of truth those who have lied to us most. These are the kinds of contradiction that keep us crazy, and they are widespread. Consequently, we can only feel it is truth when it comes out of a European historical mouth - solely. Many of us, as individuals, seek to forget our history and do not want to confront our history because of the anxiety, the anger, the fear, the shame, the guilt we feel when we read/[see] some aspects of the African experience, and hence will often stay away from it. We think we have escaped its effects thereby.

And so, the idea that we don't know, that we're not aware of certain early experiences, does not mean that we have escaped their effects. In fact, it puts us more profoundly under the influence of these unknown forces.

"Through pretending to be amnesiac when some of us are not, by ridding himself/herself of his/her conscious remembrance of painful experiences he/she seeks to rid himself/herself of anxieties and fears connected with their past[we are simply running away from ourselves]. He/She may then succeed in forgetting those experiences completely, to the point where he/she cannot recall them, but this does not mean that those experiences do not continue to operate within his/her personality"

I can go on citing Wilson, but have to wrap up this article. As I have shown above, we have amongst us liberals and Africans who want to make sure that African people do not use their history to do anything with it. Whites, like Philip above, in a patronizing tone, attempts to 'teach us' about Africanism! There are some of us who use the strategy of ignoring things or issue/matters, that some read this stuff and act like they did not. Though, that is not my problem, but my worry is allowing these false agent provocateurs to control the dialogue, the definition of Africans, their history and talking down to Africans that we let slide by, because we want to preserve our statuses with the detractors of African people, no matter what they say and how they say it.

I for one will not let that go by me, and I will call out these pretenders and racists if they dare try and pull or play their game of downgrading Africans and their history, they will have to put up or shut up. Philip was trying very hard to use this Wall to hawk his decrepit book, promulgate his skewed "Africanist" ideas, under the cloak of of being a Pan africanist, but only ends up by bashing African History. Well, I for one will not stand idly by and let that slide. Reading from Biko and Wilson, we are at the beginning of where African people, if they read this whole article, will give themselves a fighting chance and an opportunity to be able to wrap their heads about the issues raised in here regarding the importance and the role African history plays in the lives and existence of African people of Mzantsi...

Dr John Henrik Clarke, Dr Yosef Ben Jochannan - What will We Tell Our Children

Discourse on Colonialism [Paperback] Aimé Césa

Facing Our Past and Refurbishing the Present

Form a United National Pride in the Future...

Theoretical Revolutionary Theory Will Come from the Assessment and Concrete Reality of the Poor Masses

I am an ardent advocate of Anything South African culture and its and am not backing off my stance. Why? It seems like few people really understand what is happening to us here in Mzantsi [A place down South of The Continent Of Africa] as the Africans fondly call their country. Well, I am editorializing about things South African and why it is so importantt to air these points of view On the Web and Social Media. Africans are currently facing a crisis amongst in their midst as African South Africans. I am not talking on behalf of those who have taken the responsibility that they are the middle class of South Africa. I am talking on behalf of the army of the poor and ignored. In the Townships, there are people who drink bails of water just to go to sleep; people who cannot receive medical help or never know when the next meal is coming from.

People are still suffering the devastating effects of alcoholism, malnutrition, mental illnesses; freezing and unheated houses; drug abuses and multiple devastating diseases. People used to bury on weekends only-now they do so everyday- the cemeteries are already full and other space is being sought; they suffer unemployment, messed-up education; they live with rats, rodents and some big and larger than cats; there are still many people living in shacks; the government is not taking care of the meek, weak, sick and poor as it should; Africans in Mzantsi are jeered at by everyone as being lazy, won't works; they still have to fight against the undercurrent maneuvers of their past enslavers who are manipulating foreign labor at the expense of local workers; enforced ignorance; women being raped; men being killed, drugged- In sum, Africans are worse-off than during the Apartheid era- and the people themselves say so too. Then, when I defend the defenseless of South Africa, some people who are African accuse me of being only an about South Africa. Well, Africans in South Africa are about to loose their current population and land, humanity, and facing extinction-albeit creeping up slowly, but consistently wiping them out in a myriad ways; have metal sickness, unemployed, deficient and poor public service and health delivery...

They see their land being parceled away to the highest bidders, amidst corruption. I am talking here, not about the rich and comfortable, but what is going on in the poor's lives... everything that they thought was theirs, is not. At the same time they have to fight against a relentless and determined enemy which has all the resources available like those with money, media and information control, so that when the oppressed raise their voices in disgruntlement they are told that they have to remember that they are more free than the whole of Africa(An old Apartheid logic-trumpeted by the presently ANC-lded government today). But we forget that Africa was not liberated in one swoop. The presently free countries in Africa went on over many years, and still those that were free such a long time ago, still have not resolved their internal contradictions in their respective countries.

South Africans are talking here of a mere 20 years and instead, they, the supposed-owners of South Africa and its wealth, are the wretched of the earth. How can Africans talk in terms of the continental unity when they still have to battle the West and the rest of those who think Africans in Africa and African South africans should not complain, protest in trying to push their national unity agenda, [of which none of these things have been accomplished], and should not protect themselves and their lands with their a natural wealth and abundance. Africans are still reeling from the 48 straight years of the worst form of Naziism(Apartheid) with its presently continuing effort to eliminate, confuse, and oppress/depress/suppress and dehumanize Africans-and the [resent-day ANC ruling Party is in cahoots with them..

Africans in South Africa are facing a predatory and gendarme rogue and quisling vulture government bent on fleecing and enriching/deepening their pockets at the expense of the poor African locals. Some people think that South Africa is New York, and they have the right to do as they please, even if they are not indigenous to the place... Others(From North of South Africa) act like they're fighting for issues for Africans, and that South Africans are not fighting for Africa's Prosperity and Autonomy! Preposterous!. Some of our South African African brothers think that they are White or More Europeans than Africans from the North Of South Africa, and you can tell from the way they are talk, act, behave and plan their lives and ignore their culture, tradition,customs, practices,languages and sacred rites. They quickly run away from the present morbid and dreadful conditions of their bleak existence with the hope that if they concentrate elsewhere, they might find respite from the present harsh realities of their witnessing and facing their extinction. And in doing so, nothing has changed,and thing are deteriorating and getting worse for poor Africans of Mzantsi

Thus far, what the people of Mzantsi see there is nothing that they can be proud of or claim as theirs - therefore, my insistence on the preservation of South Africa culture, custom, traditions, languages and practices and rites is not because they have any handle on it, but because the people do not feel like their in control of refurbishing and recalibrating their culture, and it and them are barely recognizable, nor is it fully acknowledged by most of them as a power tool and edifying entity towards renewing, recreating, reinventing and re-forming their Sense of Nationhood and Nationness. Poor education is disempowering African people of South africa, that is, unless one has money to send their child to better schools, those who cannot afford it are doomed are doomed. So, there is Aparthiedized pantheon of educating levels that are affecting the Teaching and Learning Of Africans in south africa

Without knowing,practicing and respecting their cultures, customs, traditions, history, music and dance, there is now a proliferation of mental illness and total amnesia about what as Africans they should be doing, or what their identity means to them and how to move on with it into the burgeoning future, the 21st century and beyond, is dysfunctional and dumbing down the Africans of Mzantsi down. This calamity and dysfunction is eroding the true social fabric of our people; its disappearing millions of people due to HIV-AIDS, TB; cholera; high blood pressure, sugar diabetes, kidney failure; depression, repression; genocidal attrition... Everyday of their liver lives... By Ignoring Culture and all else I mentioned above is what is the the real course of the present intellectual and academic menticide, Coilonial Mental disorders,dysfunction and working towards elevating the cultures, traditions, customs, history, languages, practices of sacred rites will alleviate the suffering the africans are facing today in Mzantsi.

South Africa is in Africa but it is run by everybody except the African masses of Africans in South africa. You cannot talk of fixing your neighbors houses before you put yours in order. One cannot overlook the importance of building ones' Street, Township, Province without first taking care of and hold of all that which is local-family, housing, street, Townships and so forth. How can these leaders talk of fixing Africa which has so many different countries run by the West and the East? Why pretend like they can take on this mammoth task whilst the city states within Africa are dependencies of the West and the Rest of the Capitalist vultures lurking within and owning African and Africa's mines, farms, railway system, African land, all the metropolitan towns and our labor power? It really does not add up.

How can this lack of control and ownership help in the reunification of Africa if the Africans of South Africa are not even having a smidgen of unity; a semblance of a nation; neither controllers of their economy, media, sports, arts, dance,music, culture, tradition, custom, practices, languages manufacturing, you name it. Africans in South Africa, as a collective, are not holders of rights to everything that is enclosed within the borders of that country as a nation or the indigenous rightful owners of all that is in and within South africa?. These questions still linger on, and African people are dying by their millions from a myriad of ailments in this putrid and decrepit South Africa.. yearly... all the time-as I am onto this article about their dying.. And they are going crazy -or say metal diseases in many numbers than before; and their cultures, customs, traditions, history, languages, dance,music and all is not in their service nor made to work for them-instead it is owned and controlled by outsiders more than the African people themselves-and these foreigners call the usurpation of African everything, their 'own intellectual property". Some of these foreign Cultural hawkers claim that they have Intellectual property ownership and rights to what is not theirs but that of Africans in South Africa- an they are going through multiple gyrations in trying to own and control and disseminate, as they see fit, and as it profits them, with care or concern as to hat Africans of South Africa have to say about this theft and Imperial Cultural bullies..

Nobody has asked Africans of South Africa as to what is really going on here in Mzantsi. Everyone knows that they can get a piece of action, but as to the locals, they are dismissed and are not even listened to.. I am raising this issue knowing that it is going to raise the ire of some people- so be it. What do I have to loose but raise pertinent issues of nation, custom, culture, traditions, languages, practice and rites and their being African South African and for them and should be run and controlled and owned by Africans of South Africa-I see nothing wrong with that.... What do Africans have to lose but their already lost land, its resources and all that is contained in it. Africans need to fight even harder, irk some people, maybe find some allies, if possible, but fight this war which has morphed into many differentiated fronts.

I am identifying those fronts here, and I do not want any compensation for it. But I will use this viral media to get my point across- and I am using many new technologies to get this type of message- through Blogs, Internet radio, journal posts and writing; FM and Television-Worldwide to make our concern to be at the forefront of the global purview. Below I will be going deeper and making the points above more clearer and I embarked on a project which I will be discussing in a short while below

Everyone comes to South Africa and African South Africans cannot go out as they please for many reasons. African People have been purposefully kept ignorant, penniless, poor and oppressed up to this day; books are hard to come bye; the media is white-owned; Malls are white-owned; Whites still own 83% of the land; if you ask the locals what's going on, they will tell you that the sad thing is that really nothing is going on, or nothing has changed for them, but instead, they are now living in hell without a choice of changing the order of things inside the country.

The say, as matter of fact and conviction that "Our brothers are our enemies;

"our children disrespect us elders; our social mores and norms have been sacked, flaunted and discarded. We really never had 'freedom of speech', economic self sufficiency nor educational development where teaching and learning should take place; we do not own our own businesses and are attacked from any imaginable angle; we are the most deprived on knowledge, information and at the tail-end of this modern era as a technologically come up as a disempowered people," and they always answer in one or the many ways I have pointed out above and more.

To have people decry the fact that they should not be living under such coditions in the land of their birth, and have begun to see their lives ebb away because of currpution and other things, is to see how disconcerting it is for them, because they note that they are being ignored and sidelined in the land of their birth; but mainly because they see to be lsoosing the "The Cultural War", and it(African Culture) has never be attaked in a way that utilizes the present technology and relaying information that can get to the people; or conversely, get under the skin of the roving capitalists vulture of all stripes and ethnicities within their midst. The people have stopped being proactive, and have not had time to ameliorate their present condition; or to seriously begin to mount a revolutionary path towards addressing and setting all these social maladjustments and maladaptive societies and individuals and as a people, collectively. If I have to advocate for South Africa, I will do so with gusto and much energy. I approach the issue of Africa from many points of view, and will mostly attack it, as in the case of this Hub, from a historical cultural point of view.

Afrikans in science - Dr Ivan Van Sertima

Unity and Struggle: Speeches and Writings of Amilcar Cabral [Paperback] Basil Davidson

Pinch Of African Fighters/Seers As Radical Thinkers

Rumination of A Guerilla Fighter: Cabral


M.K Rwantsane made the following suggestion and posed this question below:

M.K. Rwantsane:

"this month of January i have commited myself to reading about Cabral & Lumumba.
Can anyone tell me why i choose them?"

Me:

I decided to take the cudgel(to think hard) and since I like and think his works are of a genuine guerilla fighter who 'has been there-and done that' I found him legit and honest about how he saw and executed the Struggle carried out by the Partido Africano da Independencia da Guine e Cabo Verde(PAIGC).

I am therefore making some "Repost" of what I had posted earlier in the middle of the past 2012 year., and will will write up some of his ideas as an opening salvo to this discourse and diatribe about Cabral, specifically.

"The Struggle For African's Revolution Cannot Be Achieved Through jaundiced and Jingoistic Prattles."

I know for a fact that African peoples aphorisms are relevant when they say:
"The Path Going Forward is Asked from those Who Went Before, or ahead". (A loose translation of "Tsela e botswa ho ba pele/kapa bao ba ileng ba e tsamaya"). I will cull from Cabral who seems to buttress the meagre observations I have made above in a more elaborative and broader sense, so as to lay some groundwork as to 'what is to be, and needs, to be done':


"We are not going to use this platform to rail against imperialism. An African saying very common in our country says: "When your house is burning, i's of no use beating the tom-toms. ... For us, the best or worst shout against imperialism, whatever its form, is to take up arms and fight. This is what we are doing, and this is what we will go on doing until all foreign domination of our African homelands has been totally dominated.

"Our agenda includes subjects whose meaning and importance are beyond question and which show a fundamental preoccupation with 'struggle'. We note, however, that one form of struggle which we consider to be fundamental ... is the 'struggle against our own weaknesses'. Our experience has shown us that in the general framework of daily struggle, this battle against ourselves-no matter what difficulties the enemy may create-is the most difficult of all, whether for the present or the future of our peoples. This battle is the expression of the internal contradictions in the economic, social, "cultural" (and therefore, historical) reality of each of our countries. We are convinced that any rational or social revolution which is not based on knowledge of this fundamental reality runs grave risk of being condemned to failure.

"However, we must recognize that we ourselves and the other liberation movements in general (referring here above all to the African experience) have not managed to pay sufficient attention to this important problem in our struggle.
The ideological deficiency, not to say the total lack of ideology, within the national liberation movements-which is basically due to ignorance of the 'historical reality' which these movements claim to transform-constitutes one to the greatest weaknesses of our struggle against imperialism, if not the greatest weakness of all.... A full discussion of this subject could be useful to many subjects, and would enable the [movement] to make a valuable contribution toward strengthening the present and future actions of national liberation. This would be a concrete way of helping these movements, and in our opinion, no less important than political support or financial assistance for arms and such like.
It is with the intention of making a contribution, however modest, to this debate that we present here our opinion of "the foundations and objectives of national liberation in relation to the social structure."

"Our refusal, based as it is on concrete knowledge of the socio-economic reality of our countries, and on the analysis of the process of development of this phenomenon of class, leads us to conclude that if class struggle is the motive force of history, it is so only in a specific historical period (I have addressed this point somewhat in my earlier post about history). It is not difficult to see that this factor in the history of each human group is the "mode of production"-the level of productive forces and the pattern of ownership-characteristic of that group. ... It therefore seems correct to conclude that the level of productive forces, the essential determining element in the content and form of class struggle, is the true and permanent motive force of history.

"Thus, we see that our peoples have their own history regardless of the stage of their economic development. when they were subjected to imperialist domination,the historical process of each of our peoples (or of the human groups of which they are composed) was subjected to the violent action of an external factor. This action-the impact of imperialism on our societies-could not fail to influence the process of development of the productive forces in our countries and the social structures of our countries, as well as the content and form of our national liberation struggles.

"But we also see that in the historical context of the development of these struggles, our peoples have the concrete possibility of going from their present situation of exploitation and underdevelopment, to a new stage of their historical process which can lead them to a higher from of economic, social and "cultural" existence. (Amilcar Cabral.)


It is not only a certain specific type of History, that of past and ancient civilizations that is only of concern here, but contemporary history is just as relevant as the one above about how to conduct and execute a revolution. Cabral explains above what are the nitty-gritty or struggle for African people Just as in the struggle for liberation of a people, the ideas that shape the struggle are akin to those of when one write the history of Africans. It is important to infuse and suffuse the article above with different ideas about how to project, present and rewrite African history that matter here. What I mean is that, different themes and narrative about a history of a people cannot afford to be one-dimensional, but multi-pronged.

As I present the ideas of Cabral which enlighten the historical narrative about the masters of African history, it is important to use other Master historians in their element, speciality and erudition to edify and solidify the information base and data about the history of African people one is writing about. At this juncture, it is also important to learn from Bantu Biko, and flesh-out his ideas that share some light as to the distortion and degrading of African history: that is, his insights and and prophetic ruminations are so relevant today that it is very weird and spooky...This is what Bantu Biko wrote as to what it is Africans of South Africa, wherever writing Africa SouthAfrican history should pay attention to and dovetail their ideas and efforts towards writing history and nation-building-also, giving his take on what type of society the Africans of society are like:

"The Prophetic And Relevant Insights Of Biko"

"As one Black(African) writer says, colonialism is never satisfied with having the native in its grip, but, by some strange logic, it must turn to his past and disfigure and distort it. Hence, the history of the Black(African) man in this country is most disappointing to read. It is presented merely as a long succession of defeats. the Xhosas were thieves who went to war for stolen property; the Boers never provoked the Xhosas but merely went on "punitive expeditions" to teach the thieves a lesson.

"Heroes like Makana (early nineteenth-century Xhosa prophet, sentenced to life imprisonment on Robben Island and drowned while escaping in a boat. Refusal by Blacks(Africans) to accept the truth of his death led to the mythical hope of his eventual return), who were essentially revolutionaries are painted as superstitious trouble-makers who lied to the people about bullets turning into water. Great nation-builders like Shaka are cruel tyrants who frequently attacked small clans for no reason but for some sadistic purpose. Not only is there no objectivity in the history taught us, but there is frequently an appalling misrepresentation of facts that sicken even the uninformed student.

"Thus, a lot of attention has to be paid to our history(culture, music and dances, etc.-my addition), if we as Blacks (Africans) want to aid each other in our coming to consciousness. We have to rewrite our history and produce in it the heroes the heroes that formed the core of our resistance to the White invaders. More has to be revealed, and stress has to be laid on the successful "NATION-BUILDING" [I have just posted a piece on my evaluation of what I worked here on FB on a project about our culture: Dance and Music - and wrote about that project and projection (see my posted article by scrolling down on the wall, and it is titled "A Review Of The Posted Cultural Videos Of The People Of Mzantsi"), attempts of men such as Shaka, Moshweshwe [Faku] and Hintsa. these areas call for intense research to provide some sorely needed missing links. We would be too naive to expect our conquerors to write unbiased histories about us, but we have to destroy they myth that our history starts fro 1652, the year Van Riebeeck landed at the Cape.

"Our culture must be described in concrete terms. We must relate the past to the present and demonstrate a historical evolution of the modern Black(African) man/woman. There is a tendency to to think of our culture as a static culture that was arrested in 1652 ad has never developed since. The "return to the bush" concept suggests that we have nothing to boast of except lions, sex and drink. We accept that when colonization sets in it devours the indigenous culture and leaves behind a bastard culture that may thrive at the pace allowed it by the dominant culture.
"But we also have to realize the basic tenets of our culture have largely succeeded in withstanding the process of bastardization and that even at this moment we can still demonstrate that we appreciate a man for himself. Ours is a true man-centered society whose sacred tradition is that of sharing. We must reject, as we have been doing, the individualistic cold approach to life that is the cornerstone of the Anglo/Boer culture. [some people on FB tell us whatever they say is the bottom line, with many exclamation marks to whit).
"We must seek to to restore to the Black(African) man the great importance we used to give to human relations; the high regard for people and their property and for life in general; to reduce the triumph of technology over man and the materialistic element that is slowly creeping into our society. [It is as if Biko is Alive, Today!]

These are essential features of our Black(African) culture to which we must "cling". Black(African) culture above all implies freedom on our part to innovate without recourse to White values. This innovation is part of the natural development of any culture of the natural development of any culture. A culture is essentially the society's composite answer to the varied problems of life. We are experiencing new problems every day and whatever we do adds to the richness of our cultural heritage "as long as it has man at its center". The adoption of Black(African) Theater and drama is one such important innovation which we need to encourage and develop. "We Know That Our Love Of Music and Rhythm Has Relevance Even In This Day".. (I stressed Bantu's words in italics)].

'I Could Not Have Said It Any Better, Even If I have Tried On My Recent Post'!- Very eerie and spooky vision!

Closing Thoughts: FB and The Making and Discourse about "Change" in Mzantsi

To add up and add another perspective from Wilson who says that according to Ronald Leifer (1969) defined the ethnicization of psychotherapy "as the molding and polarization of behavior so that it conforms to prevailing cultural patterns. It is indoctrination or training for culturally specific traits, attitudes, and actions." thus, Wilson states that "The aim of ethnicized psychotherapy is to return the deviant to "Normal", i.e., to instil in the deviant a set of particular traits, attitudes, values, behavioral orientations, and goals which when pursued or realized, support and maintain the political-economic social status quo along with its ruling elite ... Ethnicized psychotherapy, too, views any form of behavior and state of consciousness which do not conform to the norms or political-economic interests of the ruling establishment or group as, "by definition, a reflection of individual maladjustment, emotional immaturity, mental pathology, or some other negatively valued concept". Thus, problems which may be reflective of social and political problems are dismissed as the ailments of isolated individuals, as evidence of individual maladjustment, the epiphenomena of a distorted personality and economic forces which generate their existence from. " This, according to me, and also, according to your quote above, is designed and 'guaranteed to make us sick and crazy" as Africans are now here in Mzantsi....!
Tshikosi cited this piece from Amos Wilson:

SUCCESSFUL FAILURE:

"Success can be a type of failure. That is one reason why success does not bring the kind of personal satisfaction and peace that many people seek. And why often the individual, despite all of the material evidences of having succeeded, still feels psychologically cheated - because one can achieve for the wrong reason. So when we achieve to prove to somebody else, to show the white-folk that we can do it as good as they do it, it is a success that still is guaranteed to make us sick" - Dr.Amos Wilson

Me:

Wilson says that according to Ronald Leifer (1969) defined the ethnicization of psychotherapy "as the molding and polarization of behavior so that it conforms to prevailing cultural patterns. It is indoctrination or training for culturally specific traits, attitudes, and actions." Thus, Wilson states that "The aim of ethnicized psychotherapy is to return the deviant to "Normal", i.e., to instil in the deviant a set of particular traits, attitudes, values, behavioral orientations, and goals which when pursued or realized, support and maintain the political-economic social status quo along with its ruling elite ... Ethnicized psychotherapy, too, views any form of behavior and state of consciousness which do not conform to the norms or political-economic interests of the ruling establishment or group as, "by definition, a reflection of individual maladjustment, emotional immaturity, mental pathology, or some other negatively valued concept".

"Thus, problems which may be reflective of social and political problems are dismissed as the ailments of isolated individuals, as evidence of individual maladjustment, the epiphenomena of a distorted personality and economic forces which generate their existence from." This, according to me, according to your quote above, is designed and 'guaranteed to make us sick and crazy" as Africans are now here in Mzantsi....!
Well, Tshiks, both of us are cognizant of the fact that African people are sick and made so in a myriad ways, and we're immersed in and embedded into this oppressive ANC juggernaut and it feels like Africans are still riding the back of a tiger, and that they need to begin to learn and read about the causes of our dysfunction and sickness without being belligerent, ignorant and spiteful of each other, as we have see happen here on the Facebook.

Getting their act together is recognizing and diagnosing their social malaise, and act in the midst of the African people by affecting their suffering and creating programs and helping, without sounding of like dummies knocking against each other on the FB; and, in the final analysis, the madness, sicknesses and psychological malfunction needs to be checked, and as I have been saying throughout this year now ending- African people need to come up with better results next year and hope that will be the case-Africans of south africa are far much more better than what and where they are now.

However one uses "ENGLISH", as this issue has been raised by reactionary Africans to the upliftment of African people so long as it drives home concrete lesson and teachable moments which are so sorely needed-who cares how that "ENGLISH" is used, and the very critics use the same 'master's language to crush those they dislike', for dumb, ignorant, vindictive and regressive reasons like "how other people use 'Big English' whenever they write or post stuff on FB,they write English"- As if that's a point worth talking about in these dire times in Mzantsi. Instead of the ideas and the information this "ENGLISH" is sharing by the one using it to parlay and relay important information and organizing ideas and strategies-to elucidate(clarify) some points about the struggle of Africans here at South Africa-the opt to attack the usage of English , meanwhile they themselves use the same English to critic what they do not like!. This is part of our sickness and madness, and the sooner they recognize it as such, the better Africans will be able to combat and rectify these sicknesses, as per Wilson, and what they can see for themselves where they live(for some of those who still live in Kasi( mo-lokishini [Townships], and never left it) ...

As I have said, I join and belong to no organization, but by virtue of being an African, I have the right to my opinions and have to respect other's opinions too. With this spirit in mind, Each one Teach One; Each One Reach One...

African music compilation - 38 minutes of african melodies

The Music of Africa [Paperback] J. H. Kwabena. Nketi

African Music: A People's Art Paperback by Francis Bebey

Developing Talking Musical Cultural/Historical Points And Shifting the Paradigm

African Polyrhythmic-Roots-Rocking-Rhythms:

Any culture does not allow for stagnation; each culture manages to learn from other cultures, but keep itself unique to itself. Many races or people throughout the world perform and manifest their culture whilst maintaining this uniqueness, that which one can can discern by interrogating certain aspects of those cultures, like in the case of the Hub above, music, dance and cultural garb.

I have been posting various types of music in their specific genres, and this means that different music is sung in different languages, since the music I post is from different countries, this means that whoever is listening might not understand the language, but the music is universal(that is, the rhythm, sound melodies and the playing of various instrument and different dances), and most them have different musical style, tones and accentuation as do their languages.. But what is important and common about these musical acts and sounds, is that they are being selected from an African Centered Perspective. Were people to find time and read-upon the origins and histories of these groups, one would be struck at the similarities of experiences experienced by these musicians, in their different countries throughout their different struggles-as being the same. This is important to note.

If one were to listen to Eldridge cleaver, he issued this aphorism in the same spirit of what I had just discussed above when he informs us that:

"Until Black(African) people as a whole gain power, it's not a question of where you are geographically if you Black (African); it's a question of where you are psychologically. No matter where you place Black(African) people under present conditions, they'll still subject to the whims and decisions of white political, economic and [psychological] apparatus."

Why I am using this citation is the simple reason that Africans have to begin to understand their situation not only regionally, nationally or continentally, but look at it from a global perspective. This will help African people become more aware and sensitized to this issue of African musical culture as really Global-and if that is hard to conceive, africans cannot change or shift any existing paradigms that chain them to their colonial past and presently stifled and oppressive-drudged continued existence. The will operate with blinkers in a Globe that is Web-driven in its vastness and content, spread, depth and speed of data and metadata. Africans cannot dig in into their heels when they have to move into the 21st century and beyond. This means knowing, learning and understanding the African struggle in all its formats as it is International as much as local where it is based for each individual and nation-it is one common struggle.

In fact, some of Africans are so caught -up with trying to be very Europeans in how they imbibe or groove to the music, clothing, dances and European culture, so long it is not their local music, and not African, in many cases. This you can find all over the globe, and it is not unique to one people. But it applies to all the oppressed because most of them have not yet been liberated themselves, or psychologically and within their societies. African selves are chained, to their societies which are incarcerated in a Kraal setting..

I remember reading somewhere about Duke Ellington that he moved the music which we know as Jazz from "Jungle Music" to what we call Jazz(I guess-bleached sounds). African Music globally is not "Jungle Music", but it is human music. Imagine we have to actually say that and try to qualify and uplift it to the level of it being human-preposterous! Yet, this is what those oppressed around the world, have been sold to, bamboozled with and dry-cleaned to the extend that they ignore their music, cultures and so forth, because they are avoiding their selves and ignoring by running away from themselves-as Bob Marley sings: "YouCan't Running Away From Yourself.." This action by those Africans who indulge in it, muddies the cultural arena and leaves it with a schizophrenic reaction. It becomes dysfunctional because it vibrates and imitates the primary ruling culture at the expense of the indigenous culture.

This means that people, instead of practicing and elaborating their culture, their focus and attention has been turned askance and it behaves like a parrot and and apes and imitate to the letter or action, the European lived-life, life-style of individualism and consumerism, clothing, cars, languages, tourism and the whole bit.

Frantz Fanon writes:

But the War goes on. And for many years to come we shall be bandaging the countless and sometimes indelible wounds inflicted on our people by the colonialist onslaught. Imperialism, which today is waging war against a genuine struggle for human liberation, sows seeds of decay here and there that must be mercilessly rooted out from our land and from our minds."

It is at tis point I concur with Fanon that some psychiatric pow-wow will be in order here. Fanon informs us thusly:

"We had no control over the fact that the psychiatric phenomena, the metal behavioral disorders emerging from this was, have loomed so large among the perpetrators of "pacification" and the "pacified" poplulation. The truth is that colonization, in its very essence, already appeared to be a great purveyor of psychiatric hospitals. since 1954, we have drawn the attention of French and international psychiatrists in scientific works to the difficulty of "curing" a colonized subject correctly, in other words, making him thoroughly fit into a social environment of the colonial type.

"Because it is a systematized negation of the other, a frenzied determination to deny the other any attribute of humanity, colonialism forces the colonized to constantly ask the question: "Who am I in reality?"

The defensive positions born of this violent confrontation between the colonized and the the colonial institute a structure which them reveals the colonized personality. In order to understand this "sensibility" we need only to study and appreciate the scope and depth of the wounds attributed on the colonized during a single day under a colonial regime We must remember in any case that a colonized people is not just a dominated people. Under the German occupation, the French remained human beings. Under the French occupation, the Germans remained human beings. In Algeria, there is not simply domination, but the decision, literally, to occupy nothing else but territory. The Algerians, the women dressed in haiks, the palm groves, and the camels form a landscape, the natural backdrop for the French presence.

"A hostile, ungovernable, and fundamentally rebellious Nature is in fact synonymous in the colonies with t he bush, the mosquitoes,the 'natives', and disease. Colonization has succeeded once tis untamed Nature has been brought under control. Cutting railroads through the bush, draining swamps, and 'igoring' the political and economic existence of the 'native' population are in fact one and the same thing.

"When colonization remains unchallenged by armed resistance, when the sum of harmful stimulants exceeds a certain threshold, the colonized defenses collapse, and many of them end up in psychiatric institutions. In the clam of this period of triumphant colonization, a constant and considerable stream of mental symptoms are direct sequel of this oppression."

There are a myriad ways challenge the colonization of the African mind, culture, customs, traditions, languages, dances, traditional dress, and writing about it and putting it into the correct African perspective is another front of another 'type' of war which must be waged and decisively won. Learning, knowing, understanding, formulating ideas and actions, collating and assembling a cultural mosaic of the culture that is the culture of Africans in South Africa, is even much more demanding today,more than ever.

The mental degradation, in this case I will walk on top of Fanon's words and say :When the Cultural Colonial Wars are not challenged by Cultural awareness and consciousness, when the total amount of these offensive maneuvers succeed and 'exceeds a certain threshold', the colonized consciousness, awareness and sensitivity to his/her culture collapses and goes awol, and many of the South Africans today are not only in mental institutions, but are splintered and filtered and strewn throughout the townships. and, villages/rural and suburban entities and enclaves,houses and the flats, of which this menticide is having a devastating impact and effect on the social fabric, mores, norms and so on, and setting Back African nation-building efforts which Fanon speak about the 'indelible effect to the wounds Africans might never be able to recover from.

This is contemporary history of events that took place centuries ago, and are being pursued with such zeal and glee, that it is still a wonder why Africans are not waking up.. Or is it that these effects were complete and dominant in their being applied to the oppressed? Will the Oppressed have a collective psychological come-togeterness, to the extend that they will unchain their locked minds? Since I have confidence in the intelligence of the collective mind of Africans, as they learn and come to grasp with their present futile reality, they will work it a situation which will benefit them all.. At this learning stages, it is a matter of trying to write such Hubs to raise that awareness, sensitivity and consciousness of African From an African cultural point of view, and create a foundation for further discussions and lessons to be made possible for the African masses to learn form, and develop their own collective intelligence to achieve their desired ends. Knowing, controlling and designing one's culture is power manifold over all the attendant and rippling Culture Wars


Then there is this perception that when one plays or posts music, some complain that those doing the posting, they are not 'seriously' carrying out the struggle". That could not be far from the truth. The Music of any people is the soundtracks of their lives, culture and so on. It is to one as breathing is to our lives. They ignore music that uses a language that they do not understand, or have been conditioned in a sort of "Kraal" mind-set enclosure in one's existence through the laws, regulation, tricks, fraud, corruption and use of force that is administered to those who resiste-and those that cave in-they lose; so that, the act of brutal oppression, increased the intensity of the production of radical music as one would breath hard when fighting. Music that was being produced resonated with the masses and they identified with it. Music became the vehicle of collective action and collectively moving the struggle ahead. So, it has never been a non-issue, music, dance and so on. These have been the fulcrum and orbital or starting point of many other struggles the ensued thereafter.

Writing is just like music. One needs to compose it. In the case of writing, you compose whatever it is from social experience-as does music, in the sense and vein of the rest of this Hub-strivng to be original. When as a people you originate ideas and other mass participatory actions and collective application towards one's goals, you become more legit and real. You cannot live your life as a duplicate of a manufactured you. One cannot live a life that is not relevant to their lives-music unites people because it touches their common plight, and lives. You cannot listen to music that does not harken back to your own social experience. To ignore or refuse to acknowledge that ones music is a pathway to sanity, then, one will be left lollygagging within a mix which corrodes their inner core and souls.

African Musical systems: Notes on African sounds

Just like writing, we develop our musical talking points about music that originates from our inner sanctum and soul-as per our common experiences and commonly lived-lives. To shift paradigms is to totally change a way that is not compatible with ones well-beingness-to one that is relatable to ones existence and reality. Music appreciation is something one grows up and finds people one is born into listening or playing it.

This also means that, since then it is human music, it compels one to focus on the local motion and spread one's listening preferences to a global appreciating audience. If what we say amongst ourselves, we do not trust nor believe it, because one of the same oppressed as us is saying it, means that when we begin to listen and participate, imbibe and consume our 'high' culture, we have shifted a preset, concrete reality that was an inhibitor to our spiritual, musical, intellectual or otherwise development. We change the way we are conditioned and are made to see, think and behave, it is in this way that we will see ourselves anew and begin to see the way we are educing ourselves to.

I for one believe in the emancipation of Africans throughout the world, even music is one way of the many ways of doing it. Another way is cobbling together African musical experiences into an article such as this one to begin to expand and extend our listening range to African music we are not familiar with, which can be found in a narrow category, world-wide, and I choose to simple dub it to be African Music Systems- so as to shift gears in appreciation of this art form and recognize its African origin, commonness and one experience and humanness in the vibe and rhythms. We should 'validate' African being ourselves and not wait for someone to box us or keep us in a cage that we sit in and be satisfied with. We dare explore ourselves and sounds without let-up as part of waging our struggle for psychological liberation of a people who still have to realize that freedom.

If people gave themselves time and opened themselves to the possibility that we have a "high Culture" in music, their consciousness and actions and appreciations would change. Then the people would stop being spectators(as Biko so pithily concurred) or their daily oppression, depression, dehumanization and suppression that so disdainfully and cruelly manifested itself in their collective midst and psyche so boldly throughout their history and current reality, that in the end, they might make an attempt or serious effort at dislodging, shifting of displacing these current deadening and dumbing -down post-colinial paradigms, which, by the way, is also pressing as urgent and of critical importance - like any crucial part or point of the Struggle of african people. Our African music is powerful and soulful, we just need to listen, or take it, for its out there in the musical viral stream. (You can read my Hub titled "African Music Is High Culture: The Power of song in the Struggle for Survival."

The same with the historical lectures of Porfessor Clarke in this Hub, one needs to take time and listen to them and find the Hostoriography of Africans laid bare by the Master Teacher of African Hisotry in person. The writing of this section of this Hub as I have done above, is part of an ongoing experimentation that I have been carrying out thorughout the Hub, that of follwoing Dlarkes encouragement that we should write Africans history from an African perspective, and tis section is what I am attempting to d do, as I have done so throughout theis Hub.

Dr. John Henrik Clarke: BLACK Leadership is FAKE & INCOMPETENT

Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey (Dover Thrift Editions) Paperback by Marcus Garvey

Africana Critical Theory: Reconstructing The Black Radical Tradition, From W. E. B. Du Bois and C. L. R. James to Frantz Fanon and Amilcar Cabral [Paperback] Re

"A Better Future Is One With A Human Face"

Grasping the concept of Theory as a weapon

Here in Mzantsi, and particularly here on Facebook, There are people who are barking for revolution and cannot really wrap their heads around what they are advocating. If you really want a revolution, as I have already stated in my earlier post about history, here on this Hub, and the post I had just cited or written from Cabral, one message is consistently popping up: Africans need to learn from other revolutions and we need to READ! Also, they need to try and come up with solutions, ideas and better ways of managing their problems and their struggle; try and found or initiate more informed and organized ways of managing the media; write more articles and talk to the people about the media, history, culture, customs, etc. -and in the end putting up a human face onto the future post revolution-and it is from such activities and actions that Africans shall be able to develop a language that is infected and inflected and also spurred-on by the actions and activities of, by, with-within and through the people who are all professing to fight for and represent suffering African masses. Ideologues, demagogues, charlatans and Bullies in any struggle do not live long, and bullies are the ones who are sabotaging the struggle itself, no matter their intentions. One not only wants to rally their base, but one also wants to shape and influence international opinions about what one are struggling about. A revolutionary does not talk-down to or dress down those whom they want to help liberate, let alone berate them here on Facebook with rickety and tired slogans and obdurate and obtuse rants that are not what the African struggle is all about.

I myself do not consider myself a revolutionary in-as-much as I think and know that I am an "Mzantsian" with all what that means. I have right to agree and disagree, and not be intimidated of be bullied through the remote-FB posting of people who call for death and guns, because they are able to afford the Internet, sitting in the comfort of their big houses' and "Mercks" and "BMW", "Crackberries" and "iPods"-if not using and laden with the latest accoutrements and condiments of recently acquired material thieved wealth, and expensive sofas and the whole chakalaka.
My point is, if we are to use FB and other social mediums and media to talk revolution, we better be prepared to work and post some good stuff than can be used by the polity we are targeting. This is what Sankara, has to say about this despicable false revolutionary declarations and retorts:

"We must now move on to a much more conscious level of organization. The first days of the revolution were days of enthusiasm, euphoria - a festival. Now we must organize ourselves on a much more scientific, methodical level and make corrections every step of the way in order to go forward! Where organizations like ours have existed, there have been failures. In certain countries, reactionary forces have triumphed over these organization(A la revolutionary movements of South Africa). We must be conscious of our weaknesses (as I have touched up on some of these weaknesses below) We must never cease to struggle - to struggle and to keep in mind that the Committees for the Defense of the Revolution (CDR) signify above all, courage, political courage, the courage to live up to our responsibilities."

Sankara continues: "We are not CDR members just so that we can shout slogans, but so that we can rise consciousness, act, and produce. This is why "we should banish empty slogans - these futile and tiresomely repetitive and ultimately irritating slogans - from our demonstration(and I think Sankara would say that on the FB if he were alive). You arrive at a demonstration and someone shouts, "Homeland or Death, we will triumph!" twenty-five times. It's beginning to be a bit much, especially when there is no solid, militant explanation with it! It's just repetition ... we are just improvising slogans to fill up time, so you get "Down with thieves!" Down with liars!"

"It's not good! We should differentiate ourselves from folk theater troupes. At some shows we see crude scenes where comrades sometimes perform obscene dances. This is not revolutionary either. The revolution should have its sense of decency.
We need to be critical of the lack of organization in our demonstrations. While we have scored victories in some areas, in others we haven't! Some of our ceremonies are tiresome, and though I don't condone the frequent absence of some of our ambassadors, I understand why they might not want to come! Well, we must put a stop to this." (Sankara)

Sankara continues to enlighten us in the following manner: "We must even put a stop to certain kinds of praises that are poorly disguised and badly controlled expressions of 'feudal reflexes'. This song, for example, "Oh, CNR, Thomas Sankara may he forever be president" is not good. When you are president , you're president. When you are not, you are not. We must be clear, this is not a good song. At this rate, in one or two years we'll find ourselves in celebrations with groups that are much more trained in this and who may have nothing other than this to do.."

Sankara further adds that, "The CDRs are there to produce. Of course, if we need themes and slogans for our mobilizations, Okay! If we need images and symbols to understand the revolution, we need them, and we won't hesitate to use them. But we must not mistake the form of the revolution for its content."

The success of the revolution cannot be measured by the number of slogans, by the number of tenors and basses who chat our slogans (or, as one tends to observe on FB, by the number of 'one-liners or one or two words' slogans without giving any functional response to what the posts are about and at least either add or subtract ideas and the like). The revolution's success will be measured by other standards, by the level of production. We must produce, this is essential l(Whether it is writing articles and formulating progressive and revolutionary theories or agricultural or Industrial sectors by planting or building factories and so forth) This is why I welcome the slogan 'advanced for the million tons of grain' (or getting millions employed in newly built factories, and so on). (Thomas Sankara).

That is what we learn from Mao Tse Tung who further asserts that: "Weapons are an important factor in war, but not a decisive factor; it is the people, not things that are decisive. The contest of strength is not only a contest of military economic power, but also a contest of human power and morale. People necessarily wield military and economic power." Mao further cautions and advices that: "Be united, alert, earnest and lively. What really counts in the world of conscientiousness, and the Communist Party is most particular about being conscientious"
In the end, Mao states clearly that; 'We hail from all corners of the country and have "joined together" for a common revolutionary objective. ... Our cadres must show concern for every soldier, and "all People" in the revolutionary ranks must care for each other, love and help each other."

The weapon of theory is basic for any revolutionary endeavor. To lead and form and execute a revolution, Africans need people with abilities to mull over and wrap their heads around the common concerns of the people, invent or compose or design their approach from the feedback and the lessons, that any activist revolutionary will earn and learn from being involved in the application and manifestations of the actions need to carry-out a revolution, amongst and within and with their people. If Africans are to use FB as a vehicle to disperse and disseminate this revolution, let its form be informed and knowledgeable point of view and its use suit the needs and designs of African wishes. Respect of 'others' should be a prerequisite, and expression of one's views should be in-line with what people want, can do and accept and are willing to sacrifice their lives for its accomplishment. Hollering and ranting and being rude just to show that one is in a revolution, and also a revolutionary, or is about a revolution, won't cut it-and it is counter-revolutionary.

Stating and formulating revolutionary objectives on a social media like this, should not be done irresponsibly, because the web is global, and one does not want to alienate the international consensus, allies, support and approval. There are many people who know what the African Struggle in South Africa is all about, there is not need to make for Africans to think of themselves as a 'unique' people who are supposedly fighting a just war, but in the process alienating the rest of our allies, be they local or international. Mao addresses this point I am making above as follows:

"We must make a distinction between the enemy and ourselves, and we must not adopt an antagonistic stand towards comrades and treat them as we would treat the enemy. In speaking up, one must have an ardent desire to protect the cause of the people and raise their political consciousness, and there must be no ridiculing or attacking one's approach."

It is the duty of those who advocate revolution to be very well versed in social engineering and international affairs and the way the media or the web operates. Carelessness in action and or ignoring these fronts will needlessly lead to more confusion and no revolution, except the one be howled for on FB, and it will only end there, on FB.

Executing a revolution requires that the participant be well informed about their objectives and have a line of approach and action that is required and appreciated by those one wants to liberate, without alienating the other allies because of ignorance, carelessness and lack of discipline and leadership in understanding and knowing theory and using it as a weapon to emancipate the oppressed. This can only be developed through being active within the milieu one wants to work in, and this needs a revolutionary to learn how to be humble, compassionate and very sharp as to the in-and-outs of the struggle he/she is waging and with whom he/she is waging it for or together with.

Africans must dare themselves to invent, compose and formulate a much more better future with a human face. This is possible and doable. A clear and complete knowledge of ones history is key to national autonomy and freedom.

Law and Order Dr John Henrik Clarke

The Willie Lynch Letter And the Making of A Slave Paperback by Willie Lynch

Capitalism and Slavery [Paperback] Eric Williams

The Coming Of The Firm: Corporate Imperialism

Running Pell Mell Into Becoming Corporate CEOs

Corporate Firms and their History

Rodney had this to say about the European/African slave trade in Africa: "When one tries to measure the effect of European slave trading on the African continent, it is very essential to realize that one is measuring the effect of social violence rather than trade in any normal sense." The depopulation of the African communities, the decline of African agriculture and manufacturing industry, a general shift in social and state activity to slave raiding, kidnapping and fratricidal wars, which went on for over three hundred years, have had severe effects in the East, Central and Southern Africa.

"The havoc reigned upon these people, along with those in the Americas, Latin america and South America, things like conquest, plunder, forced labor, taxation, and forced specialization in an export monoculture, reversed the relative positions, and these peoples and their lands were progressively reduced to underdevelopment too. 20 million people were decimated in the Congo, physically, economically and culturally by the primitive exploitation of the Leopoldian "system." It is estimated that at least 10 million died as a result of this system in the twenty-year period between 1891 and 1911(Morel),more than the number of Jews killed in Hitler's concentration camps. The case of the Congo is but one amongst the many other such types of murderous extermination of a people, and in the meantime, these colonists made untold riches which have continued to be the foundation capital of the modern imperial corporate wealth."

From what Rodney is telling us about the cration of the Eorl economic system we now call Imperialistic Cpaitalism, we look now, below, at the emergence of the modern corporation

American and European Multi-corportionshave become the second government in America, or around the world and they utilize their influence to make sure that their interests are served to the maximum. For the corporations to maximize their profits, they have to have their feelers in all aspects of the society, and in the end take up power to further advance their interest, uninhabited, and unimpeded..

The emergence of monopoly capitalism in the petroleum, copper, and aluminum industries was marked by a number of characteristics common to all three. First, it was associated with rapid technological change in the last quarter of the nineteenth century in the capitalist countries, particularly. Such technological change had the effect of establishing these industries on a large scale; they produced essential inputs for the expanding industrial system and enjoyed a high rate of growth. Before this time, while oil, copper, and aluminum were produced, this production took place on a very small scale and at high cost, and was based largely on rich and easily worked deposits of basic material, such as surface seepages or oil and deposits of high-grade copper ores. Between the 1860s and and 1900, however, a revolution in production technology took place which made available supplies that were not only quantitatively greater but qualitatively different. The development of drilling techniques enabled subterranean oil to be brought to the surface; induced changes in the technology of refining and new methods of transport made it possible to move oil over long distances. Ores that contained so little copper that they were once considered worthless were brought into production by changes in the technology of mining and refining.Aluminum metal began to be produced in commercial qualities for the first time.

The changes on the supply side were partly the cause and partly the effect of changes on the demand side, in which technology also played an important part. In oil and aluminum, it was the break-throughs in the technology of production in the 1850s and 1880s, respectively, that stimulated new uses and the search for new markets; in copper, the rapid growth of demand for wire resulting from the emergence of the electricity industry in the 1880s sparked the drive to mine and teat low-grade ores on a large scale. Subsequently, technical changes on both the demand and the supply side interacted with cumulative effects. Thus, the automobile revolution in the early 1900s created explosive growth demands fro the products of all three industries, and this induced further technical changes on the supply side. Accompanying these changes was a revolution in economic organization which was no less significant.

By the early 1900s, the large number of small, single-stage, local firms in the petroleum and copper industries had been displaced by a small number of large, vertically integrated firms, national in scope and with oligopolistic market control. In aluminum, monopoly of metal production was a feature of the industry from the outset because of Alcoa's acquisition of the patent rights, and the company soon set about integrating itself backward into raw material extraction and forward into fabrication. It appears that the emergence of the integrated, oligopolistic firm was an inherent and possibly indispensable part of the revolution that took place in the scale of production and demand, in the level of technology, and in the quantity of capital utilized in production. With much more capital committed to production on a much larger scale, firms had to minimize the risks of investment and make sure that their facilities operated at full capacity by acquiring their own raw materials supplies and market outlets. All stages of production and marketing had to be brought as far as possible within the bounds of corporate control.

Those firms that got a head start because of strategic control over one stage of the industry or over production technology, because of capitalistic foresight and initiative, or because of a combination of all three, were able, in one way or another, were able to absorb the weaker and more vulnerable firms. This process continued until a small number of large firms faced one another, each with its own supplies of raw materials and its own market outlets. At that point, they discovered that their competitive struggles could be profitably diluted with collusive market control, that is, Cartel arrangements to maintain prices and profits by restraining output. What usually set the limit on the entry firms or provided the opportunities for new entrants was the scarcity or availability of the natural resources indispensable for profitable production. Thus, the discovery of new copper deposits in Montana in 1880s provided the basis for the new Anaconda company to break the control of the Lake Michigan producing pool; the discovery of the Texas oil fields at the turn of the century made it possible for the Texas Company and Gulf Oil to challenge the hegemony of Standard Oil. In contrast, Alcoa's control of bauxite deposits and hydroelectric resources helped effectively to prevent the entry of new companies into the United States industry until after World War II, when Jamaican deposits began to be used by Reynolds and Kaiser.

The transnational corporation embodies not only a pattern of economic relationships but also a pattern of domination, as expressed by the power relations within it. Raw materials operations have to be subjected to the absolute control of the patent firm, for they are the basis upon which rests the whole edifice of production and marketing, and hence of capital accumulation. The transnational corporation not only has tremendous resources of finance and technology, it also has an enormous flexibility growing out of the fact that its operations are based in a large number of countries. Such flexibility and the integrated nature of its operations give it a wide range of options to shift accounting profits, and ultimately new investment and even existing production facilities, from one country to another. Outsourcing of jobs from America to other countries follows this model.

Furthermore, the transnational corporation normally enjoys a close relationship with the government of its home country - which means that the center country's government will bring pressure to bear on the peripheral government in the interests of the firm. This can mean, in turn, that the government in the peripheral country will pressure the labor force in the interest of the local subsidiary of the corporation." In many cases, these subsidiaries become a government of the country wherein they are extracting or stealing raw materials, subverting locally elected governments, and this is the Corporate Imperial way.

In the case of the Koch Brothers, they are now attempting to take over the American government in a brazen act to grab power, and along with other corporations, try to take over power("reclaiming the country-taking it back"), for as we can now see, courtesy of the 2010 election, that their actions and solutions offer an even much more sinister intent. Which we still have to talk about in the case of South Africa which is really function as a siamese twin of the American and European economies, politics and ethics... If you understand the history of the firms above,it certainly is one and the same as the economy, politics and policies that are emasculating us a nation in Mzantsi.

I thought and reckoned that a short history on the corporation's creation and build-up would do to inform us as to what this is all about that we see today and want to become CEO's of. If you do not know anything, it might kill you... This history dovetails clearly with what Water Rodney has told us a bit about the creation of wealth, which I pick up as to the present product of that welath: the Corporation- which is a government in and of itself and ends up governing and controlling those countries in which they have their capital investment.

Rbg-dr. Amos Wilson on Black Economics 1 of 2

The Autobiography of Malcolm X: As Told to Alex Haley Paperback by Malcolm X

Struggle

The Struggle For African's Revolution Cannot Be Achieved Through jaundiced and Jingoistic Prattles.

I know for a fact that our peoples aphorisms are relevant when they say:
"The Path Going Forward is Asked from those Who Went Before, or ahead". (A loose translation of "Tsela e botswa ho ba pele/kapa bao ba ileng ba e tsamaya".

A Short Note to Africans People


"We are not going to use this platform to rail against imperialism. An African saying very common in our country says: "When your house is burning, it's of no use beating the tom-toms. ... For us, the best or worst shout against imperialism, whatever its form, is to take up arms and fight. This is what we are doing, and this is what we will go on doing until all foreign domination of our African homelands has been totally dominated.

Our agenda includes subjects whose meaning and importance are beyond question and which show a fundamental preoccupation with 'struggle'. We note, however, that one form of struggle which we consider to be fundamental ... is the 'struggle against our own weaknesses'. Our experience has shown us that in the general framework of daily struggle, this battle against ourselves-no matter what difficulties the enemy may create-is the most difficult of all, whether for the present or the future of our peoples. This battle is the expression of the internal contradictions in the economic, social, cultural (and therefore, historical) reality of each of our countries. We are convinced that any rational or social revolution which is not based on knowledge of this fundamental reality runs grave risk of being condemned to failure.

However, we must recognize that we ourselves and the other liberation movements in general (referring here above all to the African experience) have not managed to pay sufficient attention to this important problem in our struggle.
The ideological deficiency, not to say the total lack of ideology, within the national liberation movements-which is basically due to ignorance of the 'historical reality' which these movements claim to transform-constitutes one to the greatest weaknesses of the African struggle against imperialism, if not the greatest weakness of all.... A full discussion of this subject could be useful to ma subject could be useful, and would enable the [movement] to make a valuable contribution toward strengthening the present and future actions of national liberation. This would be a concrete way of helping these movements, and in my opinion, no less important than political support or financial assistance for arms and suchlike.
It is with the intention of making a contribution, however modest, to this debate that I present here my opinion of "the foundations and objectives of national liberation in relation to the social structure."

Our refusal, based as it is on concrete knowledge of the socio-economic reality of our countries, and on the analysis of the process of development of this phenomenon of class, leads us to conclude that if class struggle is the motive force of history, it is so only in a specific historical period (I have addressed this point somewhat in my earlier post about history). It is not difficult to see that this factor in the history of each human group is the "mode of production"-the level of productive forces and the pattern of ownership-characteristic of that group. ... It therefore seems correct to conclude that the level of productive forces, the essential determining element in the content and form of class struggle, is the true and permanent motive force of history.

Thus, we see that African peoples have their own history regardless of the stage of their economic development. When they were subjected to imperialist domination, the historical process of each of our peoples (or of the human groups of which they are composed) was subjected to the violent action of an external factor: in this case, in the forms of Colonization, Corporate Imperialism and Corporate Military Industrial complexes. This action-the impact of imperialism on our societies-could not fail to influence the process of development of the productive forces in our countries and the social structures of our countries, as well as the content and form of our national liberation struggles.

But we also see that in the historical context of the development of these struggles, and that African peoples have the concrete possibility of going from their present situation of exploitation and underdevelopment, to a new stage of their historical process which can lead them to a higher from of economic, social and cultural existence and power.

Amilcar Cabral.

Dr. Amos Wilson: Love & Afrikan [Black] Relationships [1985]

Re-Inventing Africa: Matriarchy, Religion and Culture Paperback by Ifi Amadiume

African Matriarchy

Diop on African Matriarchy in African Culture:

Having listened to Clarke above in his lecture about "Black Women In History" We learn and read from Diop that:

"The Islamization of West Africa began with the Almoravidia movement in the tenth century. I can be emphasized that it introduced a sort of dividing line in the evolution of religious consciousness, first of the princes, and as a result, among the people. The traditional religion withered away little by little under the influence of Islam, as did the mores and customs. This is how the patrilineal regime, gradually and progressively became substituted for the matrilineal regime, from the tenth century onwards. The exterior reasons which led to this change can thus be grasped.

"In West Africa, the adoption of the father's name for the children seems to stem rom this same Arabic influence; as a matter of fact, we have just learnt fro Ibn Batouta that in 1253, children took the name of their maternal uncle, that is to say, their mother's brother. The children did indeed take the name of a man, but the regime was purely matrilineal; it only ceased to be so from the time when, according to Islamic custom, the name of the father was substituted for that of the uncle.

"It is important to note that, beginning with the same period, detribalization was an accomplished fact in West Africa; this is proved by the possibility of an individual bearing his own family name and not the name of a clan. In regions of the continent which are not detribalized, individuals have only a first name; when their proper name is asked for, they reply that they belong to such a totemic clan, whose name can only be borne collectively. It is only when the members of the clan dispersed that they could retain as individuals, in memory of the 'ancient' community, the name of the clan, which could them become their own family name.

"It is, however, necessary to stress a particular fashion of naming a child which seems to proceed from a dualist conception of social life. To the boy's name is added that of the mother and to the daughter's name that of the father; for instance: Cheik Fathma means the son of Fatma, Magatte Massamba-Sassoun is the daughter of Massamba-assoun. It is certain that this does not come from Arabic Influence.

"African Matriarchy existed on a continent-wide scale:

"The bearing of a son toward his mother among the Swazi (Who live in southern Africa) is a combination of deference and affection. To him, swearing, undressing, or conducting himself in an immodest manner in her presence, brings about, it is believed, direct punishment by ancestors; he will also be publicly rebuked and can be forced by the family council to pay a fine. It is expected that his mother will scold him, should he neglect his duties as a son, a husband or a father, and he must not reply to her angrily. The accent is always on the mother proper 'the mother who bore me'. Her hut is keftu - our house."

Consanguinity among the Tswana, who live in Botswana, next to South Africa, is also matrilineal:

"The maternal relatives are not involved as a rule in the situations we have just described. they cannot be rivals in property or social position and most often 'although this is not absolutely general'. They belong to another community in the vicinity. They are, in consequence, well-known to be more affectionate and devoted than the agnates. The children, when they are small, are often sent for some time to the home of their mother's relatives, who later on encourage them to come frequently to visit them. There, a warm reception and generous hospitality are reserved for them and they profit from numerous advantages. A child has a place in the home of his mother's kin, say the proverb. A maternal Uncle allied to him must, in particular, be consulted in every case, especially concerning the children of his sister; his opinion is so important that sometimes at the moment when a marriage is being arranged, his veto can be decisive... It is from his maternal uncle, more perhaps than from any other person, that a man expects disinterested advice and assistance in case of need... The relatives and sisters of the mother are commonly recognized as being more kindly and more indulgent that those of the father.

"Among the Ashanti of Ghana, descent is also matrilineal.

"The Ashanti consider the bond between mother ad child as the keystone of all social relations. They consider it as a moral relationship which is absolutely binding. An Ashanti woman will not stint in the work she does or the sacrifices she makes for her children. It is specially to feed, clothe and educate them today, that she works so hard, annoys her husband and jealously watches her bother, to make sure that he carries out faithfully his duties as the child's legal guardian. No demand is too exaggerated for a mother to meet. Although she shrinks from inflicting punishment and never disowns her child, an Ashanti mother requires from her children both obedience and affectionate respect... To show disrespect to a mother is equivalent to committing sacrilege.

"Matriarchy also governs the social organization of the 'Bantu' of Central Africa.

"Most of the 'Bantu people of Central Africa determine descent in the matrilineal rather than in the patrilineal line, and many of them practice among themselves a certain form of what is generally known under the name of matrilocal marriage. Indeed, it is this matrilineal character of the family organization which distinguishes them so clearly from the 'Bantu' of Eastern Southern Africa, and it is for this reason that the territory stretching from the West and Center of the Belgian Congo to the North-East of Northern Rhodesia(Zimbabwe) and the mountains of Nyasaland is sometimes know as the "matrilineal belt".

Diop continues:

"It is clear from this statement that the matriarchal regime existed generally in Africa, in ancient times as well as at the present day, and that tis cultural feature does not result from an ignorance of the role of the father in the conception of the child. The phallic cult, which is a corollary of the agrarian regime (raised stones, the obelisks of Egypt, the temples of India, and phallic structure of stone in South Africa along with the buildings and pyramids) is ample proof of this; it shows that at the time when ancient humanity chose the system of matrilineal descent, it knew the role of the father in fecundaton. In none of the system described in the Southern cradle is patrilineal consanguinity systematically neglected,

"On the contrary, social conduct regarding patrilineal relatives is stricter than that regarding matrilineal relatives. With the latter, one behaves freely and easily without social hypocrisy; it is different with the former, since appearances must always be safeguarded. A maternal brother or half-brother can be left on the battlefield, but never a paternal half-brother, although he is less loved than the former, and he is more distant from him. He is a social rival, who must be outdone or at least equalled in everything, to do honor, within the bounds of polygamy, to the 'dwelling' of his mother, that is to say, to his line, his motherland."

"What is important to us today is not the legacy of warrior queens, but a thorough analysis of the primary system of social organization around an economically self-sufficient or self-supporting matricentric cultural unit and a gender free or flexible gender linguistic system, which is the legacy of African Matriarchy. We need to understand its associated goddess-foussed religions and culture which helped women organize effectively to fight the subordinating and controlling forces of patriarchy, thereby achieving a kind of system of checks and balances.

"This is basically so-called monotheistic and abstract religions of Islam and Christianity ruling Africa today subverted and continue to attack. The fundamental question to those proposing these religions as a possible means of achieving a pan-African unity or federation is this: are these religions able to accept and accommodate our goddesses and matriarchy, that is, African women's true primordial cultures in the present politics, of primordialism, manipulated by nationalists and fundamentalists?

Hinterland Africa proper which had such structures which favored the rule of goddesses, queens, etc., is indeed still present with us today. But, these systems are facing erosion, as elite African men manipulate the new and borrowed patriarchies to forge a most formidable 'masculine imperialism', yet unknown in our history.(Diop)

Somewhere else Diop observes: "Matriarchy is not an absolute and cynical triumph of woman over man; it is a harmonious dualism, an association accepted by both sexes, the better to build a sedentary society where each and every one could fully develop by following the activity best suited to his/her physiological nature. A matriarchal regime, far from being imposed on man by circumstances independent of his will, is affected and defended by him." As Diop says correctly of militant or military female contingents in Africa, 'the hatred of men is foreign to them and they posses the consciousness of being 'soldiers' struggling for the liberation of their country.'
Because Diop took on the fundamental issue of matriarchy from an Afrocentric perspective and interest, as opposed to a compromised struggle for women's rights in patriarchal systems, what scholar will match the feminism of Cheik Anta Diop? For him, matriarchy is an 'ensemble of institutions favorable to womanhood and to mankind in general. As he said, male controlled social science has only seen in this 'dangerous freedom which is almost diabolical'. One wonders why western matriarchy theorists do not cite the work of Cheik Anta Diop?

The rage against Diop by White scholars and Western self-intere has not abated. If anything, it is very often these days, parroted by a particular class of Africans themselves, who are still under their tutelage, supervision and control, and they are dedicated copycats. As for African men, they feel contended to cite only those aspects of the work of the great thinker which serve their purpose, especially reclaiming of ancient Egyptian civilization. The fundamental theses of his work, which rests on African Matriarchy, is the least given importance and applied. This is so true, because for women, they would do better if they are talking about feminism, they could do well by studying Diop's work on matriarchy, a severely ignored and underrated part of his works

In the most recent findings in Western search for human racial origins, a racist invention and concern of the West alone, Diop is vindicated time and time again as the the primary role of the African mother, whether in the bequeathing of the gene or language to the human race continues to be 'very scientifically proved'. But racist appropriation continue, even in this era of deconstruction - if these youngest of our children do not call humanity's African mother Lucy, they call her Eve! So, we see again in this, the appropriation of the nineteenth century, to even scientists, it is unthinkable that the fossil of our African mother, found on the African continent, should retain an African name! This crystalizes and symbolizes the nature of the relationship of European civilization with that of Africa. This structure of appropriation can be found in every other field of relations.

Diop had prayed, "may his work contribute to the strengthening of the feelings of goodwill which have united Africans from one end of the continent to the other and this show our organic cultural unity." He made it imperative that a full knowledge of lessons must be learnt from the past in order to 'keep one's consciousness the feeling of historical continuity essential to the consolidation of a multinational state." Like Diop, concerning African history knowledge and teaching history of colonialism, African intellectuals,if they are to be free from self-negation, must deconstruct, invalidate and reconstruct, rewrite, compose and form their history in their own image, African perspective, own, control and shape it to suit themselves as they see fit..

In this project of reconstruction, a gender and class aware social history is a priority. The racist term anthropology, which really should have been social history, must be banned altogether. We must adopt and elaborate the historiography of Cheik Anta Diop, using his multidisciplinary approach to write an African social history and enforce the teaching of [African] social history in our curriculum. Present-day African scholarship only knows the chronological history of Kings, Queens and conquest. Since in our schools and colleges, there is no [Africa]social history, nor grassroots history from the bottom and the history of African indigenous social institutions, how then can Africans begin to build an Afrocentric history and unity without this knowledge? As Diop said, "let the general commitment of intellectual activism lead to the liquidation of all colonial systems of imperialism." We also learn About matriarchy from the following quote:

Leonard Cottrell gives this information about the status of women during Cleopatra's time. To understand Cleopatra's story in great detail, it is necessary to know something about the culture and customs of her time in history:

"The high status which respectable" women enjoyed in Ancient Egypt arose i part from the matriarchal system, which on the family was based. All landed property descended in the female line from mother to daughter. When a man married an heiress, he enjoyed her property only as long as his wife lived. On her death, it passed on to her daughter and her daughter's husband. This practice was never more strictly observed than in the Royal family, which explains why so many of the Pharaohs married their sisters, or even their infant daughters.

"Often these marriages were purely formal affairs. Margaret Murray in "The splendor That Was Egypt" says: The marriage laws of Ancient Egypt were never formulated and knowledge of them can be obtained only by working out the marriages and genealogies. It then became evident that a Pharaoh safeguard himself from abdication by marrying every heiress without any regard to consanguinity, so that it the chief heiress died, he was already married to the next in succession and thus retained the sovereignty ... the throne went strictly in the female line. The great wife of the King was the heiress; by the right of marriage with her, the King came to the throne. The King's birth was not important. He might be of any rank, but if he married the Queen, he at one became King; the Queen was Queen by right of birth, the King by right of marriage."

As long as there are African men and women in this world and as long as the West persists in its history of patriarchy, racism and imperialism, there remains then a desperate and dire need to reconstruct African culture and history from an African Centered Perspective along with the edification of matriarchy as part of the protocol and prerequisite towards rebuilding and fashioning contemporary African histories, cultures and societies anew.

The Pan-African historian John Henrik Clarke: the leadership within the Black community

Urban Poverty and Party Populism in African Democracies Hardcover by Dr Danielle Resnick

Poor and Decrepit African Leadership and Mass Empowerment

On Erudition Of African Mass Potential Leadership

There is a pervasive sense of foreboding and impending doom among Africans who let themselves look reality "dead in the face". In the face of the tremendous deterioration of their quality of life: mounting unemployment, increasing poverty, crime, moral degradation; devastating miseducation and the even more devastating lack of education; overwhelming drug addiction and insensate violence, homicide, terror, prostitution, disease and corruption. In the face of children having children, social incivility, a youth culture whose raucous music speaks of nihilism, rape, robbery and murder. The degradation and venal hatred of Black(African) women, of everything Black(African); in the face of unfulfilled longings for the satisfaction of basic needs in the midst of the "affluent" - the need for food, for physical safety and security, for belonging, love, acceptance, higher self-esteem. knowledge and understanding, freedom and autonomy,, achievement, creativity and self-realization; in the face of all these unfulfilled dreams and wishes, the African community in ever-rising crescendos emits a heart-rendering cry for new leadership. Even the old leaders are calling for new leadership. The persistent call for leadership in the Black(African) community is a call for help, a call for a set of leading persons, organizations and ideas that can provide the community with a sense of unity, definition, direction, power, with a developmental plan and the wherewithal to realize its abundant human potential in their land endowed with enormous wealth.

The most persistent complaints the community makes concerning it current leadership are that they have either been co-opted by the past apartheid White ruling regime; are outdated in terms of values, goals and techniques; are not truly and deeply committed to the welfare of the people; are self-centered, self serving, egocentric, 'corrupt"; out of touch with the current and future realities; timid and cannot recognize the needs of the people or articulate those needs in ways which move the people toward their satisfaction and attainment; are intellectually inept and are not effectively educating the masses and inspiring them to realize the enormous power which lies dormant within themselves; are co-opted and put into strategic position by the ANC-led government even if they had been rejected by the communities and the African voting polity.

I won't debate or critically go into nor evaluate these complaints, for now. I believe that even if the contemporary Black(African) leadership accurately gauged and articulated the needs of African people and their communities, this would not necessarily empower the masses. The generation of social power requires appropriate 'organization', 'tactics' and 'strategies' - and a unifying vision or sense of mission-which I have partially addressed above. It requires a guiding set of ideas or an ideology whose attempted realization defines the social attitudes, relations and institutions which together can empower a people. A people are empowered or disempowered by the guiding ideologies of their leaders to whom they pledge allegiance. Though leaders recognize the needs of their followers an are at one with them in terms of their own needs, their choice of inappropriate social-political ideologies and goals may bring both themselves and their followers to despair. This is the kind of poor, weak and tired leadership that the poor masses have to deal and contend with.

This then means that as Africans are evolving in our understanding of their decrepit situation, we need to shine a brighter light on the problems that have been listed above and find out why is it so. It is here in this article I turn to Sankara for a much more sober and focused laser-like analysis to these problems and what he has to say about it which will help in making African people's lack of understanding of these issues much more clearer, and these poor people can mull on them and think them through much more clearly in a speech he gave on March 26, 1983....

Sankara runs the revolutionary rap thus:

"Who are these enemies of the people?
They are to be found here at home and abroad. At this very moment the are trembling, but you must expose them. You must drive them back into their holes. The enemies of the people are here inside the country are all those who have illicitly taken advantage of their social position and their place in the bureaucracy to enrich themselves. By means of bribery,maneuvers, and forged documents they have become shareholders in different companies. They are now involved in financing business and obtaining approval for this or that enterprise - in the guise of helping Upper Volta. These are the enemies of the people. They must be exposed. This section of the bourgeoisie must be fought against, and we will fight against it.

"Who are the enemies of the people? They are the men in politics who travel through the countryside exclusively at election time. These politicians are convinced that only they can make our country work. These enemies of the people must be exposed and combated. We will combat them with you. The enemies of are likewise those who keep us in ignorance. Under the over of spiritual guidance and tradition, they exploit the people instead of serving their real spiritual needs and their real social interests. they must be fought against and we will fight them.

"The enemies of the people are also beyond our borders. Their base is among unpatriotic people here in our midst at every level of our society - civilian and military men, men and women, old and young, in town and country alike. These enemies from abroad - neocolonialism - are among us. From its base base among these stateless men, those who have rejected their homeland,who have, in fact rejected their own people(the people Of Upper Volta (Mzantsi?), this enemy abroad is organizing a series of attacks. First will come the none-violent and the the violent stage. At this stage we are living through the non-violent stage [in the case of present-day South Africa, violence has become the norm]. This is the enemy abroad - imperialism, neo-colonialism - is attempting to sow confusion in the minds of the Voltaic people. According to their newspapers,radios,and television, Upper Volta is all fire and blood.

"You see, imperialism is wrong. But Imperialism is a bad student. Even though its been defeated,though it's been sent out of the classroom, it comes back again. It's a bad student. Imperialism never draws lessons from its failures. Its down in South Africa cutting African throats - just because Africans there are thinking about freedom, as you are today.

Imperialism is everywhere, making us think like it, submit to it, and go along with its maneuvers by spreading it culture (cultural Imperialism), far and wide with the help of misinformation and other shenanigans. We must bar the road to this imperialism. As I said,it will proceed to a violent stage. It is imperialism that landed troops in certain countries we know. Imperialism armed those who are killing our brothers in South Africa. Imperialism again is the assassin of the Lumumbas, Cabrals, Kwame Nkumahs, Machels..."

Need I say more. All I can add at this point is that practical application is needed, after writing such a pieces about ideas of "Leadership' and What its made of and is doing at present, will be added on. The readers can make up their own mind about they have read here- the fact this remains an ongoing research project from which we will be posting ideas that are practical and helpful for Africans of South africa will be pursued doggedly. The piece above gives and intelligent view of the mass mind in a simple form, the second part are the ideas of Sankara reinforcing the call for action, practice and tactics from an African collective perspective.

The next post will put all these in a digestible context for all to use. We need to talk about these issue of leadership so as to sharpen our Critique and Anti-Critique of it... It's strange how power, society and leadership are still an on going conversation in the African communities on the Continent and in the Diaspora, and Sankara, in 1983, captured its essence and was evolving ideas how to really deal with it. What African South africans can do with this material is to make sure they read it, and pass it on to as many people as people as possible-and help making it a reality.

An updated and educated masses is the most feared weapon by imperialism. The task of Africans in South Africa today is to see to it that they educate and inform the masses- This is the leader Africans should be looking forward and toward in the future tactics, strategies and social engineering using(As Mao noted above), implanting and embedding new formations, attitudes and ways of doing for the poor like has never been done before.. I will be adding to this topic at length in the near future....

Dr. Amos Wilson Total War

J.A. Rogers: World's Great Men of Color, Volume I:

The Essentials of the Nguni/Bakone Cultures, Traditions, Customs and Practices

We must always Turn To Ourselves; Our Writers; Our Literature

What Kind Of Culture, Custom, Tradition and Practices Were Under Siege?

The Cultures, Customs, Traditions, Histories, Practices, Sacred Rites, Languages and Traditional Dress of Africans have been experiencing a sustained and serious Cultural War Total Onslaught from the colonizers since their landing in the Cape in the 1600s. We have learned from this Hub how the survivors of the Stavinesse gave accounts of the nature, condition, and reality of the culture of the Zulus they came across after wrecking their sip in the Port of Natal in the 11th century. I will only give an example of one culture of the 11 (eleven)people of South Africa just to give some concrete manifestation of this culture I have been talking about above.

Above I was discussing the Diop Perspective and historical prognosis of the regime of Matriarchy, we learnt that the lineage of families and the bearing of the last name was with that of the side of the mother, and the role of the maternal uncle in having his last name be the name of his sister children, not the father-and the cultural and tradition and customary reasons for such rules and laws.

In spite and despite the claims of the colonizers writing about the history of African as being backward and inconsequential, the present-day Africans are the generation that should now be laying ground and writing a corrected history of Africans from an African people's perspective. I assert in this Hub that African societies were not dysfunctional, despite what the European historians say or write about Africans and their history. One thing certain, there was, and there exists remnants of this culture today, attest to the fact that African society in South Africa was well-organized and functioning just like any other human culture around the world from antiquity to the present-and will still functioning in the future, beyond the 21st century. Biko has pointed out to the fact that African culture in South Africa has taken a huge bashing, but its original outlines and essentials remain intact to date. In other instances it has been altered, has morphed or changed into something else that meets and fits the lives and existential realities of Africans in different given times in their history and existence under segregation, separate development and Apartheid, and now, under the gendarme ANC-led government, in South Africa today.

"Africans think and do certain things in a different way," so says Prof Clarke. Africans live in a "We" Society(the totality, collectiveness of the whole society, whilst Africans live from the meanness of the individual-created world of Africa. The folklore and folktales of Africa are not told and put down for individuals, but for the totality of Africa. "If you do not know where you going, the road will take you there", said by an African told by Dr.Clarke. The video below, the coming of the Europeans, to the world, was disastrous. Yet the assumption is that his coming was the coming of the light. Yet he brought no civilization or light in the world.. this all can be heard in its entirety in the tape below, because Clarke says they came as the 'civilizer' and as 'conquerer'.

Now, what Clarke is saying is that as Africans we should know these truths and what they forebode to African culture. The culture of the Basotho of South Africa are more the same, like and one with the other cultures of the other 10 other peoples of South Africa, which I had begun to cover in my Hub, "South African Culture, Customs and Practices Write Large_ Re-Morphed Cultural Renaissance against Dysfunctional Existence". The hub I have just mentioned is still a work(but published) in progress and with still more material to be added to it. In it I discuss the Culture, Tradition, Custom, Languages, Sacred Rites and Practices of the Basotho, in their own language(with English interpretations)

What Clarke is saying in the paragraph above remains true to this day. It is at this juncture that we begin to look at this supposedly non-existence of the culture of Africans of South Africa. Before I talk about the Culture, customs, traditions and practices of the Basothos, I would point the reader to look up my article called "South African Music & Dance's Struggle Against Culture Wars: A View Of The Music and Dance Of Africans of South Africa." These two Hubs I have mentioned, tie-in and dovetail well with this section and the Whole Hub in an effort to raise the importance and power of the culture, customs, traditions, sacred rites, music, dances and practices of Africans of South Africa to the human and World History levels.

A Brief Look At the Culture, Customs, Traditions, Practices, Sacred Rites of the Basotho


We now llok briefly and summarilly at the the Customs, Traditions, Rites and Practices of the Basotho people:

The Nguni people of South Africa had an organized system of life guided by their ancient customs,traditions, customs, sacred rites and their practices from time immemorial.They had practices, custom and traditions along with customs of Lenyalo(Marriage; they types of cows for what is now know as lobla(and thesehad names like, Dikgomo tsa pehelano(sort of loosley, lay-bye), Digomo tsa bohadi(Cows for the brides' people), and the cows which are the first offering prior to those requested by the bridesmaid people((Kgomo tsa Selelekela); The behavior and comportment of the bridegroom at the bridesmaid people((Mokgwenyana Bohweng); Melao ya dingwetsi(Laws for the bridesmaids; the sacred customary rites for newborns(Dikanelo tsa Masea) and so forth;

The had laws customs and traditions for the boys who go to the school of custom for circumcision(, and for girls(Lebollo la Bashemane le Banana); the were traditional healing and prayers for the deadly sick(Bababi Le Lefu); the were customary rules and regulations for relations between a person and his elderly people(as in they boy and his elders; the reltions ofthe nephew and his uncle); special planting and harvesting of wheat and grain for a special different seasons.

There was also, Dipheko, Ho Upa,jwalo-jwalo(Sickness and other maladies, etc.); Tsa Dinyopa(Those who cannot bear children);the were ways and customs for those Women who bear girls only(Basadi ba belehang Banana feela), there were traditional cures and customary, traditional sacred rites associated with that. Laws, rules and customs of taking care of bodily dirt(Ditsila tsa mmele); how to exhchange gifts and other special things; the panting fileds and the reaping of the corn, and wheat; how and why is home -made beer done-for what and which occassions; the laws governing Kings(Melao ya Marena); community and personal wealth(Cows, their skins; different trades and skills; iron works; vows and names of the elderly old people; the Basotho's Wealth and accrual thereof-(Leruo La Basotho Le mesebetsi e meng).

Rules and laws governing War(Ntwa[War]

We also have "Maeto": Kamohelo ya baeti (How to treat visitors); what to do and how to behave when one traveller meets another traveler in the way/road or their travels); Dithoko, Metjeko, Dipapadi (Praises and Poems, Dances and Games); Dipapadi Tsa Bana(Children's Games); and the ways of the shepherds and herd boys.

This is a shortened and truncated version of a very interesting diverse culture, and each category can be broken into so many pieces and explains a lot that this culture has set for itself and its people One can read more about this in my Hub titled: "South African Culture, Customs and Practices Writ Large: Re-Morphed Cultural Renaissance Against Dysfunctional Existence.". This is a culture that the colonists have said does not exist, is backwards and Barbaric; also, they painted it as inconsequential.

But if one were to look much deeper into it, one begins to see that this was a very organized and vibrant culture that had its own intricacies and ways of being without any influence form anything European. The coming of the European, in their belligerency and aggression tried all they could to wipe off the culture from the face of the earth, but if the reader checked out the hubs I mentioned above, one would see that it is still existing and going on strong, besides the vicissitude of the harsh cultural wars of attrition foisted upon it.The reader can go back to the top and re-watch Dr. John Hendrik Clarke's "The Necessity of returning To African Customs" in this Hub.

Debate: Kwame Ture vs Molefi Asante - Africa And The Future

Dr. Ben Jochannan: Black Man of the Nile Paperback

African History Was Never Unimportant-Even If Europeans Pretended It Was Underdeveloped And Backward

In adding and elaborating up to the Video above about the lecture of African resistance, I will conclude the entry above about Customs, traditions and customs of Africa, that, knowing them well is a path towards resistance for African people. If you know something, and it is the truth, it will never change. This is emphasized in many ways by Clarke as I will cite him below wherein he writes:

"An african World Revolution, might sometime sound like a fantasy, but please bear in min that sometimes the fantasy of today is tomorrow's reality. In addition to a need for a total reconsideration of Pan-Africanism, a cultural revolution is needed within the whole of the African world. The most important aspect of this revolution will occur within the geography of the continent of Africa, which is almost 12 million square miles, endowed by nature with some of the greatest mineral wealth in all the world.

"I believe the technical and scientific aspects of this revolution will begin with Africans living outside of Africa who have been exposed, through education, to the kind of technological education that Africa needs in order to renew its old societies and make them workable within the modern world. It is important for us to learn who our friends are and who our enemies are and how to make the best use of both of them. The principal concepts of nation structure, nation formation, and nation building have been taken away from us as well."(Sankara had as much to say about this 'enemy' in the midst of African people, so did Mao, who I cited above)What I have tried to to do in giving the outlines of the culture of the Basotho, which too has been under siege, by the Apartheid cultural War which sowed seeds of confusion and amnesia amongst the Africans, that most have now forgotten or dismissed, as I have noted above in this Hub. What I have given as the Basotho culture, often dismissed as irrelevant, not modern, and does not function nor fit in the times we live in today. But Clarke cautions and teaches us that:

"The ability to examine our adversaries, to move among them, and still to advance while learning something of their technique has also been taken away from us. We have been rather naive in our interaction with people and we have overlooked too many items in relationship to our freedom. We have not developed a technique for dealing with our own traitors. But if we cannot do anything else, we can at least isolate them."

So that, in order for us to move the writing of our history by ourselves, we must delineate some facts about Africans and their meeting with Europeans as to what happened in that interaction, and why did it happen.

"When the Europeans discovered the African presence in the world for the second time, the first time being during the Greco-Roman period, their attitude toward African people had changed. to understanding this change, we must deal with the reshaping of the European mind in the years between 1400 and 1600. In their religious and political wars many Europeans lost all sentimental attachment to themselves.

"They had emerged from the Middle Ages people poor, land poor, and resource poor. A large number of the population had been lost to plagues and famines, and the Crusades had awakened Europe t the world beyond its shores and the many creature comforts that had not at that time reached Europe. They were beginning to regain the lost concept of Longitude and Latitude and re-discovering Maritime skills mainly from the information preserved by Africans and Arabs at the University of Salamanca in SpainKnow as the Moors- of which I wrote a Hub about the Moors I titled: "The History And The Age of The Moors In Spain: How the Moors Civilized Europe - The History Of Africa."

"The best of this information had come to them form China, the leading Maritime nation of that day. Europeans, were also, at that time, searching for a route to mainland Asia in order to obtain the sweets and spices, some legendary, some real, that they needed for the European food of that day, which was often unpalatable.

"In a recent paper Professor Keith E. Baird calls attention to how and why Africa was lost from the respectful commentary of history. Until quite recently, it was rather generally assumed, even among well-educated persons in the West, that the continent of Africa was a great expanse of land, mostly jungle, inhabited by savages and fierce beasts. It was unthought of that great civilizations could have been born in might and wisdom over vast empires.

"It is true that there were some notions current about the cultural achievement of Egypt, but Egypt was conceived as a European land rather than as a country of Africa. Even if one takes a look at an Atlas or Globe, both showed Egypt to be in Africa. Then popular thought immediately saw in the Sahara desert a formidable barrier and a convenient division of Africa into two parts: one, north of the Sahara, was inhabited by a European-like people of 'high culture and noble history'; the other, south of the Sahara, was inhabited by a 'dark-skinned people who had no culture, and were incapable of having done anything in their dark and distant past that could be dignified by the designation of 'history'." Such ideas, of course, are far from the truth, and unfortunately, still persist in one form or another in the popular mind.

"The concept of "darkest Africa" refers to the comparative ignorance of Europeans regarding that continent and its people over the last four centuries. Jonathan swift made a sharp but witty comment on his fellow Europeans' lack of knowledge of Africa when he wrote"

Geographers in Africa Maps

With Savage pictures fill their gaps,

And o'er uninhabitable downs

Paint elephants instead of towns.

"There is another reason why the people of Africa, with the notable exclusion of Egypt, were depicted as uncivilized and lacking in cultural attainments. A number of pious people in Europe would have been struck in horror if they knew of the cruel and blood acts of their country men in the course of the inhuman slave-trade. Ruthless European adventurers promoted the hunting down of men, women and children like beasts, and the destruction of complete villages in order to capture the inhabitants and sell them like cattle. Therefore, slave traders would invent fantastic tales of savagery about the Africans so that their capture and their transportation to labor on the plantations of the Americans would appear to be acts of Christian concern and high minded enlightenment."

Clarke cites Richard B. Moore who who wrote:

"The significance of African history is shown, though not overtly, in the very effort to deny anything worthy of the name of history to Africa and the African peoples. This widespread, and well nigh successful endeavor, maintained through some five centuries, to erase African history from the general record, is a fact which of itself should be quite conclusive to thinking and open minds. for it is logical and apparent that no such undertaking would ever have been carried on, and at such length, in order to obscure and to bury what is actually of little or not significance."

Moore adds:

"The prime significance of African history become still more manifest when it is realized that this deliberate denial of African history arose out of the European expansion and invasion of Africa which began in the middle of the fifteenth century. The compulsion was thereby felt to attempt to justify such colonialist conquest, domination, enslavement, and plunder. Hence, this brash denial of history and culture to Africa, and, indeed, even human qualities and capacity for "civilization" to the indigenous people of Africa".

If we understand Clarke well, there was a conscious effort to delete and obfuscate the historical memory of Africans from the mid-fifteenth century up to today, in the age of the Web and Internet, where posts are made to the same effect of trying to deny and distort African history: to deny Africans their cultural history and humanity. It is how to the present latter-day generation of historians will do to put the record straight, tread on the footsteps of the Master Teachers, and begin to compose, rework, re-write and re-invent African History as we move forward into the 21st century.

Global White Supremacy Pt 2 Of 2 - Dr. John Henrik Clarke, Gary Bird & Alton Maddox

Marcus Garvey and the Vision of Africa Paperback by John Henrik Clarke

Professor John Hendrik Clarke: African History Lesson


African History In African Perspective

This Hub is about the writings and lectures of Prof. John Hendrik Clarke. It is also an experiment in writing African history of South African a the history of Africa(although not much was really covered on the history of the whole of Africa), but it was used wherever possible, to illustrate and highlight the history of Africans of South africa.

My reasons for writing about Clarke is because he was a Master Teacher both inside the Classroom and outside the classroom,. in lecture halls and the stoops and corners of Harlem. His other theme running the gamut of his video lectures was the fact that he wanted to "restore African which was lost from the respectful commentary of history", into a respectable discipline with its own Historiography presented from African point of view. We catch up with Clarke wherein he writes:

"Until quite recently, it was rather generally assumed, even among well-educated persons in the West, that the continent of Africa was a great expanse of land, mostly jungle, inhabited by savages and fierce beasts. It was unthought of that great civilizations could have been born in the might and wisdom over vast empires. It is true that there were some notions current about the cultural achievement of Egypt, but Egypt was conceived as a Europe land rather than as a country of Africa.

"Even if a look on an atlas showed Egypt to be in Africa, then popular thought immediately saw in the Sahara desert a formidable barrier ad a convenient division of Africa into two parts: one, north of the Sahara, was inhabited by European-like people of High Culture and noble history: the other, south of the 'sahara, was inhabited by a dark-skinned people who had no culture, and were incapable of having done anything in their dark and distant past that could be dignified by the designation of "history." Such ideas, of course, are far from the truth, as we shall see. But it is not difficult to understand why they persisted, and, unfortunately, still persist in one form or another in the popular mind.

"The significance of African History is shown, though not overtly, in the very effort to deny anything worthy of the the name of history to Africa and the African peoples. This widespread, and well nigh successful endeavor, maintained through some five centuries, to erase African history from the general record, is a fact which of itself should be quite conclusive to thinking and open minds. For it is logical and apparent that no such undertaking would ever have been carried on, and at such length, in order to obscure and to bury what is actually of little or no significance

"The significance of African history becomes still more manifest when it is realized that this deliberate denial of African history arose out of the European expansion and invasion of Africa which begun in the middle of the fifteenth century. The compulsion was thereby felt to attempt to justify such colonialist conquest, domination, enslavement, and plunder. Hence, this brash denial of history and culture to Africa, and, indeed, even of human qualities and capacity for "civilization" to the indigenous peoples of Africa."

Clarke Telling His Life told In His Own Soulful Oratory Historical Diction

"I have often been asked what led me to begin my researches on what I will call [African] History. As I look back on it now, I think it really began in my early childhood when it was firmly impressed on me by the ruling classes that African people were inherently inferior and that their sole reason for being was to be servants to white people and the lighter-colored mulattoes. The Africans, I was told, had never accomplished anything in all of history, which of course began "with Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden," and that such signs of civilization they now showed were due to the benevolence of Christian Whites who had dragged them from Africa and cannibalism, thereby plucking as 'brands from the burning' of hell and eternal torment.

"The Christian Africans themselves said 'amen' to this and joined in spreading the doctrine. My Sunday School teacher, an almost unmixed 'negro'[African will be used henceforth), told us that African people were cursed by god and doomed to eternal servitude to White people because "Ham" had laughed at his drunken father, Noah. to clinch his argument, he read to us from the Bible, which we were taught was infallible. Doubt but a single, try to change but a title, and you were doomed to burn in hell forever and ever. The slave-masters and kidnappers had indeed done their work well. They had so incorporated their iniquities with the Christian religion that when you doubted their racism, you were contradicting the Bible and flying in the face of God Almighty.

"As for the devout Christian African who taught us, so great an impression did he make on my mind that I still remember his features and his name though nearly half a century has passed. Of course it was understood that if one had a mixture of "White blood," which was true in my case, one's future was not so entirely hopeless. Still, one could never reach the heights of intelligence and accomplishment of an unmixed white person, for any visible degree of African strain immutably consigned one to be "lower than the angels," that is, the Whites.

"This eternal inferiority included me. However, even at the risk of eternal torture, I could not swallow this sincere, but gullible, tool of the master class was telling me. There was a streak of logic in me that prevented it. I had been told that God was good.Why, then, I asked myself, had he doomed millions and millions of people to such an ignominious fate simply because their 'ancestor' thousands of years ago had laughed at his father because the father had been acting like a pig. Was God so much in favor of drunken fathers?

"I had further more noticed that one of the brightest of my schoolmates were unmixed Africans and some of them were were more brilliant than some of he White ones. The principal of the school, too, was a mulatto. I also saw around me 'black'(African) physicians and lawyers, all graduates of the best English and Scottish universities. It the African strain were inherently inferior, why had these African people been able to accomplish these things and be more advanced than some of the barefooted White adults I knew? Still I did not contradict the Sunday School teacher. I was not supposed to. My business was to swallow what I heard.

"One word of doubt and I would be promptly dubbed an "infidel," which was at bottom worse than being a criminal because a criminal could be saved and go to heaven while special torment in hell, a la Dante, was reserved for deliberate unbelievers.(Bantu Biko addressed the 'fire and brimstone' religion parcelled to Africans in the early days of settlers' colonialism-whereby the Africans were told of hell and burning eternal fires if they did not believe in a God who had wrath to dish out).

"If you did not swallow all the good things the existing order told you, including the yarn about the whale swallowing Jonah, and Moses turning his stick into a snake, you were not only not a good Christian, but also not a good citizen. I distinctly recall two individuals I have been especially taught to look down on: one was a man who used to argue with my father about the miracles of the Bible, which he called "rubbish"; the other was a relative, a light mulatto who had married a 'black' woman. Race, prejudice, religion, and good citizenship went together.

"Of course, the above will seem an exaggeration to many. Well, we cans still find plenty of it in any English-speaking land. Millions of White in the South, what H. L Mencken called "the Bible belt," pin their faith on the Ham story. One thing that I have learned from my travels, especially in civilized lands, is that stupid beliefs and superstition never die no matter how mechanical progress advances.

"Even some of the world's great intellectuals find strength and comfort in the superstitions about race. [B. Berry "names many of the stupid beliefs still held even by many educated people. Especially is tis so in the matter of physiognomy. You will find, he says, some of those listed in Who's Who and American Men Of Science "who will not balk for a moment at the theory that kinky hair and black skin reveal low intelligence and musical temperament and that blond hair and blue eyes reveal intellectual and spiritual excellence."

"Jim Crow and upright Christian living are held to be indivisible by millions of Whites, especially in the United States and the British colonies and dominions ... As I grew older, I revolted more and more at this asininity concocted by the "master race" but I had no books at hand to contradict it, nor knowledge of any kind. To make matters worse, I had from an African friend of mine, a book in which this alleged inherent inferiority was stressed, and which, ironically, had been given to him as first prize for the best essay in which White children had also competed. Years later, to make it still worse, I read Thomas Dixon's The Classman, a highly emotional novel in which all but the Uncle Toms were painted in a most horrible light and which said that if one had but a "drop" of "Negro(African) Blood" he was damned intellectually forever.

"There were also books on Africa, 'darkest Africa," by Stanley, and works of missionaries in which Africans were painted either as faithful dogs or horrible savages. Occasionally, I heard a newly returned missionary from Africa, who, at a Sunday service, would paint a most pitiable picture of what he called the "heathen," and preach how we should all contribute, and put into the collection plate "the feathers that would make the gospel fly."

"Incidentally, when I did go to Africa, I saw natives lived who better than a large number of Whites in Europe, especially in England and Italy, and who, unlike the Whites, could not even read the Bible. As for the poorer Africans, I venture to say that their huts of grass, sticks, and clay were no worse than the slums I saw in the East End of London.

"... But after these experiences, I began to search for some world figures that were of African ancestry. However, There was not a single one to be found, so carefully had they been expurgated by the Masters. Alexander Dumas was one of my favorites, but not a single word was there is his African strain. Literature, religion, education had all been carefully bleached.

"At last I did hear of one great mulatto whose "race" could not be id because I knew people who had seen him, and who was then in the world news-General Antonio Maceo, Cuba's greatest military leader. However,it was not until years later that I found in Chicago a friend who introduced me to books in which I found names of several great men of African ancestry, past and present. In my spare time, and with no thought of writing a book, I began too collect some of these names. That was about 1911.

"About a year later, however, I had a setback from an entirely different quarter. I belonged then to a racial economic group composed of Whites and Africans. When during a discussion at one meeting, I mentioned great Africans and how I had been collecting their names, there was a general howl of disapproval from the Whites and most of the Africans. They called me "chauvinist" and said that I was suffering from an inferiority complex.

"Who were these great Africans I was digging up? Tools of the capitalist order or they wouldn't be in capitalist books. In short,, I was one of the most despicable of all creatures. : an African who was a capitalist hero-worshiper. Furthermore, they said, such work as I was engaged in would be useless when "the industrial revolution" came and color differences mattered no more. That. a true radical would be studying Marx, Engels, and La Fargue, and preparing for the workers' utopia, which was just around the corner.

"With my enthusiasm dampened by this rebuff, I allowed much time to pass without doing any research on great Africans. However, I noticed that books alleging inherent African inferiority continued to appear And Dixon's Clansman had now been made into a flaming attack on Africans in a motion picture, The Birth Of A Nation." All of these, I felt, should be answered not with sentiment, as I noticed certain White friends of the African and Africans themselves were doing in the the Chicago press, but with facts.

"It seemed to me, too, that if the new order was going to be all that my radical friends said it would be, then one of its aims would be not to exclude or ignore the cultures of minorities but to conserve them, as a knowledge of other peoples and their art, literature, and accomplishments helps to produce that variety necessary for a High state of civilization. I decided also that those who were really interested in righting the African's wrongs in a concrete way ought to welcome any knowledge that would equip them with the means of refutation of African inferiority.

"About this time, I also made what was to me an important discovery, namely, that the recital of the deeds of the great or the worthy was instinctive in humanity. I found that all peoples-English, French, Germans, Spaniards, Italians, Americans, Chinese, Jews, Moslems-had lists of their great and noted men. And more than that, even states of the union, cities, and small towns had their list of greats," as well as doctors, scientists, lawyers preachers, engineers, and almost every professional group. Why, even the radicals who had called me a chauvinist had their own heroes whom they were forever extolling and whom they worshiped as blindly as the conservatives did theirs.

"What the radicals really wanted was that I should worship at their own particular shrine, eschewing all others. Moreover, I felt that if I were the victim of an inferiority complex, I certainly had a host of illustrious company dating back to Plutarch with his Lives of Illustrious Greeks and Romans.

"Another thought that decided me to continue my researches was that man's chief knowledge of himself was what has been done by man.; that the good and the evil that others have done were our sole guide through life's wilderness. And was not the recital of great and stirring deeds the most gripping of all dramas? To bring out the best in ourselves (and at times the worst, too0 a study of the lives of the great of all races, ages, and climes, is a necessity. Biography will ever be the highest and most civilizing form of literature. That is why Plutarch is still a best seller after two thousand years.

"As regards "race," a concept that was thrust upon me ) I had never felt otherwise than as a member of the human race), I realize that the further back the African's past could be pushed, the more ridiculous would appear the old slave-holding dogma of African "inferiority." I saw, also, that the White overlords to inflate the ego of their own group had reached back to claim the cola-black Ethiopian, the mulatto Egyptian, the black Hindu, the Negroid Polynesian, not to mention certain individuals of African ancestry such as Aesop, Terence, Cleopatra, and Mohammed, white.

"Later, I saw Mussolini trying to prime his people by telling them of their great Roman past; and Hitler puffing up his by calling them Aryans and claiming that the Ancient Egyptians were really Teutons. In short, African history was only a rebuttal of this braggadocio of the White master. Let me say here that I feel emphatically that any boasting by Africans about their history is just as nauseating. Furthermore, those individuals who work themselves up to a state where they talk as if the deeds of an ancestor were actually done by themselves will probably go no further than that in doing something worthy themselves. One of the world's greatest needs has ever been unboastful, unbiased history.

"I noticed too that there was an urge not only to delve into national and "racial" history, but into individual ancestry also. I thought of the great genealogical societies, of the immense number of books tracing genealogies even here in America, and of the money paid out by the newly-rich and others for a family tree and a coat-of-arms. I was especially struck by one magazine founded in 1809, The Mayflower Descendants. the minutely traced living Americans to the Mayflower, even though such strain after more than 300 years is extremely attenuated. Yes, it does appear that a past is necessary to man as roots to a tree.

"It is undeniable that a knowledge of ones ancestors does have a certain psychological value, especially if such ancestors are worthy. Especially for youths would this be an inspiration. In short, as with almost everything else, ancestry is what you make of it. I reasoned now that since so many other groups and individuals were tracing their past, why should the objection be so strong when the African did so? Was not such objection but another manifestation of the White superiority complex, even in the case of the White economic radicals?

"Something now about the research itself. That was not easy since the story of the contacts of Whites and Africans is usually told from the White angle. to get the material I had to browse through an immense number of books and other printed matter in the libraries of america, Europe, and North Africa, as well as search long and persistently through museums, old bookshops, churches and private collections. I knew for instance, that the Africans had been important in Portuguese history, but I sought in vain, at lest in books of English text, for the name of a single great Portuguese African. It was not until I went to Portugal that I did learn of some.

"This brings me to what is usually meant by "Negro" ancestry. What most scientists and sociologists call a "Negro" (When achievements are being spoken of) is a highly specialized and very 'primitive' type that has been isolated in central Africa or New Guinea for thousands of years, as isolated as were the savages Julius Caesar saw in Britain. Of this type there are, at most, but a million and a half, too few in number to have built up a civilization at any time.When, however, it is a question of what is not very creditable, the African variety is made to include hundred of million of Individuals, some of whom are Nordic in color and features than many Whites

"The Scientists are as divided on who is a "Negro" as he theologians are on who is God. the ethnologists certainly cannot say because ethnology is but a mass of conflicting opinions based on the opinions of observers who were subject to many influences and made pronouncements according to their personal likes and dislikes of this or that people. What ethnology has to say on the alleged inferiority of certain people reminds one of the Haitian proverb, "When the rooster and the cockroach come to court, you don't have to guess which will win." What ethnology needs most is emancipation from an exploiting capitalism-a complete divorce from the slave master's legend of Ham.(Clarke has touched on this above on tis section, when talking about his being indoctrinated in Sunday School and so on).

"As certain individuals who I know positively are of "Negro"(African) ancestry, but are fair enough to "pass" for something else will say that they are of Indian, Spanish, os south american ancestry, so do certain anthropologists in the case of evidently 'negroid'(African) peoples as the Egyptians, Moors, Ethiopians, and some Asiatic and Polynesian peoples, the entire idea in both cases being to duck admission of "Negro")African) ancestry. Even in the case of those paleolithic men whose "Negro"(African) characters were evident they use such phrases as "Proto-Negroid."

"Ones ancestry does not come out of the air. Every "atom" of our ancestry could be accounted for. Many, many millions of individuals over vast centuries-individuals who lived and breathed even as ourselves-built it up as surely as insects build up a coral reef. Had thee been the tiniest break in our ancestral line we could not be the individuals we now are. In fact, we might never have been born at all. No matter how proud one may be of his ancestry, no matter how far back he may trace it to great kings and chiefs who lived, he reaches inevitably a point of obscurity as dark as the darkest depths of the ocean. To talk, therefore, of a "pure" race or a "pure" ancestral line is abysmal ignorance.

Hundreds Of Years Of African Warrior Nationalists Resistance

"For a period of more than a hundred years, AfricanWarrior nationalists, mostly Kings, who had never worn a store-brought shoe or heard of a military school, out-maneuvered and out-generaled some of the finest military minds of europe. they planted the seeds of African independence for another generation to harvest.

Prof. Clarke discusses the biographies of Ethiopia's last golden age to leaders of the resistance movements against the Europeans in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, as to how, in brief, the held off the European invaders and this was transferred down to the later revolutionaries of the 1940s to 1980's revolutionaries who worked just as hard to liberate and give Africa its present post-neo colonial city state as we know of them today. Clarke informs us this way as to the resistance in the 19th and 20th century resistance:

"The southern origins of North African civilizations have been established; here alluding to some proof.

"Sir E. A. Wallis Budge writes: "The prehistoric native of Egypt, both in the Old and New Stone Ages, was an African, and there is every reason for saying that the earliest settlers came from the South." There are many things in the manners and customs and religions of the historic Egyptians that suggest that that the original home of their prehistoric ancestors was in a country in the neighborhood of Uganda and Punt. (The biblical land of Punt was in the area now known as somalia).

"My reason for emphasizing the indigenous southern African origin of the ancient Egyptians, who were equally, "Africans," is based upon historical message extracted from the highly respected "Papyrus of Hunefer" found in the Egyptians' and other Nile Vale indigenous Africans' Book of the Coming Forth by Day and Night;

"We came from the beginning of the Nile where the God Hapi dwells, at the foothills of the mountain of the moon. (Kilimanjaro-between Kenya and Tanzania, or Rwenzori in Uganda).

"The civilization of Egypt lasted longer than any other civilization known to man-about 10,000 years. this civilization reached its height and was in decline before before Europe was born.

"Until near the end of the nineteenth century the African freedom struggle was a military struggle. This aspect of African history has been shamefully neglected. I do not believe the neglect is an accident. Africa's oppressors and Western historians are not ready to concede the fact that Africa has a fighting heritage. the africans did fight back and they fought exceptionally well. This fight extended throughout the whole of the nineteenth century.

"The fight was led, in most cases, by African Kings. The Europeans referred to them as 'chiefs" in order to avoid equating them with European Kings. But they were Kings in the truest sense of the word. Most of them could trace their lineage back more than a thousand years. The revolutionary nationalist African Kings are mostly unknown because the White interpreters of Africa still want the world to think that the African waited in darkness for other people to bring the light."

The Short History Of Resistance in Africa

The Generals Of Ghana

"In West Africa the Ashanti Wars started early in the nineteenth century when the British tried to occupy the hinterland of the Gold Coast(now Ghana). There were eleven major wars in this conflict. TheAshanti won all of them, except the last. In these wars Ashanti generals-and we should call them generals, because they were more than equal to the British generals who failed to conquer them-stopped the inland encroachment of the British and commanded respect for the authority of their Kings. In 1844, the Fanti Kings of Ghana signed a bond of agreement with the English. This bond brought a short period of peace to the coastal areas of the country.

"In 1860s King Ghartey, the West African reformer, advocated democratic ideas in government at a time when the democratic institutions of Europe were showing signs of deterioration. King Ghartey ruled over the small coastal kingdom of Winnebah in pre-independent Ghana. He was the driving spirt behind the founding of the Fanti Confederation, one of the most important events in the history of West Africa.

"Other West African Resistance

Founding Of Nigerian Nationalism

In other parts of West Africa resistance to european rule was still strong and persistent. While the drama of Ashanti and other tribal nations was unfolding in the gold Coast, an Ibo slave rose above his humble origins in Nigeria and vied for commercial power in the marketplaces of that nation. In the years before the British forced him into exile in 1885, he was twice a King and was justifiably called "The Merchant Prince of West Africa."His name was Jaja. The story of Jaja is woven through all of the competently written history of Nigeria. His strong opposition to British rule in the 1880s makes him father of Nigerian nationalism.

The French Colonial Connection

In the French colonies the two main leaders of revolts were Behanzin Hossu Bowelle of Dahomey and Samory Toure of Guinea. Behanzin was one of the most colorful and the last of the great Kings of Dahomey. he was also one of the most powerful West Africans during the closing years of the nineteenth century. After many years of opposition to French rule in his country, he was defeated by a French mulatto, General Alfred Dodds. He was sent into exile and died in 1906.

The Sudanese "Black Naopleon"

"Samory Toure, grandfather of Sekou Toure, President of Guinea, was the last of the great Mandingoes in the years following the decline of their power and empire in the Western Sudan. Samory defied the power of France for eighteen years and was often referred to by the French who opposed him as "The Black Napoleon of The sudan". He was defeated and captured in 1898 and died in a mall Island in the Congo River in 1900.

"In the Sudan and in East Africa two men, called dervish warriors, Mohammed Ahmed, known as the Mahdi, and Mohammed Ben Abdullah Hassen, known as the 'Mad Mullah' of Somaliland, were thorns in the side of the Britih Empire. Mohammed Ahmed freed the Sudan of British rule before his death in 1885, and the coutnry stayed free for eleven years before it was reconquered. Mohammed Ben Abdulah Hassen Started his campaigns against the British in Somaliland in 1899 and was not defeated until 1921. Below I present some of Clarke's lpoint on the The warrior "Zulus"

The Generalismo of Chaka

Southern Africa has furnished a more splendid array of warrior Kings than any other part of Africa. Shaka, the Zulu King andWar-Lord, is the most famous, the most maligned and the most interpreted of all the South African Kings. By any fair measurement he was one of the greatest natural warriors of all times. He fought to consolidate African South Africans and to save them from European rule. When he died in 1828, he was winning the fight.

"Shaka's fight was continued with varying degrees of success and failure under the leadership of Moshoeshoe of the Basothos, Cetshwayo, nephew and disciple of Shaka, Lobebengula, whose father Mzlilikazi, built the second Zulu Empire in the now Zimbabwe; and, Bambata who led the last Zulu uprising in 1906.

"The African Freedom Struggles(both in Africa and in the Diaspora) have their roots in the nineteenth century. In our present struggle we would do well to look back at this period in order to look forward more clearly. Our present freedom struggle goes far beyond the liberation of ourselves. Concurrent with this struggle we must join other people and make our contribution toward creating the new age man.

Dr. John Henrik Clarke Christopher Columbus And The African Holocaust

Africa After Independence: Realities of Nationhood Paperback by Godfrey Mwakikagile

Recovering The Lost Concept And Notion Of A "Nation"...

If we do a serious evaluation of African history, and because it is so broad, I will confine myself to South African African history, and how it has been shaped right up to the point it is today, it has been an amazing and revealing journey. It is a revealing journey now that we have a 20/20 vision and perspective as to what happened to African people all over the globe when colonization took crouched up on their sense of nationhood-because of the African Historiography now available..

This point was not lost to one Master Teacher, Prof. J.H. Clarke who astutely observed and prolifically wrote that:

"The major loss in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries was the concept of nation, the attaching of Africans onto other nations: some to England, some to France, some to Portugal, and then some to the worst of the element to come out of Europe-the United States.

"Europe was getting rid of its human waster matter. It sent some to Australia; it sent some to the Pacific. And here we have to look again at what happened to the Africans in the Pacific. What happened to the Africans in Tasmania? The entire Island was destroyed. The British sent a lot of Irish prisoners, oppressed White people, to Tasmania, the Islands near Australia, where every man,woman and child was destroyed. The British knocked one year to dive years off an Irish prisoner's sentence, depending on how many Tasmanians he killed. And bringing two matching ears to the British authorities to show that you had killed a Tasmanian, would mean one year to five years off of your sentence."

Therefore, according to Clarke, a people memories were wiped out in various ways. Criminals were exported from the British prisons and sent to the Islands in the middle of the ocean with the hope that they will not be able to survive and might die out there. There was also reports from other sources that these prisoners were shipped out to sea because there was the belief that the earth was flat, and that these prisoners put onto these ships, for the Islands, as we learned from Clarke, would come to the precipice or edge of the *flat earth*(Sot the Flat Earth proponents believed, and die off). But, as Clarke pointed out, a provision was made in case they survived, and they were forced to be be more criminal in their populating those Island and by killing-off the inhabitants, they were assured of some years shaved off their sentence.
A genocide of a people is one way of assuring that the memories they had about nationhood get wiped -off the face of the earth. Another way was conditioning Africans, amongst themselves, through the governing techniques of 'divide and conquer', the Africans were made to forget about what kind of people or nation as they were; instead, the have been reduced to fighting one another to earn the bread-crubs, favorability, and acceptance into the White world by abusing and and ill-treating their own people, brothers and fellow beings. Clarke reminds us thus:

"Here is something we do not understand today: "the nature of oppressed people preying on other oppressed people in order to resist oppression". When we use the the term "Third World," we better use it carefully. Because there are a whole lot of people in the "Third World" who, in order to ingratiate themselves to their oppressor, would gladly become an "honorary" oppressor where we are concerned."

With the advent of the Web and the proliferating social media, Africans in South Africa reading this post will become aware of what Clarke is saying, immediately, because they are now faced with a quislings and cabals draped in Black skins, but pushing the former oppressor's agenda with such exuberance and gusto, that they end up being belligerent towards their own people who put them in power, and they end up(these elected leaders) in the service of Imperial and Corporate service and deep local and international fiscal pockets.

One need read most of the posts here on the FB, of which, the majority of them are decrying the fact that the present-day ANC government is nothing but a stooge of Big Capital and a lackey of Imperial governments doing their bidding, and they getting the 'commission' for their omission and oppression of their own people from the wealth and loop of the riches of the country. They report the body-count to Pharmaceutical conglomerates; they report their body count of malnourished and food poisoned dead bodies of the poor to Monsanto; They get their uniforms and guns from the SADF, through the American Military and Industrial Megalomaniac Complex.

They get their share of some sort of payback from DeBeers, Anglo and other mining magnates for allowing theme to scoop out the diamonds and gold of South Africa and Warehousing it in London and Swiss Banks-leaving our mines depleted and too deep and expensive to dig for more gold; the present-day ANC government has been parcelling land out for the highest bidders and getting their shares from the investors and these mighty Conglomerates and predatory Imperial Capitalist honchos.

Because we still smarting to the world as African people who have "Ubuntu", the majority oppressed still have to wrap their heads around the fact that we are the losers in what is happening to our country and its minerals. We are willing accomplices, in admiring and trying to woo this government vultures at the expense of the future of our children, who are faced with the prospects of inheriting barren and depleted-of-minerals lands. Professor Clarke hit it spot-on when he writes:

"Yet with our goodness (our built-in hope), our beautiful humanity, our belief in justice for all people, we fall into their traps." Most of those non-Africans and those who consider themselves not Africans unless it is convenient for them to do so, "they watch to see you fight for something," Clarke adds, "and the minute you win they come in and ask for half of it, when they were never even in the fight. And many ties they get it.. You give them half of your pie, and they want parity, which means half.

"Because we have not learned to practice, figuratively speaking, the essential selfishness of survival, we should give no piece of the pie until every member of our family has a piece of the pie.. If you fight for a pie, then you fight for it for your family, and I wish you well. But I fought for this for my own kith and kin, and they take the priority in its distribution.

"If we are going to be free[the African world] and the whole world from Western domination, we have to envision ourselves as having the ability to do so; we have to have some understanding of the world when it was under the domination of Europe. European domination has noting to do with the European having a superior mind, of having ability that you do not have. It has to do with the fact that the European believed he could do it and gained enough confidence to do it.. We can do the same if we make up our minds to do it.

"Now, as a result of the European's rise to power, a revolution began in the world, one we must now revolt against. To revolt against it, we must understand how it began. How did we lose lose our Africanness? What will we have to do to regain it? How did we lose the concept of "Nationness and develop a concept of dependency?

The most dangerous of all dependencies is to depend on your powerful oppressor to free you and share power with you, because powerful people never train powerless people to take their power away from them. So, we're dealing with a contradiction in terms.

"It is a contradiction to go into schools and to expect education; there is only a form of indoctrination.There are certain basic curricula that we can use to educate ourselves. Therefore, for us, most of our education must happen in the home, in the community and the church. You think the church is a less spiritual institution when it is engaging in education? It is not; it is a more spiritual institution. There are many ways of praying and there are many ways of serving whatever deity you happen to choose. What should concern us is how we got into this trap so that we can estimate how we're going to get out of it."

Whether as African South Africans we like what I am about to say or not, anyone is free to disagree. We have walked into a trap in our haste to acquire "freedom" and economic "parity" with Whites-not necessarily taking control of our land and economy.. We took our children to the White people's expensive and private schools.Our children lost their ability to speak their mother tongues, acknowledge their cultures, customs and traditions; our children look at us with indifference and as buffoons(we the parents and extended elder families and their peers) as backward, and uneducated about anything and the finer things of life.

"We need to bridge these words with the meanings of our times" stated Obama.

African people need not only display our fluency in being able to cite intellectual or coveted leaders. Their words and action ought to direct and give meaning to our understanding the action and the roles we need to play. Their words and the meanings of their daring actions need not only be something we regurgitate, but be blueprints and protocols for the emancipation of the people. We have to know by now, since most of us are Web savvy what it is all about and how it should be used(as in the case of the social media). Social Media should be the vehicle through which we bridge the gaps of divisions amongst ourselves into a collaborative working forum that moves the stagnant struggles we are mired-in forward.

People in our communities are besieged by drugs of all sorts we have never had before the coming of the ANC. We knew, then, that Sol Kezner was peddling coke, and some other soccer magnates; we knew that there was something called the Mandrax,and sold through many illicit ways. Now we have a deluge of every drug conceivable circulating in our midst; our children are splurged with pornography and most people save it in their cell phones; Rape is on the rise so do other crimes of "Africans on Africans"; the people who are suffering with HIV/AIDS, are left to wither away before they are given the Anti-Virals; chronic joblessness is creating all kinds devastation and despair not yet calibrated as to what does it all mean as it is ongoing as of the writing of this piece.

Africans of South Africa now that there is a culture that is practiced nationally by all the groups that make the nation of Mzantsi. We have to first of all get rid of the hangover that has been the left-ovr of Apartheid. We are not "Tribes". By referring to ourselves as such, we are defeating the idea of seeing ourselves as a nation. African Consciousness means African awareness of the African's place in the world today, and the possibility as to where they could be tomorrow were they conscious. Knowing more about each other will help in the growth of a holistic understanding and appreciation of our own culture.

So that, to be able to see ourselves as a nation, we need to be cognizant and aware of our national make-up today as we speak. We have marriage customs and traditions; we have rules governing families and societies; there are specific laws and rules for labor and community services; we have, given the expanse of African history, a curricula that can serve our needs as an African people, as touched-upon by Clarke above. Africans have a history of everything the endeavor to take upon, without borrowing or aping other cultures, customs, traditions, languages, dance and music-the whole bit!

The day Africans in South Africa are able to link their present-here-and-now reality, to historical data and future planning, that will be the day the revolution of any kind will begin moving ahead. Understanding What the Media is and how to use it for one's gains is very important to come to grips with. Media, therefore, is just like oral communication, but using a gadget. I am not here talking about the TV, Radio or newspaper media, but technological media of the computer sort. Supporting one another and not being careless about our relationships with one another is of prime importance. The fulcrum of our culture is "UBuntu/Botho" along with with "Inhlonipho/hlompho"(respect).

I am saying all the above because most of us have become so westernized, that we have imbibed Western values, mores, moral and norms to the detriment of our culture as I have described it above, because "Shakespeare was a great writer and whatever; because Richard Elliot was the greatest poet; because; eating out in restaurants has been imposed as a new African normal; McDonald's is the fast way in and out for ones activities; buying hook-and-sink into Westernized consumer patterns, fashion clothes is the sign of modernity; cars, housing, mannerisms, literature, music and mind-set, has become a way to show-off one's status in society, and sophistication about what others do not have, that one is the only one that has; Western individualism and fake accents and fake knowledge of a history, culture, tradition, custom and languages not of one's own. We have and are living large in the shadows of other peoples ways of life, stories, and mannerism: Cultures. We have discarded out own ways(African Culture); have disdain and shame about our own culture, that in the end, instead of focusing on building a nation based on what our cultures offers, we 'pick up our noses' at it as if its unpalatable and has an odious odor, and label it derisively and dismissively.

We brag about our jobs(which we do not own), cars and big houses in the suburbs(which we all owe); sporting the finest clothes of Europe and America; we wear expensive perfumes(French, Italian and American); import and expert house ware, dishes, shoes; go to these foreign countries and spend thousands of Rands on clothes and other trinkets and stay if five star hotels; we hobnob with VIP's and Heads of States; we stay in areas whose real estate could finance a whole Townships with everything; We take planeloads of fun-lovers remote Islands and rent-out a whole hotel and party for days. We piggin away into our own destruction-espaecially the monied African Elite

Nations are not build from such ways of being and existing. We seem to fall into the trap that we are seeing big money for the first time, that we are out of our minds and wits as to what to do with it. There are many tales of waste and reckless spending that have become the lore of the African elite; our children burn clothes and money to show-off the their vanity and ignorance along with boredom, plus lack of direction. It would be better if we knew what we were doing than wax political and rant revolutionary. All are pretentious acts that are an effort of a people running away from what is facing them: ignorance, mental illnesses; devastating illnesses like Cholera, TB, Scurvy, Alcoholism, Drug Addiction; rampant and callous corruption; insecurities; gloom and doom; bleak futures; joblessness; decaying communities and cultures, morals, mores, norms, customs, traditions,languages, discarding of sacred rites and practices which are fast disappearing permanently; miseducation and oppression, depression, repression. No Nation Will Ever Arise From A Disunited And Dysfunctional People!

This is what Professor Clarke as to say about all I have been talking about in the previous paragraphs:

"What I am trying to look into is how people maintain certain techniques that make them believe enough in themseles and become less dependnent on other people in order to be whole again. And that the nature of oppression robs us oof our wholeness, a lot of our confidnence, and, if we're going to have a cultural revolution, this cultural revolution must first be based on regaining our confidence in our ability to handle everything in a nation."

Prof. Clarke continues:
"That is why I have always disagreed with the current approach to South africa; that we need to fight more than Apartheid. apartheid is a real issue. apartheid has caused misery to millions of people. We need to fight it all the way, but, while fighting it we need to prepare to take over that nation. A nation needs railroads. Who's going to build them? But if we buy steel from someone else, we've got to pay a high price. Who's going to develop an internal steel industry? Who's going to master the mines? Who's going to market what comes out of the mines? All of this is part of the restoration of self-confidence, and all of this involves a return to things that we've already done at a previous time in history.

"That is why, especially in [South africa] we are literally kept from our history. If you expect the present-day school system to give history to you, you are dreaming. This, we have to do ourselves. The Chinese didn't go out in the world and beg people to teach Chinese studies or let them them teach Chinese Studies. the Japanese didn't do that either. People don't beg other people to restore their history; they do it themselves. They learn something about freedom that we to learn. Freedom is something we must take with our own hands and secure it with our won hands. If other people's hands secure it for us, other people's hands can take it away from us. Our main ally and our most dependable ally in the fight for freedom is ourselves."

In our thinking about revolution and carrying out a revolution, we had better come to grips as to what is a nation and how are we going to go about creating and building a viable and authentic nation. Words should give meaning to our intentions and our intentions is to execute those meanings, words and works as part of our struggle and reality. As this piece is being written, it can be regarded and taken as a preface of our writing our own history and all that it requires from our own perspective and mindset. We shall only succeed if we read what each is composing, not only copying from someone, and if all can come with original ideas that are relevant and relatable to the the reality on the ground-from the Townships to the villages and suburbs,we might in the end be original in highlighting those pertinent and basic issues which resonate and are relevant to the people one is trying to mobilize and organize.

It is true, quotations, such as I have used from Clarke in this article should be used to edify one's points; also, those basic needs the people are decrying should be etched onto our writing just as powerful in their rhetoric as those we would be citing. What we cite, should most of the time confirm what we are writing/talking about. What we are writing about and composing should be spot-on and relatable and relevant for the people to whom the writing is done on behalf of and for.

Just as in national-building, the material,ideas and ways and means that we will be utilizing should come from what the culture offers and has picked up on along the centuries-morphing and modifying the new and the old-that, from that entity, we can create a nation. But it will take understanding the meaning of the words and their relevance to to our present-and how we articulate, execute and manifest that which we know, have learnt and mastered from and about our cultures, customs, traditions,histories, languages, sacred rites and practices within the make-up and formation of a nation as we see fit..

If we can learn about learning from each each other, respect our/each's ideas, thoughts and intentions, we might be able to grasp, fully and clearly, the notion and ways of Nation building and unification... We need to better stop acting like we know, and yet we have still so much much ground to cover and learning - all to do about building a nation, let alone executing a revolution We will never ever be Americans, nor Europeans or any other nation, but Africans of South Africa(Mzantsi). Maybe if we we start with that recognition, we might have our eyes, eyes, minds and hearts opened as to the importance of all that is ours, originally and authentically and autonomously.... maybe manage to start to build a nation in from 2013 onwards-as the voting is around the corner(2014), and we are only a nation when it is time for voting-after that we are discarded like snuff mucous.. We are much far better than this...

Dr. John Henrik Clarke, Dr. Ivan Van Sertima, Dr. Yosef Ben Jochanna

Black Children: Their Roots, Culture, and Learning Styles Paperback by Janice E. Hale-Benson (Author) , Asa G. Hilliard III (Foreword)

Historical Cultural Memory

The Families Of Africans Of South Africa

Whereas the video above is about the destruction of the African family due to American slavery, in this part we will review, a tad bit, the Africa family in South Africa. I have attempted to address part of the structure and function of the African family in South Africa in my Hub titled: "Restoration Of African South African Historical Consciousness: Culture, Customs, Traditions & Practices", wherein I was giving a full description and how this culture functioned from the family unit to being part of the African national mosaic pre-settler and pre-European colonizers who were invaders and or a descendant of an invader, subsequently occupied and enslaved a whole population, and mostly destroyed the African family as described, partly in the Hub mentioned above, and in two other Hubs which I titled, "South African Culture, Customs and Practices Writ Large: Re-Morphed Cultural Renaissance Against Dysfunctional Existence," and "History, Culture, Customs, Traditions and Practices Of The Africans of South Africa: Deconstructing Historical Amnesia."

The African family in South Africa, amongst the Africans begun to be destroyed by the arrival of the settlers, particularly those in 1652 and the subsequent wars against the Xhosas, Zulus, Pedis and other groups within South Africa proper.Further destruction that contributed to the destruction of African families were the "Mfecane"(Scatterings) which were mostly caused by Shaka and his aries(See my Hub titled "Great Celebrities in Ancient History: The Rise and Fall of the Zulu King Shaka."

It is incumbent upon Africans of South Africa to review and revise their present culture, although as Biko pointed out, the vicissitudes of the apartheid Wars have frayed it nearly to its core, but it still exists in a myriad forms. One of these ways through which it survives, is discussed in-depth and with history, music, dance and traditional garb is discussed and posted in the Hub I wrote titled "Music Is The Soundtrack Of Our Lives: Breaking and Breaching The Musical Sound Barrier"; "African Music Is High Culture: The Power Of Song in The Struggle For Survival;" and "South African Music & Dance's Struggle Against Culture Wars: A View Of The Music and Dance Of Africans of South Africa."

It is within these Cultures that I highlight the variegated and diverse cultures of South Africa by talking and posting their short histories, music, traditional garb and dance. This is one way I was showing the fact that these cultures did not die, as stated by the Apartheidizers, but are still existing and functioning. It is also capturing the authentic essence of these cultures that I believe that those whose culture it is, will recognize in these Hubs the originality of the narratives/performances and their relevance to them in contemporary South Africa.

The Hubs I have quoted above go much deeper into the Historical cultural, customary, traditional, literature, linguistic and traditional garb to establish the consistency and constant manifestation of the culture of Africans. In the Hub where I talk about dysfunction, the goal there was to show that the culture of the African people today in Mzantsi is linked to the civilization of Mapungubwe which was situated at the confluence of Botswana, Zimbabwe and the "Old Transvaal' on the Limpopo river. It also sought to show how this culture of Mapungubwe was a derivative and linked to the Civilization and Kingdom of Monomotapa.

Therefore, the similarities and sameness of these diverse but common cultures is not in any way different, inasmuch as they are extensions and variations of each other-They mirror each other in many ways. So that, their family functions are the same, albeit differentiated by their languages and regions, their are like siamese twins linked by an umbilical cord of the culture and Africanism of South Africa.

African South African history, culture, traditions, customs, languages, sacred rites and practices, for the Hubs above, has provided Africans with a cultural model, modal and mode. There is already an African South African culture, and I have written a Hub and posted videos to highlight it and its manifestations,there are semblances of a cultural, customary, traditional, linguistic, historical and practices of thereof. The readers here are referred to a Hub I titled: "South African Music & Dance's Struggle Against Culture Wars: A View Of The Music and Dance Of Africans of South Africa." It is from this Hub I have referred to that Africans can trace and resuscitate their besieged cultures, customs, traditions, languages and sacred rites and practices along with their history. But of prime importance here, is for Africans to begin to see, recognize and put together their families from their way of life, its past, actions and dances and entertainment and celebrations.

If Africans do not confront this cultural miasma and other social ills that hat been foisted upon them, they are going to find it difficult to progress in the 21st century, let alone the subsequent centuries thereafter. We learn from Fu-Kiang when he writes that:

"I believe people are engaged in such death-bringing activities because of fundamental deviations from basic ethical, moral, and spiritual principles of life and tradition. these fundamental deviations weaken the body's functioning and individual self-healing, power, the best healer of any individual and, therefore, society. It is mortally dangerous to deviate from certain traditions. ..it hurts to lose certain traditions, these are practical principles of life. The loss can lead to self-destruction of the individual, [family], society,the world, and its civilization."

In trying to reconstruct the African family, Africans do not need to copy-cat anyone or any culture. They need to look at their cultures which offers them directions as to what to do with family issues of marriage, of combining families, of raising babies, taking care of the ill and the pregnant women; what the role of married men or boys from the thee initiation school, their duties and role in society; this culture guides its users how to raise little girls, and care for the elderly; it also reminds the people of the games for the children, youth and and young adults; it paves way towards understanding other familiar and same cultures of the Africans of south Africa. In so doing, the cultures is the only sure wayAfrican can begin to reconstruct and revamp their families in the image of themselves and their cultural dictates. The memories stored in it are enough to last the African population throughout its existence on earth.

There is a ton of literature and Web sites and blogs that discuss and try to talk about this culture. But it is the literature written by Africans in their own languages that is ignored. Prof.Clarke in the video above gives us a sense of the South African writers and their books they wrote about Africans of South africa. It is very important to revisit these books written in the different languages of South Africa to try and use their information to help fill the historical, cultural, traditional, customary and other issues that affect them and makes them lag behind. This are chock-full of family settings and the way Africans have been carrying themselves throughout their existence here in South Africa. Knowledge of African cultural, customary, traditional, historical, linguistic and sacred rites and practices, is urgent and of prime importance for all the Africans of South Africa today. It is from these that Africans will be able to restore and rebuild their families, society and peoplehood and Nation-ness.

Dr John Henrik Clarke Are We Ready For The 21 Century?

Black Mother: The Years of the African Slave Trade Hardcover by Basil Davidson

African Slave Trade Profits Used to Finance And Build Contemporary European Economies

Walter Rodney is one of the Master teachers of African History who harps on the fact that the impact of the African mind onto African and world history was immense and immeasurable. We learn from Rodney that:

"The kinds of benefits which Europe derived from its control of world commerce are fairly well known, although it is curious that the recognition of Africa’s major contribution to European development is usually made in works devoted specifically to that subject; while some attempts have been made to try and quantify the actual monetary profits made by Europeans from engaging in the slave trade. The actual dimensions are not easy to fix, but the profits were fabulous. John Hawkins made three trips to West Africa in the 1560s, and stole Africans whom he sold to the Spanish in America. On returning to England after the first trip, his profit was so handsome that Queen Elizabeth I became interested in directly participating in his next venture ; and she provided for that purpose a ship named the Jesus. Hawkins left with the ship Jesus to steal some more Africans, and he returned to England with such dividends that Queen Elizabeth made him a knight. Hawkins chose as his coat of arms the representation of an African in chains.

"Of course, there were inevitably voyages that failed, slave ships that were lost at sea, etc. Sometimes trade in Africa did well, while at other times it was the profit in the Americas that was really substantial. When all the ups and downs are ironed out, the level of profit had to be enough to justify continued participation in that particular form of trade for centuries. A few bourgeois scholars have tried to suggest that the trade in slaves did not have worthwhile monetary returns. They would have us believe that the same entrepreneurs whom they praise in other contexts as the heroes of capitalist development were so dumb with regard to slavery and slave trade, that for centuries they absorbed themselves in a non-profit venture! This kind of argument is worth noting more as an example of the distortions of which white bourgeois scholarship is capable than as something requiring serious consideration. Besides, quite apart from capital accumulation, Europe’s trade with Africa gave numerous stimuli to Europe’s growth.

"Central and South American gold and silver — mined by Africans — played a crucial role in meeting the need for coin in the expanding capitalist money economy of Western Europe, while African gold was also significant in that respect. African gold helped the Portuguese to finance further navigations around the Cape of Good Hope and into Asia ever since the 15th century. African gold was also the main source for the mintage of Dutch gold coin in the 17th century ; helping Amsterdam to become the financial capital of Europe in that period; and further it was no coincidence that when the English struck a new gold coin in 1663 they called it the ‘guinea’. The Encyclopaedia Britannica explains that the guinea was ‘a gold coin at one time current in the United Kingdom. It was first coined in 1663, in the reign of Charles II, from gold imported from the Guinea Coast of West Africa by a company of merchants trading under charter from the British crown — hence the name.’

"Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, and for most o the 19th century, the exploitation of Africa and African labour continued to be a source for the accumulation of capital to be re-invested in Western Europe. The African contribution to European capitalist growth extended over such vital sectors as shipping, insurance, the formation companies, capitalist agriculture, technology and the manufacture of machinery. The effects were so wide-ranging that many are seldom brought to the notice of the reading public. For instance, the French St. Malo fishing industry was revived by the opening up of markets in the French slave plantations; while the Portuguese in Europe depended heavily on dyes like indigo, camwood, Brazil wood and cochineal brought from Africa and the Americas. Gum from Africa also played a part in the textile industry, which is acknowledged as having been one of the most powerful engines growth within the European economy. Then there was the export of ivory from Africa, enriching many merchants in London’s Mincing Lane, and providing the raw material for industries in England, France, Germany, Switzerland, and North America — producing items ranging from knife handles piano keys.

"Africa’s being drawn into the orbit of Western Europe speed up the latter’s technological development. For example, the evolution of European shipbuilding from the 16th century to the 19th century was a logical consequence of their monopoly of sea commerce in that period. During that time, the North Africans were bottled up in the Mediterranean. and although it was from them that Europeans initially borrowed a great deal of nautical instrumentation, North Africans made no further worthwhile advances. Where the original European advantage was not sufficient to assure supremacy, they deliberately undermined other people’s efforts. The Indian navy, for instance, suffered from the rigid enforcement of the English Navigation Laws.

"Yet, the expenses involved in building new and better European ships were met from the profits of overseas trade with India, Africa, etc. The Dutch were pioneers in improving upon the which took the Spanish and Portuguese out across the Atlantic, and the succession of Dutch trading companies operating in Asia, Africa and America were the ones responsible for experimentation. By the 18th century, the British were using Dutch know-how as a basis for surpassing the Dutch themselves, and the Atlantic was their laboratory. It used to be said that the slave trade was a training ground for British seamen. It is probably more significant to note that the Atlantic trade was the stimulator of consistent advances in naval technology.

"The most spectacular feature in Europe which was connected with African trade was the rise of sea-port towns — - notably Bristol, Liverpool, Nantes, Bordeaux and Seville. Directly or indirectly connected to those ports, there often emerged the manufacturing centres which gave rise to the ‘industrial revolution’. In England, it was the county of Lancashire which was the first centre of the industrial revolution and the economic advance in Lancashire depended first on the growth of the port of Liverpool through slave trading.

"The connections between slavery and capitalism in the growth of England is adequately documented by Eric Williams in his well-known book Capitalism and Slavery. Williams gives a clear picture of the numerous benefits which England derived from trading and exploiting slaves, and he identified by name several of the personalities and capitalist firms who were the beneficiaries. Outstanding examples are provided in the persons of David and Alexander Barclay, who were engaging in slave trade in 1756 and who later used the loot to set up Barclays’ Bank. There was a similar progression in the case of Lloyds — from being a small London coffee house to being one of the world’s largest banking and insurance houses, after dipping into profits from slave trade and slavery. Then there was James Watt, expressing eternal gratitude to the West Indian slave owners who directly financed his famous steam engine, and took it from the drawing-board to the factory.

"A similar picture would emerge from any detailed study of French capitalism and slavery, given the fact that during the 18th century the West Indies accounted for 20% of France’s external trade-much more than the whole of Africa in the present century. Of course, benefits were African trade was the rise of sea-port towns — - notably Bristol, Liverpool, Nantes, Bordeaux and Seville. Directly or indirectly connected to those ports, there often emerged the manufacturing centres which gave rise to the ‘industrial revolution’. In England, it was the county of Lancashire which was the first centre of the industrial revolution and the economic advance in Lancashire depended first on the growth of the port of Liverpool through slave trading.

The connections between slavery and capitalism in the growth of England is adequately documented by Eric Williams in his well-known book Capitalism and Slavery. Williams gives a clear picture of the numerous benefits which England derived from trading and exploiting slaves, and he identified by name several of the personalities and capitalist firms who were the beneficiaries. Outstanding examples are provided in the persons of David and Alexander Barclay, who were engaging in slave trade in 1756 and who later used the loot to set up Barclays’ Bank. There was a similar progression in the case of Lloyds — from being a small London coffee house to being one of the world’s largest banking and insurance houses, after dipping into profits from slave trade and slavery. Then there was James Watt, expressing eternal gratitude to the West Indian slave owners who directly financed his famous steam engine, and took it from the drawing-board to the factory.

A similar picture would emerge from any detailed study of French capitalism and slavery, given the fact that during the 18th century the West Indies accounted for 20% of France’s external trade-much more than the whole of Africa in the present century. Of course, benefits were not always directly proportionate to the amount of involvement of a given European state in the Atlantic trade. The enormous profits of Portuguese overseas enterprise passed rapidly out of the Portuguese economy into the hands of the more developed Western European capitalist nations who supplied Portugal with capital, ships and trade goods. Germany was included in this category, along with England, Holland and France.

Commerce deriving from Africa helped a great deal to strengthen trans- national links within the Western European economy, bearing in mind that American produce was the consequence of African labour. Brazilian dyewoods, for example, were re-exported from Portugal into the Mediterranean, the North Sea and the Baltic, and passed into the continental cloth industry of the 17th century. Sugar from the Caribbean was re-exported from England and France to other parts of Europe to such an extent that Hamburg in Germany was the biggest sugar-refining centre in Europe in the first half of the 18th century. Germany supplied manufactures to Scandinavia, Holland, England, France and Portugal for resale in Africa. England, France and Holland found it necessary to exchange various classes of goods the better to deal with Africans for gold, slaves and ivory. The financiers and merchants of Genoa were the powers behind the markets of Lisbon and Seville; while Dutch bankers played a similar role with respect to Scandinavia and England.

Western Europe was that part of Europe in which by the 15th century the trend was most visible that feudalism was giving way to capitalism.

The peasants were being driven off the land in England, and agriculture was becoming a capitalist operation. It was also becoming technologically more advanced — producing food and fibres to support a larger population and to provide a more effective basis for the woollen and linen industries in particular. The technological base of industry as well as its social and economic organisation, was being transformed. African trade speeded up several aspects, including the integration of Western Europe, as noted above. That is why the African connection contributed not merely to economic growth (which relates to quantitative dimensions) but also to real development in the sense of increased capacity for further growth and independence.

American economic development up to mid-19th century rested squarely on foreign commerce, of which slavery was a pivot. In the 1830s, slave-grown cotton accounted for about half the value of all exports from the United States of America. Furthermore, in the case of the American colonies of the 18th century, it can again be observed that Africa contributed in a variety of ways — one thing leading to another. For instance, in New England, trade with Africa, Europe and the West Indies in slaves and slave-grown products supplied cargo for their merchant marine, stimulated the growth of their ship-building industry, built up their towns and their cities, and enabled them to utilise their forests, fisheries and soil more effectively. Finally, it was the carrying trade between the West Indian slave colonies and Europe which lay behind the emancipation of the American colonies from British rule, and it was no accident that the struggle for American independence started in the leading New England town of Boston. In the 19th century, the connection with Africa continued to play an indirect role in American political growth. In the first place, profits from the slave activities went into the coffers of political parties, and even more important the African stimulation and black labour played a vital role in extending European control over the present territory of the U.S.A.

Since capitalism, like any other mode of production, is a total system which involves an ideological aspect, it is also necessary to focus on the effects of the ties with Africa on the development of ideas within the superstructure of European capitalist society. In that sphere, the most striking feature is undoubtedly the rise of racism as a widespread and deeply rooted element in European thought. The role of slavery in promoting racist prejudice and ideology has been carefully studied in certain situations, especially in the U.S.A. The simple fact is that no people can enslave another for centuries without coming out with a notion of superiority, and when the colour and other physical traits of those peoples were quite different it was inevitable that the prejudice should take a racist form. Within Africa itself, the same can be said for the situation in the Cape Province of South Africa where white men were establishing military and social superiority over non-whites ever since 1650.

It would be much too sweeping a statement to say that all racial and colour prejudice in Europe derived from the enslavement of Africans and the exploitation of non-white peoples in the early centuries of international trade.

Africa In An Economical Perspective Pre-Colonial Era


"It has already been indicated that in the 15th century European technology was not totally superior to that of other parts of the world. There were certain specific features which were highly advantageous to Europe-such as shipping and (to a lesser extent) guns. Europeans trading to Africa had to make use of Asian and African consumer goods, showing that their system of production was not absolutely superior. It is particularly striking that in the early centuries of trade, Europeans relied heavily on Indian cloths for resale in Africa, and they also purchased cloths on several parts of the West African coast for resale elsewhere. Morocco, Mauretania, Senegambia, Ivory Coast, Benin, Yorubaland and Loango were all exporters to other parts of Africa — through European middlemen. Yet, by the time that Africa entered the colonial era, it was concentrating almost entirely on the export of raw cotton and the import of manufactured cotton cloth. This remarkable reversal is tied to technological advance in Europe and to stagnation of technology in Africa owing to the very trade with Europe.

"Cloth manufacture in the world went through a stage of handlooms and small-scale craft production. Up to the 16th century, that was the general pattern in Africa, Asia and Europe: with Asian cloth makers being the most skilled in the world. India is the classic example where the British used every means at their disposal to kill the cloth industry, so that British cloth could be marketed everywhere, including inside India itself. In Africa, the situation was not so clear-cut, nor did it require as much conscious effort by Europeans to destroy African cloth manufacture, but the trend was the same. Europe benefitted technologically from its external trade contacts, while Africa either failed to benefit or actually lost.

"Vital inventions and innovations appeared in England in the late 18th century, after profits from external trade had been re-invested. Indeed, the new machinery represented the investment of primary capital accumulated from trading and from slavery. African and Indian trade strengthened British industry, which in turn crushed whatever industry existed in that is now called the ‘underdeveloped’ countries. European industry increased its capacity to produce on a large scale by harnessing the energy of wind, water and coal. European cloth industry was able to copy fashionable Indian and African patterns, and eventually to replace them. Partly by establishing a stranglehold on the distribution of cloth around the shores of Africa, and partly by swamping African products by importing cloth in bulk, European traders eventually succeeded in putting an end to the expansion of African cloth manufacture.

"African demand for cloth was increasing rapidly in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, so that there was a market for all cloth produced locally as well as room for imports from Europe and Asia. But, directed by an acquisitive capitalist class, European industry increased its capacity to produce on a large scale by harnessing the energy of wind, water and coal. European cloth industry was able to copy fashionable Indian and African patterns, and eventually to replace them. Partly by establishing a stranglehold on the distribution of cloth around the shores of Africa, and partly by swamping African products by importing cloth in bulk, European traders eventually succeeded in putting an end to the expansion of African cloth manufacture."

There are many varied social factors which combine to determine when a society makes a breakthrough from small scale craft technology to equipment designed to harness nature so that labour becomes more effective. One of the major factors is the existence of a demand for more products than can be made by hand, so that technology is asked to respond to a definite social need-such as that for clothes. When European cloth became dominant on the African market, it meant that African producers were cut off from the increasing demand. The craft producers either abandoned their tasks in the face of cheap available European cloth, or they continued on the same small hand-worked instruments to create styles and pieces for localized markets. Therefore, there was what can be called ‘technological arrest’ or stagnation, and in some instances actual regression, since people forgot even the simple technique of their forefathers. The abandonment of traditional iron smelting in most parts of Africa is probably the most important instance of technological regression.


How Europe Under Developed Africa: Dr WalterRodney

Studies in a Dying Colonialism Paperback – Import by Frantz Fanon

Pre-Colonial Africa and Its Advanced Development

According to Clarke, we developed society that were enduring, long before any people had books and or civilization. The point I am making by citing at such length fro Rodney is to try and fathom as to When did Africa people loose all what they had and could do? It is a very important point because below I am citing what Africans did as a people/nations in Africa:

African's Contribution To Humanity and Modern Society

Rehabilitating the self-image of the Black African (1)

Having exhaustively demonstrated that the Pharaonic Egyptians were black, Senegalese scholar Cheikh Anta Diop argued that “the moral fruit of [Egyptian] civilization is to be counted among the assets of the Black world. Instead of presenting itself to history as an insolvent debtor, that Black world is the very initiator of the ‘western’ civilization flaunted before our eyes today.” -- [Diop, The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality, p. xiv]

To help us appreciate just how much “western” civilization owes to Black Egypt, this essay presents a sampling of that contribution; a sampling of what the Greeks and Hebrews assimilated and took over from Black Egypt (Kemet) and passed on to modern Europe.

Kemetic Precedents

The purpose of this preliminary list of culture items (concepts, techniques, tools, symbols, artefacts, etc. assembled from scattered sources) is to make it easy to see just how far and comprehensively Kemet was ahead of all other cultures. Such items appear elsewhere later, sometimes by diffusion, sometimes by independent invention, sometimes by theft. How it did so in each case is not always easy to determine. However, in some spectacular cases, plagiarism can be exposed. Items listed are the oldest example extant, or the oldest mentioned in the available sources.

Dates are based on the Chinweizu Chronology which dates the founding of Kemet at 4443±61 BC. This initial list could be, and should be, very much expanded as the literature is combed more extensively and thorough by independent invention, sometimes by theft. How it did so in each case is not always easy to determine. However, in some spectacular cases, plagiarism can be exposed. Items listed are the oldest example extant, or the oldest mentioned in the available sources. Dates are based on the Chinweizu Chronology which dates the founding of Kemet at 4443±61 BC. This initial list could be, and should be, very much expanded as the literature is combed more extensively and thoroughly.

I: Science and Technology

1. Plant domestication:

Domesticated wheat, barley, lentils, chickpeas, capers and dates were being grown and harvested in the Nile flood plains; at Aswan (Wadi Kubbaniya), Esna, Naqada, and Dishna in Upper Kemet (i.e. Southern Egypt), and in Tushka in Nubia; ca. 16,000 BC, during the last Ice Age when much of Eurasia was covered with ice. That was some 9 millennia before plant domestication occurred in Jarmo in Iraqi Kurdistan in SW Eurasia, where Eurocentric convention claims that plants were first domesticated.See Wendorff et al., “An Ancient Harvest on the Nile,” in Van Sertima, ed., Blacks in Science, New Brunswick: Transaction Books, 1983, pp. 58-64. ]

2.Writing:

Hieroglyphics (pictorial) : Predynastic 2i.e. before ca. 4500 BC [See Bruce Williams, “Lost Pharaohs of Nubia” in Van Sertima ed., Egypt Revisited, pp. 93- 94.]

Hieratic (cursive) : Dyn. I or earlier 3, i.e. ca. 4500 BC [M. Hoffman, Egypt Before the Pharaohs, p. 290; Alan Gardiner, Egypt of the Pharaohs, p.22.]

Demotic (cursive) : Dyn XXV 4, i.e. ca. 700 BC. [Alan Gardiner, Egypt of the Pharaohs, p. 21].

Alphabet: “The history of the alphabet begins in Ancient Egypt, more than a millennium into the history of writing. The first pure alphabet emerged around 2000 BCE to represent the language of Semitic workers in Egypt (see Middle Bronze Age alphabets), and was derived from the alphabetic principles of the Egyptian hieroglyphs. Most alphabets in the world today either descend directly from this development, for example the Greek and Latin alphabets, or were inspired by its design.” Wikipedia

Hieroglyphics and Hieratic are the world’s oldest writing systems; from them are derived the Phoenician and Hebrew and Greek alphabets, making them the ancestors of the Roman alphabet which is now used world-wide.[Alan Gardiner, Egypt of the Pharaohs, pp. 25-26.] From them too derive the Arabic script via the Nabataean Aramaic script. Arabic numerals bear a striking resemblance to some of the symbols in Meroitic script, a late offshoot of the Kemetic scripts.

3. The balance and scales (for weighing):

A symbol in hieroglyphics, and a central instrument in the rite of weighing the soul of the deceased in the Judgment Hall before Ausar. [E. A. Wallis Budge, The Egyptian Book of the Dead, pp. 2, 256, 261 etc] for its representation as a hieroglyph and for its presence in vignettes that illustrate the book. For evidence that parts of the work date back to before Dyn. I.

4.The Calendar:

The calendar used today throughout the world is adapted from the civil calendar of Black Egypt. “To the Egyptians we owe the practice of dividing the day into 24 hours. Our modern practice of starting the day at midnight dates back to the Egyptians.”

Kemet had two calendars from its earliest times [Charles Finch, “Science and Symbol in Egyptian Medicine,” in Egypt Revisited, p. 328] -- The calendar used today throughout the world is adapted from the the Civil calendar of Black Africa. “To the Egyptians we owe the practice of dividing the day into 24 hours. Our modern practice of starting the day at midnight dates back to the Egyptians.” 8—[8 John Pappademos, “An Outline of Africa’s Role in the History of Physics”, in Van Sertima ed., Blacks in Science, p. 187]

5. The oldest uninscribed paper:

Two papyrus rolls from Dyn. I, found in a small box at Saqqara.9 [9 M. Hoffman, Egypt Before the Pharaohs, p. 291]

6. The wheel:

Scaling ladders, fitted with wheels, and kept from slipping by a handspike, were used by construction workers as early as Dyn. V. (ca. 3380-3162 BC). They are depicted on the wall of the tomb of Kaemhesit. 10 [10 See Blacks in Science, p. 81, fig. 7.]

7.The so-called Pythagoras Theroem:

The theorem of the square on the hypothenuse was known and used in Kemet, millennia before Pythagoras took knowledge of it from there to Greece.11 [11 Cheikh Anta Diop, Civilization or Barbarism, p. 260]

8.Coordinates:

A system of coordinates was in use in Kemet in Old Kingdom times. In one specimen, probably from Dyn. III, coordinates were used in an architectural drawing to draw a curve. Rectangular coordinate grids were used for star maps shown on the ceilings of tombs. A grid of squares was used to scale up construction plans. 12 [12 See Beatrice Lumpkin, “The Pyramids: Ancient Showcase of African science and technology,” Blacks in Science, pp. 67-83. ]

9.The Oldest record of sea-going ships:

King Sahure of Dyn. V sent a fleet to the coast of Palestine and another to Punt (Somalia).13 [13 See Wayne B. Chandler, “Of Gods and Men: Egypt’s Old Kingdom,” in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Egypt Revisited, p. 168.]

10.The oldest map in the world:

A map, now in the Turin museum, showing the road to one of Kemet’s gold fields.14 [14 Alan Gardiner, Egypt of the Pharaohs., p. 42.]

11.The oldest example of large-scale metal sculpture in the world:

A near life-size copper statue group of Pepi I and his young son Merenre (Dyn. VI).15 [15 See M. Hoffman, Egypt Before the Pharaohs, p. 128.]

12.Stone-paved roads:

“Probably the earliest stone-paved road was built in Egypt . . . when the Great Pyramid was built. In order to move the huge stone blocks making up the pyramid, a smooth road of polished stone was built about 60 feet wide and half a mile long.”16 [16 See “Road” in Britannica Junior Encyclopedia, Vol 13, (1965), p. 109(b)

13.Iron and steel:

Iron was used in Kemet from predynastic times and down through the dynasties, long before its reported use anywhere else in the world. Specimens of materials made of iron have survived from the Gerzean period, Dyns IV,VI, XVIII-XXII.17 [17 C. A. Diop, The African Origin of Civilization, p. 293, n. 8;] The most ancient steel object extant, made of successive layers containing different percentages of carbon, is a knife from Kemet, made probably in the 9th c. BC.18 [18 C. A. Diop, Civilisation or Barbarism, p. 285.] Plutarch reports, based on Manetho, that iron was called “the bone of Typhon,” i.e. Set.19[19 Manetho, p. 191,] There are references to “bat qemau,” iron of the south, in the Kemetic Book of Resurrection.20[20 See, e.g. Budge, Egyptian Book Of the Dead, p. 13.]

14.Gunpowder:

Gunpowder was known and used in Kemet by the priests, but “solely for religious purposes at rites such as the Mysteries of Osiris.”21 [21 C. A. Diop, The African Origin of Civilization, p. 24.]

15.Glider plane:

A scale model of a glider, made of sycamore wood, survives from Kemet. It measures 18 cm x 14 cm, and is in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. The name of the maker of the model is Pa-di-Imen.22 [22 See Khalil Messiha et. al., “African experimental aeronautics: a 2,000-year-old model glider,” in Blacks in Science, pp. 92- 99.]

Aeronautical scientists have examined it and confirmed that it is a model glider. The date it was made is uncertain.

16.Atomic theory, heliocentricity, and gravitation:

There is evidence that these major theories of modern science were, long ago, known to Kemetic science. Isaac Newton left his written testimony about Kemetic knowledge thereof.23 [23 See John Pappademos, “The Newtonian synthesis in physical science and its roots in the Nile Valley,” Nile Valley Civilizations: 84-101, see especially p. 94 for quotes from Newton himself; and also Martin Bernal, Black Athena, Vol. I, p. 167.]

African In Egypt-Giving A Facelift To The African Image

Cheikh Anta Diop argued that “the moral fruit of [Egyptian] civilization is to be counted among the assets of the Black world. Instead of presenting itself to history as an insolvent debtor, that Black world is the very initiator of the ‘western’ civilization flaunted before our eyes today.” -- [Diop, The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality, p. xiv]

This essay presents a sampling of culture items (concepts, techniques, tools, symbols, artefacts, etc.) which the Greeks and Hebrews learned, borrowed or plagiarized from Black Egypt (Kemet) and passed on to modern Europe.

I: Science and Technology (contd.)

17.The oldest textbook on human anatomy:

According to Manetho, Teti, the second king of Dyn. I, was a physician and wrote a textbook on anatomy. [Alan Gardiner, Egypt of the Pharaohs, p. 430, n.3.]

18.The oldest extant work of systematic anatomy and manual of traumatic surgery:

The so-called Edwin Smith Papyrus, which dates from Dyn. XVIII, (ca. 16th c. BC), is a late copy of an Old Kingdom original. The advanced nature of the work may be indicated by some of what it contains: the internal anatomy of the head, a description of the external appearance of the brain, the meninges and their functions, the cerebrospinal fluid, the hippocampus.25 [25 Charles S. Finch III, “Science and symbol in Egyptian Medicine,” in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Egypt Revisited, pp.325-351.]

19.Pulse taking:

This was a technique of Kemetic medicine by Old Kingdom times, as evident in the Ebers and the Edwin Smith medical papyri.26 [26 Charles S. Finch III, “Science and symbol in Egyptian Medicine,” in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Egypt Revisited, p. 327.]

20.Bone setting techniques:

Some techniques, such as the methods for setting clavicular fractures and reducing a dislocated mandible, are described in the Edwin Smith papyrus.27 [27 Charles S. Finch III, “Science and symbol in Egyptian Medicine,” in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Egypt Revisited, p. 326.]

21. The clinical method:

The sequenced method in healing comprising of an examination, a diagnosis, a prognosis and a treatment was in use in Kemet by, at least, the time of the Edwin Smith Papyrus, 35 centuries before Hippocrates.28 [28 Charles S.

Finch III, “Science and symbol in Egyptian Medicine,” in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Egypt Revisited, p. 342]

22.The oldest known book on embalming:

This is The Book of What Pertains to Embalming which is cited as a reference in the Edwin Smith Papyrus.29 [29 Charles S. Finch III, “Science and symbol in Egyptian Medicine,” in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Egypt Revisited, p. 335.]

23.The Zodiac:

The zodiac probably goes back to predynastic times, to the period when the Kemetic calendars were invented. This is implicit in the Kemetic cycle of the Great Year of 25,868 years. Knowledge of the twelve ages of the zodiac gave rise to the changes of state symbolism and cults in Kemet, from the bull cult in the Age of the Bull (Taurus), during which Kemet was founded, to the ram cult in the Age of the Ram (Aries). An example of the schema of the zodiac was incorporated in the Temple of Het-her (Hathor to the Greeks) which was built ca. 100 BC to replace an earlier one, built ca. 1600 BC, on the same site.30 [30 Charles S. Finch, “The Kamitic genesis of Christianity”, in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Nile Valley Civilizations, pp. 182, 186.]

II:Religion and philosophy 24.The oldest religious texts:

The Pyramid texts of late Dynasty V and Dynasty VI (ca.3200-2956 BC) have been described as “the world’s oldest surviving corpus of religious and funerary writings.”31 [31 Encyclopaedia Britannica (1965) Vol. 18, p. 793 (B)]

25.The Oldest versions of the Creation Story:

These are versions of the Kemetic creation story. The Mennefer Recension (Memphite to the Greeks) dates to the Old Kingdom and probably to Dyn. I, to the time of Mena whose unification of the Two Lands to form Kemet is one of its themes. A copy of an Old Kingdom edition is on the Shabaka Stone (25th Dyn.); it was carved after an earlier copy, on papyrus or leather, was found to be worm- eaten.32 [32 Miriam Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature, Vol. I , p. 51.]

The Annu Recension is probably just as old or older. Fragments appear in the Pyramid Texts of the Old Kingdom, which were carved on tomb walls; they also appear in some papyrus texts, such as the Bremmer Rhind Papyrus.33 [33 See Theophile Obenga, in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Egypt Revisited, p. 304.]

The doctrine of creation by the word of the first of the gods is part of the Kemetic cosmogony, as is evident in the Mennefer Recension where it is said that

“it (the heart) is what makes it possible for every conceived thing to come out, and it is the tongue which repeats what has been thought in the heart. Thus all the gods, Atum and his Ennead were created. For all divine speech came forth through what the heart thought and what the tongue commanded.”34[34 See Theophile Obenga, in Ivan Van Sertima ed., Egypt Revisited, p. 311. ]

That was the Kemetic antecedent for “And God said, let there be light” of the Old Testament, and for the “In the beginning was the word . . .” of the New Testament.

26.The doctrine of the Resurrection and Eternal Life after Death:

This complex of doctrines includes the judgement of the soul of the dead before the god Ausar, the resurrection of the soul, the reunion of body and soul, the ascension into heaven, and life everlasting among the gods in the fields of paradise. It is a central part of Kemetic religion, and is based on the story of the suffering, mutilation and death of Ausar (Osiris to the Greeks) at the hands of his rival Set (Satan to the Christians), and the subsequent resurrection of his transformed and glorified body.

Though most probably Predynastic in origin, its oldest recension is the Annu Recension, as compiled by the College of Priests at Annu (the Annu or Ani of the Egyptologists/the Heliopolis of the Greeks/the On of the Hebrews) and carved on the walls of the Pyramid of Unas, the last Pharaoh of the 5th Dynasty.

Other recensions include the Recension of Waset (Thebes to the Greeks), which was compiled into the book Per em Hru, (a work whose title properly translates as The Book of Coming Forth by Day, or as The Book of Resurrection, rather than as The Egyptian Book of the Dead). The Waset Recension is preserved in papyrus copies from the 18th Dynasty: e.g. the Papyrus of Ani. It is a guide book for the soul on its way to resurrection.35 [35 For the Pyramid Texts (excerpts) see Miriam Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature, Vol. I,; and for the Papyrus of Ani, see E. A. Wallis Budge, The Egyptian Book of the Dead, particularly the chapters of the introduction that discuss ‘The Legend of Osiris’ and ‘The Doctrine of Eternal Life’.]

27.The Trinity:

Some of the trinities (triads of gods) in Kemetic religion are:

a) Ausar-Ise-Heru (the Osiris-Isis-Horus of the Greeks) – the Great Triad of Abtu (Abydos to the Greeks)

b) Amen-Mut-Khensu (the Amon, Mut and Chons of the Greeks) -- the Great Triad of Waset (Thebes to the Greeks)36 [36 E. A. Wallis Budge, The Gods of the Egyptians, Vol. II, p. 33.]

However,

c) Ra, Shu and Tefnut were “the first divine trinity in the history of religion.” The first god, Ra, when he spat out Shu and coughed up Tefnut, declared: “I was one; I became three”!37 [37 C.A. Diop, Civilization or Barbarism, p. 342.]

Whereas ( c ) is a trinity formed by an uncreated god and the two gods created by him, ( a ) and ( b) are Husband-Wife-Son families of gods. These Kemetic trinities were the antecedents for the Christian Trinity of God the father, God the son and God the Holy Spirit.

28. The Madonna and Child (The Venerated symbol of Motherhood):

Black Madonna) was the most popular cult in the entire Roman empire before the Christian emperors suppressed all non-Christian cults in the early 6th century AD 38 [38 Danita Redd, “Black Madonnas of Europe,” in Van Sertima, ed., African Presence in Early Europe, New Brunswick: Transaction Books, 1985, pp. 108- 133. ]

Rehabilitating the self-image of the Black African (3)

Having exhaustively demonstrated that the Pharaonic Egyptians were black, Senegalese scholar Cheikh Anta Diop argued that “the moral fruit of [Egyptian] civilization is to be counted among the assets of the Black world. Instead of presenting itself to history as an insolvent debtor, that Black world is the very initiator of the ‘western’ civilization flaunted before our eyes today.” -- [Diop, The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality, p. xiv]

This essay presents a sampling of culture items (concepts, techniques, tools, symbols, artefacts, etc.) which the Greeks and Hebrews learned, borrowed or plagiarized from Black Egypt (Kemet) and passed on to modern Europe.

II:Religion and philosophy (contd.)

29.The benefit of dying in the holy city:

It was said of Waset, the holy city, that to die there was to earn a place in paradise; a claim made much later for Mecca by the Islamic religion. A 19th Dynasty papyrus said: “Happy is he who comes to die at Waset, the abode of Maat, the place of Silence. . . . Happiness to him who comes to die here! He will be a divine soul!”39 [39 See Asa G. Hilliard III, “Waset, the Eye of Ra and the Abode of Maat,” in Ivan van Sertima, ed., Egypt Revisited, p.211.]

30.Immaculate Conception:

The immaculate conception of the Apis Bull was part of Kemetic religion. The Apis Bull was a god which periodically became incarnate among the Kemites in the form of a calf born through immaculate conception. According to Herodotus, “the Egyptian belief is that a flash of light descends upon the cow from heaven, and this causes her to conceive Apis.”40 [40 Herodotus, The Histories, Penguin Classics (1996 revised edition), p. 165.]

Here we find the precedent for the Christian doctrine of the immaculate conception of the Virgin Mary by the Holy Ghost.

31.The Virgin Mother:

The Virgin Ise, mother of Heru the imperfect, imperfect because he is born of the mother only, without the participation of a father.41 [41 Charles S. Finch, “The Kamitic genesis of Christianity”, in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Nile Valley Civilizations, p. 181.]

Here we find the precedent for the Virgin Mary, mother of Jesus who was born of the mother only, without participation by his putative father Joseph.

32.The doctrine of the Son of God:

The doctrine that the Pharaoh is the son of Re (Re-Atum), the Sun god, became an established part of Kemetic theology of the state by the end of Dyn. V. [ca. 3094 BC] when it was presented in the Pyramid Texts of Unas.42[42 Wayne B. Chandler, “Of gods and men: Egypt’s old kingdom,” in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Egypt Revisited, p. 168; Miriam Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature, Vol. I, pp.30-32 ]

33.The Nativity of the Pharaoh:

The nativity of the Pharaoh--the annunciation, conception, birth and adoration of the child pharaoh--was one of the two central pillars of the royal ideology of the Kemetic state. The other was resurrection and ascension of his spirit into heaven to join the other gods in paradise. The four stages of the nativity of the Pharaoh, as depicted on a Kemetic temple wall more than a millennium before the invention of Christianity, are the precedent for the nativity of Jesus. According to Charles Finch,

Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Nile Valley Civilizations, pp. 181-182; and Fig. 1 on p. 180]

“In the Temple of Amen at Luxor, there is a group of four vignettes depicting the birth of the infant pharaoh, who as the god-king or divine king is an avatar of Horus. In the first scene, Thoth, the announcer and messenger of the gods, proclaims to the royal mother the impending birth of a son who is descended from the god Amen and will reign as the divine king. In the first chapter of Luke, verses 26-38, the messenger angel Gabriel announces to Mary the impending birth of a divine king, the Son of God. In the second scene of Luxor, the god Kneph, who personifies Breath as Spirit, hold the ankh, the symbol of life, to the mouth of the royal mother, indicating that she is conceiving by the power of Spirit. In the Gospel of Matthew, Mary is made pregnant by the ‘power of the Holy Spirit.’ In the third scene at Luxor, the divine child is born corresponding to the birth of the divine child at Bethlehem. In the final scene at Luxor, the gods gather around the infant to praise and adore him. In the second chapter of Luke, verses 13-14, the heavenly hosts gather above the infant Jesus to praise and

34.The Krst/Karast and the Mesia/Messiah:

In Kemetic mortuary rites, the Krst was the anointed mummy which was identified with the resurrected Ausar. The Mesia, i.e. Mes-ia, was the reborn, the chief prince, the son of Ia. Here we find the origins of the Greek term Kristos and Hebrew term Messiah of Christianity.44 [44 Charles S. Finch, “The Kamitic genesis of Christianity”, in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Nile Valley Civilizations, pp. 193-194.]

35.The Virgin Birth:

The doctrine that Heru was born of the virgin was symbolic of the astronomical fact that the birthday of Heru, in his solar aspect, was December 25, the day the sun begins its ascent towards its zenith at the summer solstice on June 21st. During the zodiac Age of Aries, 2410-255 BC, the constellation Virgo, “the Virgin,” was on the eastern horizon on December 25 when the sun rose, hence the sun, and therefore Heru in his solar aspect, was said to be “born of the virgin.”45 [45 Charles S. Finch, “The Kamitic genesis of Christianity”, in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Nile Valley Civilizations, p. 183.]

This birthday, with its symbolism and metaphor, was adopted by the founders of Christianity and transferred to Jesus.

36.Set/Set-an:

Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Nile Valley Civilizations, pp. 181-182; and Fig. 1 on p. 180]

In the Ausarean drama of Kemetic religion, Set was the adversary and destroyer of Ausar. In Christian theology, Set appears as Satan, the evil one, the

34.The Krst/Karast and the Mesia/Messiah:

In Kemetic mortuary rites, the Krst was the anointed mummy which was identified with the resurrected Ausar. The Mesia, i.e. Mes-ia, was the reborn, the chief prince, the son of Ia. Here we find the origins of the Greek term Kristos and Hebrew term Messiah of Christianity.44 [44 Charles S. Finch, “The Kamitic genesis of Christianity”, in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Nile Valley Civilizations, pp. 193-194.]

35.The Virgin Birth:

The doctrine that Heru was born of the virgin was symbolic of the astronomical fact that the birthday of Heru, in his solar aspect, was December 25, the day the sun begins its ascent towards its zenith at the summer solstice on June 21st. During the zodiac Age of Aries, 2410-255 BC, the constellation Virgo, “the Virgin,” was on the eastern horizon on December 25 when the sun rose, hence the sun, and therefore Heru in his solar aspect, was said to be “born of the virgin.”45 [45 Charles S. Finch, “The Kamitic genesis of Christianity”, in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Nile Valley Civilizations, p. 183.]

This birthday, with its symbolism and metaphor, was adopted by the founders of Christianity and transferred to Jesus.

36.Set/Set-an:

adversary of God.46 [46 Charles S. Finch, “The Kamitic genesis of Christianity”, in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Nile Valley Civilizations, pp. 181, 197.]

37.Judgment Day:

The doctrine of judgment day, when the soul of the dead is examined, and rewarded or punished by the assembly of the gods, is the centerpiece of the Kemetic resurrection drama. It constitutes the famous chapter 125 of the Wasetian Recension of the Kemetic Book of the Resurrection (alias the Egyptian Book of the Dead).

38.Paradise, Hell and Purgatory:

In Kemetic cosmography, Tuat was the abode of the dead. Some parts of the Tuat were populated by monsters and fiends, including serpents, scorpions and winged monsters, and the darkness was so thick that it was palpable. Another part of the Tuat was the Seket-Aanru, the abode of Ausar, where the vindicated and beatified souls lived a peaceful life of plenty and enjoyed an abundance of good food of all kinds.47 [47 Wallis Budge, Egyptian Book of the Dead, pp. cxxx and cxxxvi.] The part of the Tuat populated by serpents and monsters and jailers stoking the flames that will consume the unvindicated soul is depicted on the walls of the tomb of Seti I of Dyn. XIX. (ca. 1300 BC).48 [48 C. A. Diop, Civilization or Barbarism, p. 332, Fig. 75.]

In the story of Setne Khamwas and Si-Osire, in the seventh hall, “Setne saw the mysterious form of Osiris, the great god, seated on his throne of

fine gold, crowned with the atef-crown. Anubis, the great god, was on his left, the great god Thoth was on his right, and the gods of the tribunal of the inhabitants of the netherworld stood on his left and right. The balance stood in the center before them, and they weighed the good deeds against the misdeeds, Thoth, the great god, writing, while Anubis gave the information to his colleague. He who would be found to have more misdeeds than good deeds is handed over to the Devourer, who belongs to the lord of the netherworld. His ba is destroyed together with his body, and he is not allowed to breathe ever again. He who would be found to have more good deeds than misdeeds is taken in among the gods of the tribunal of the lord of the netherworld, while his ba goes to the sky together with the august spirits. He who would be found to have good deeds equal to his misdeeds is taken in among the excellent spirits who serve Sokar- Osiris.” 49 [49 Miriam Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature, Vol. III, p. 140.]

The three regions of the Tuat, to one of which the soul of the deceased may be sent, are the Kemetic precedents for the much later Christian paradise, hell and purgatory. The Seket-Aanru is the model for the Elysian Fields of the Greeks.50 [50 C. A. Diop, Civilization or Barbarism, p. 331; Budge, The Egyptian Book of the Dead, p. cxxxvi.]


Having exhaustively demonstrated that the Pharaonic Egyptians were black, Senegalese scholar Cheikh Anta Diop argued that “the moral fruit of [Egyptian] civilization is to be counted among the assets of the Black world. Instead of presenting itself to history as an insolvent debtor, that Black world is the very initiator of the ‘western’ civilization flaunted before our eyes today.” -- [Diop, The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality, p. xiv]

This essay presents a sampling of culture items (concepts, techniques, tools, symbols, artefacts, etc.) which the Greeks and Hebrews learned, borrowed or plagiarized from Black Egypt (Kemet) and passed on to modern Europe.

III: Miscellenous – literature, arts, symbols, games, etc.

39.The earliest known recorded event:

A description, on a Predynastic storage jar from Qustul, of a conflict between Ta-Seti and Nekhen, some five generations or more before Mena’s unification of Kemet, i.e. ca. 4600 BC. 51 [51 Bruce Williams, “Lost Pharaohs of Nubia” in Van Sertima ed., Egypt Revisited, p. 103.]

40.The world’s oldest historical text:

A book of annals of the Pharaohs carved in stone, now existing in fragments the principal one of which is in Palermo, Italy, and is called The Palermo Stone by Egyptologists. Some other fragments are in the Cairo Museum. It dates from the 5th Dynasty.52


[52 Alan Gardiner, Egypt of the Pharaohs, pp. 62-64.]

41.The Oldest Book of Wisdom in the World:

The Instructions of Ptahhotep, a work by a 5th Dyn. Vizier/chief minister. A Middle Kingdom copy exists on the Papyrus Prisse in Paris.53 [53 Miriam Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature, Vol I, p. 61.]

42.The oldest documented Foundation:

An endowment of estates to a temple of Knum by Pharaoh Djoser in the 3rd Dynasty.54[54 Miriam Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature, Vol. III, pp. 94- 100.] A copy of the document was made on a granite rockface at the first cataract.

43.The oldest surviving charter granting tax exemption:

Pepi I’s charter for his mother’s chapel, from Dyn. VI.55 [55 Miriam Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature, Vol. I, p. 28.]

44.The oldest Illuminated (i.e. color illustrated) Manuscripts:

Papyri of the 18th Dynasty, e.g. the Papyrus of Ani, containing texts as well as vignettes and borders in bright colors such as reds, greens, yellows and white. Some are of considerable length, from 20 to 90 feet, and 14 to 18 inches wide.56 [56 E. A. Wallis Budge, Egyptian Book of the Dead, pp. xxviii, cxlv.]


45.The Blindfold of Justice:

Maat, the personification of Justice, Truth and Righteousness “is sometimes represented blind-fold”.57 [57 Budge, Egyptian Book of the Dead., p. 246, n. 5; and the introduction for discussion of the probable predynastic origins of the Resurrection concepts and rites in which the scales and blindfold appear.] The practice most probably dates back to Predynastic times when the doctrine of Judgment Day was established.

46.The Caduceus (Staff with entwined snake as symbol of healing):

It was the staff of Tehuti in his role as the God of Medicine.

“The snake was a potent symbol of renewal and resurrection because of its ability to slough old skin for new. This made it one of the earliest healing types.” - - Charles Finch58 [58 Charles Finch, “Imhotep the Physician: Archetype of the Great Man”, in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Great Black Leaders: Ancient and Modern, p. 225. See illustration on p. 227 for the serpent-twined staff in Tehuti’s hand.]

In Kemetic iconography, Tehuti is represented with a serpent-entwined staff in his hand. This, like most iconography of the most ancient Kemetic gods, probably dates back to Predynastic times.

47.The Star of Creation:

of David). One triangle pointing up reflecting the ascent into spirit, and one triangle pointing down representing the descent into matter. Known by the Egyptians as the star of creation, it also embodies the axiom ‘as above, so below’. That which we see in our solar or macro system with the Sun as its center and the several planets which orbit around it, we also see in the micro system or cosm in the minute atom . . .59[59 Wayne Chandler, “Of Gods and Men: Egypt’s Old Kingdom”, in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Egypt Revisited, New Brunswick: Transaction Books, 1989, p. 153.]

This six-pointed star was, originally, the Kemetic symbol of the cosmic symmetry in the universe between the solar and stellar realms above, and the terrestrial and sub-terrestrial realms below. It was called the star of creation. It was adopted by the Jews as their symbol only in the last few centuries. It was “the Hermetic symbol of the interlaced triangles (now erroneously called the star

And according to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, “The symbol -- which historically was not limited to use by the Jews -- originated in antiquity when, side by side with the five-pointed star, it served as a magical sign or as a decoration. . . . The Jewish community of Prague was the first to use the Star of David as its official symbol, and from the 17th century on, the six-pointed star became the official seal of many Jewish communities and a general sign of Judaism, though it has no biblical or Talmudic authority.60 [60 Encyclopaedia Britannica, 15th Edition, Micropaedia, Vol. 3, 1993, p. 911.]

48.The game of checkers/draughts:

Predynastic boards and pieces for the game of checkers have been found by archeologists.61 [61 John A. Wilson, The Culture of Ancient Egypt, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1956, pp. 26-27.]


III: Miscellenous – literature, arts, symbols, games, etc.

49.Literary themes:

Some of the famous themes in Greek and Christian literature have precedents in Kemetic stories. For example, in the story of Setne Khamwas and Si-Osire the following are found:

the afterlife;

reach.

(a) The rich man and poor man who have their fortunes reversed in

(b) The visit to the underworld by a living person led by a guide; (c) The torture wherein the desired food or drink hangs just out of

The rich man and poor man theme later appears in Luke 16:19-31. The guided visit to the underworld later appears in the stories of Orpheus and of Odysseus and, much much later, in Dante’s Divine Comedy.

The Greek story of Tantalus includes the torture wherein the water and the fruits he craves always recede just beyond his reach.

Setne Khamwas lived in Dyn. XIX, in the 13th century BC, long before the dates for Jesus and the New Testament, and long before Hesiod and Homer and the rise of Greek literature, in which these themes reappear.


V: Greek plagiarism in science and philosophy

This occurred wholesale, and was done by practically all of the great Greek thinkers—from Thales and Pythagoras all the way down to Plato, Aristotle and Archimedes. For three centuries before Alexander conquered Kemet, Greeks made a habit of going to Kemet to study, and upon their return home, presenting as their own discoveries and inventions what they had been taught by the priests of Kemet.

After Kemet fell under Greek rule, Greeks settled in Alexandria and turned it into their headquarters for grand plagiarism. They took over control of the accumulated knowledge of Kemet, and studied and reproduced them, and passed them off as Greek works. Thus, the period from 600 BC to 200 AD, the alleged great age of Greek science and philosophy, was actually the Great Age of Greek Plagiarism This misbehavior was noted and condemned at the time by some Greeks, most notably by Clement of Alexandria, who, because of this rampant plagiarism, said that “a one thousand page book will not be long enough to cite the names of my fellow countrymen who have used and abused the Egyptian science.”71 [71 Quoted in C. A. Diop, “Africa’s Contribution to World Civilization: The Exact Sciences”, in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Great African Thinkers, p. 87, n. 13.]


Documentation of some of these plagiarisms has been made in the 20th century, most notably by George G. M James in Stolen Legacy, and by Cheikh Anta Diop.72 [72 See C. A. Diop “Africa’s Contribution to World Civilization: The Exact Sciences”, in Ivan Van Sertima, ed., Great African Thinkers, pp.74-88, and C. A.

Diop, Civilization or Barbarism, chaps 16 and 17.]


Mathematics: Euclidean geometry, “Pythagorean” theorem Mensuration: Formulae for the area of a sphere S = 4πR2;

Volume of a cylinder of height h:V = πR2h The Papyrus of Moscow and the Rhind Papyrus “show us that the

Egyptians, two thousand years before the Greeks, studied the mathematics of the pyramid and of the cone, and that they even used the different trigonometric lines, the tangent, the sine, the cosine, the cotangent, in order to calculate their slopes. This would not keep Archimedes from writing to the geometrician Dasitheus that it is ‘Eudoxus of Cnidus to whom we owe the measurement of the pyramid and of the cone.’ Furthermore, Eudoxus and Plato were former pupils of the Egyptian priests at Heliopolis, but as the documents prove, the Egyptians had already proceeded, two thousand years before the birth of these two, with the study that is attributed to them.”—Diop, Civilization or Barbarism, p. 237

“This definition of the ‘double remen’ by itself, and its mathematical implications, clearly show that Pythagoras was neither the inventor of irrational numbers (incommensurability of the diagonal and of the side of the square) nor of the theorem that bears his name: he took all these elements from Egypt where he had been, as reported by his biographers (cf. Jamblichus), a pupil of the priests for twenty-two years”—[Diop, Civilization or Barbarism, p.260]

Dr. John Henrik Clarke - Current Statehood (Speaks on Black Economic

The Wretched of the Earth Hardcover by Frantz Fanon

Africans Should Must Never Forget

The Importance and Necessity of Building Nationhood and People-hood, Self Respect and Dignity

Africans need to rebuild their emaciated nations from the vicissitudes of Colonialism, Imperialism and neocolonial orders. Indeed, there are many paths to national liberation for the oppressed, but it is of utmost importance to pay attention to one little detail: Women's issues. for this part, I will defer to Thomas Sankara who astutely and cogently states:

"Political Orientation: Women's Issues

"The weight of the centuries-old traditions of our society has relegated women to the rank of beasts of burden. women suffer doubly from all the scourges of neocolonial society. First, they experience the same suffering as men. Second, they are subjected too additional suffering by men.

"Our revolution is in the interests of all the oppressed and all those who are exploited in today's society. It is therefore in the interests of women, since the basis of their domination by men lies in the way society's system of political and economic life is organized. By changing the social order that oppresses women, the revolution creates the conditions for their genuine emancipation.

"The women and men of our society are all victims of imperialist oppression and domination. that is why they wage the same struggle. The revolution and women's revolution go together. We do not talk of women's emancipation as a act of charity or because of a surge of human compassion.It is a basic necessity for the triumph of the revolution. "Women hold up the other half of the sky".

"Up until now, women have been excluded from the realm of decision making. the revolution, by entrusting responsibilities to women, is creating conditions for turning loose their fighting initiative. Women will be an integral part of all the battles we still have to wage against the various shackles of 'neocolonial" society and for the construction of a new society.

"They will take part in all levels of organization of the life of the nation as a whole, from conceiving projects to making decisions and implementing them. The final goal of this great undertaking is to build a free and prosperous society in which women will be equal to men in all domains."

I have written a bit lengthy article about the rape as a weapon against south African African women, wherein I was addressing a very pertinent and urgent issue that has beleaguered women unabated. This is a very important and serious issue because All of us have a mothers and sisters, and would not want this scourge to befall them at any time. I will post my article in order to make a point that Sankara points out to in his piece above that women are holding half of the sky in their struggle for the liberation of their people..

I also want to take a brief look at the Mental disorders that are as a result of Apartheid below.

"Present-Day Colonial War Mental Disorders..

Too Many People Present Symptoms Of Mental Disorders, Today...

Having taken a serious look at the state of mental health disorders in South Africa today, one cannot help but revisit Frantz Fanon's book, "The Wretched Of The Earth," and utilize his observations of his after effects phenomena presenting as Mental illness from the ravages and vicissitudes of Apartheid, and its hangover (Setlamama/Babalazi)-plus the inept rulers of the ANC-led government. At the writing of this article, there is rampant "Colonial" War that very often takes on the aspect of a genuine "genocide", this War which radically disrupts and shatters the world, which is in fact the triggering situation." Fanon's aim in this case above was to "demonstrate that any torture deeply dislocates, as might be expected, the personality of the tortured." The oppressed foist upon themselves the alienation of their selves-presenting an opportunity for all and sundry to do as they like to us, including ourselves-helping them along.

The Personality of the Africans in Mzantsi has been 'dislocated' and their 'Personality' tortured, severely and long term. As pointed out by Fanon, "This 'colonial War' is a phenomenon that produces a very debilitating mental state" that this article is concerned with, albeit, brief.

Fanon informs us that these disorders, produce a pathological process which is"crudely frequently malignant.
' .. These disorders wage a massive attack on the ego, and almost invariably leave behind a vulnerability virtually visible to the naked eye. In all evidence, the future of these patients is comprised."

The point above is worth keeping in mind as we unfurl the present-day reality of mental sickness enveloping the peoples of Mzantsi because of the pervasive and widespread cases of craziness or madness that are now commonplace.

As one wades through the cases presented by Fanon of the effects and affects of their war against the French and what it portended, whilst the one in South African is having people with similar symptoms- is one way Africans can use to learn about their wretched condition and how to better deal with it.
One of the most debilitating and devastating weapons used today in Mzantsi is RAPE. It has been announced on the radio, TV stats that South Africa leads the world in the number of Rapes occurring there. This has been reported for many years, to date, and it is now worse off than before.

Shenika Rountree wrote this article:

"The Problem of Rape in South Africa"

South Africa has the highest incidence of rape in the world. The statistics are chilling: one in two women are raped; women are more likely to be raped than to learn to read. For every 25 men accused of rape in South African 24 walk free, making the act of pressing charges almost useless. The term corrective rape was coined in the early 2000’s by human rights activist to describe the criminal act of a man forcing himself on a lesbian woman believing it will change her sexual orientation. Children are among the highest growing demographic of rape victims. Sexual violence towards children, including infants has increased over 400% in the last decade. It is said that practices such as gang rape; child rape and corrective rape are common because they are considered a form of male bonding and dominance

The effects of rape on a woman are destructive to her emotional and physical health. Rape of a young girl can cause everything from internal injury to death. The rape of children often comes from the misguided belief that sex with a child will cure AID’s. Along with the risk of permanent emotional distress rape victims also run a high risk of contracting HIV from their attackers. The rate of HIV in South Africa runs rampant with nearly 20% of the population facing the disease. These women not only face rape but the possibility of a deadly disease to constantly remind them of the terrible event.

The president of South Africa himself is an accused rapist. Jacob Zuma, who was elected President in 2009, was tried and acquitted of raping an HIV-positive woman. He was acquitted because he told the court that the woman had dressed provocatively according to the traditional standard and that it was against Zulu culture for a man to leave a sexually aroused woman unsatisfied. He was aware of her HIV status and had unprotected sex with her anyway. He stated that he showered afterward to “cut the risk” of transmission. This is the same man that headed the National AIDS council in his country. The leader of the country set a dangerous and irresponsible example for the men of his country to follow.

The police of South Africa do little to deter or to educate men on the damage of rape. Men can get as little as five years in prison for raping a women and when they are found guilty of rape crimes and can serve as little as a fourth of their sentence if found guilty. Many times rapes are committed alongside murder. The most notorious case came in 2008 when South African football celebrity Eudy Simelane an openly gay GLBT activist was gang raped and murdered. Days before her murder she had been receiving death threats because of her sexuality. She often told stories to her support groups about how she had to fight off the men attempting to rape her as a teenager to correct her homosexuality. After being raped she was stabbed 25 times and left to die in a ditch. Of the 5 men who committed the crime only two were convicted of rape. The other three men are on bail avoiding prison through years of case continuances.

I feel that Eudy Simelane’s celebrity could have been used to highlight rape and murder as the major issue it is. It would have been an amazing learning opportunity but because of South Africa’s desensitization to the issue of rape the story was neither shocking nor did it stir up any feelings among the community. Women should be provided a safe haven to be themselves. There should be more outlets for women to protect themselves.

Rape is a scary issue that cannot be denied. As a whole this country has a devastating rape epidemic. A recent study found that more than a quarter of men admitted to having raped a woman and of those 46% had committed a rape more than one time. The study, conducted by South Africa’s Medical Research Council, reveals a deeply rooted culture of violence against women, in which men rape in order to feel powerful, and do so with impunity, believing that their superiority entitles them to vent their frustrations on women and children. The men most likely to rape, the researchers found, were not the poorest, but those who had attained some level of education and income

The placement of blame lies in the cultural perception of rape. Rape is seen as commonplace and acceptable. These cultural biases make it nearly impossible to curb the rate of rape and prosecute those who commit these heinous acts. No women should have to live in fear that her life is in danger because of her sexuality. With the high rate of HIV in South Africa I am astonished that rape of innocent women is not a larger issue. Having the highest rate of rape in the world along with one the highest rates of new HIV cases every year should be enough for the government to stop and pay attention to the issue of rape. Young women with full lives ahead of them are being raped and infected with a deadly disease all due to their vulnerability. The lives of the women in South Africa being raped mirror an image of women throughout history fighting for equality under a system that gives men the privileged ownership over women’s bodies. The publicizing of the rape crisis in South Africa should help bring the attention of international activists to this problem. The women of South Africa need help and support as they work toward finding solutions and empowerment."

From a personal perspective, Rape in our Township is even more perplexing and disempowering. There past week, three women in our streets escaped raped when they were accosted by young men, four of them, of who had one pointing the gun at the woman, the second man had his hand clasped around the woman's mouth, the third man held the hands and gripping, viciously, the hair of the female victims, whilst the fourth one would literally tear and shred the clothes of the captured victims. In all the three cases, the women escaped because there were lights from a car or an oncoming car,, scared off the would-be rapist, who scampered away with the women's cell phones and their bags.
It is now in the news of the teen girl in the Cape who was raped and had her intestines disemboweled , whilst she was still alive , and after the rape, and was left for dead. It seems that those who found her, were able to get the names of her assailants before she died.
Grandma's, infants, boys and dogs and other animals have been reportedly been raped. The was a court case I just heard of this young adult man who was taken to court by the owner of the dog, who alleged the accused had too many sexual encounters with his dog, that in the end it died. And all this I am talking about above, can be found in the Sowetan and other Newspapers, and by word of mouth or meeting the actual victims, and this is during the time and rule of ANC-led government

Colonialists Using Rape As A Weapon..

During the Apartheid era, powerful and unknown African women were viciously raped and in some cases Alsatian dogs were used for this despicable act against women(and some are still alive with serious mental disorders that are incurable). Before I delve deeper into this issue of Rape of African women in South Africa, I would like to cite a case as told by Fanon in the following manner"

"Africans Presenting Clearly Defined Symptoms Of Severe Reactive Disorders"...

"Impotence In An Algerian The Rape of His Wife"

"B--" is a twenty-six-year-old man. He has been referred to us by the medical Services of the National Liberation Front for persistent migraines and insomnia. A former taxi driver, he has been a militant in the nationalist parties since the age of eighteen. In 1955 he became a member of an FLN (Front de Liberation Nationale) unit. On several occasions he used his taxi to carry leaflets and political leaders. Confronted with a widening crackdown. the FLN decided to wage war in the urban centers; "B--" was then assigned to driving commandos close to the points of attack, and fairly often having to wait for them.

"On day, however, right in the middle of the European sector, following a fairly extensive commando raid, the sector was sealed-off, forcing him to abandon his taxi and compelling the commando unit to break up and disperse. "B--", who managed to escape the enemy surveillance, took refuge at a friend's house, and a few days later, on orders from his superiors, went underground to join the nearest resistance unit without ever going home.

"For several months he went without news of his wife and his twenty-month-old daughter. He did learn, however,that the police had been looking for him for weeks in the city. After two years in the resistance movement he received a message from his wife asking him to forget her. She had brought shame on herself. He must no longer think of coming back to live with her. Extremely worried, he requested permission from his commander to make a secret trip back home. It was refused. However, steps were taken for a member of the FLN to contact "B--'s" wife and parents. Two weeks later a detailed report reached the commander of "A--'s" unit.

She was interrogated about the company her husband kept and slapped fairly violently for two days. On the third day, a French soldier - she was unable to say whether he was an officer - ordered the others out and 'raped' her. Shortly afterward, a second soldier, this time in the presence of others, 'raped' her, telling her" "If you ever see that bastard your husband again, don't you forget to tell him what we did to you. she remained another week without undergoing further interrogation. She was then escorted home. When she told her story to her mother, the latter convinced her to tell "B--" everything. So, as soon as her husband got in touch with her again, she confessed her disgrace.

Once the initial shock was over, "B--" soon recovered by devoting every minute of his life to the cause. for several months he took reports from Algerian women who had been tortured or 'raped'; he had the opportunity of meeting with the husbands of abused women and his personal misfortune, hi dignity as an injured husband took second place.

"In 1958 he was assigned to a mission abroad. Jut before rejoining his unit an unusual distraction and insomnia worried his comrades and his superiors. His departure was delayed and a medical examination ordered. this was when he was referred to us. Our first impression was good. A lively face, a bit too lively perhaps. His smile was slightly forced, his exuberance superficial: "I'm okay ... I'm okay. I feel better now. Give me a fortifier, some vitamins, and let me go bak." He was obviously anxious deep down. He was immediately hospitalized.

"On the second day the smoke screen of optimism vanished and we had on our hands a bedridden anorexic suffering from melancholic depression. He avoided any political discussion and manifested a marked disinterest for anything concerning the national struggle. He avoided listening to news about the war of liberation. Identifying his problems was extremely laborious, but after several days we managed to reconstruct his story:

"During his stay abroad he had tried to have sexual intercourse, but failed. Thinking it was merely fatigue, normal after forced marches and and periods of malnutrition, he tried again two weeks later and failed again. spoke to a comrade about it who advised him to take vitamin B12. Took it in tablet form. New attempt, new failure. Furthermore, a few moments before the act he had an irresistible impulse to tear up a photo of his little girl. Such a symbolic connection could raise the possibility of unconscious incestuous drives. However, several conversations and a dream in which the patient witnessed the rapid putrefying of a kitten giving off a nauseating smell, led us in a completely new direction.

"S--", another character, as he was diagnosed had his case presented in this manner:

"... He began by telling us he was not dead and he had played a trick on others. Gradually, we managed to reconstruct the story of his failed assassination attempts. "S--" is not anxious, but overexcited with violent mood swings and shouting. He did not break anything, but wore everyone out by his constant chatter and the Service was on permanent alert because of his declared intention to "kill everybody."

"During his hospitalization he would attack roughly eight patients, with makeshift weapons. The nurses and doctors were not spared either. We even wondered whether we were not facing one of those latent forms of epilepsy characterized by a general aggressiveness that was almost constantly on edge.

"We started narcotherapy. After the third day a daily cross-examination allowed us to better understand the dynamics of the pathological process. His intellectual confusion gradually cleared up. The following extracts from the patient's:

"God is with me ... but he can't have been with those who died. ... I was damn lucky. ... In life, it's kill or be killed. ... There are some French among us. ... They disguised as Arabs. ... They've all got be killed. ... Give me a machine gun. All these so-called Algerians are French. ... and they won't leave me alone. As soon as I try and get some sleep, they come into room. but now I know what they're up to. Everyone want to kill me. But I'll fight back. I'll kill them all, everyone of them. I'll slit their throats, one after the other, and yours as well. You all want to take me out, but you'll have to think of other ways. Killing you won't affect me in the slightest. The little ones, the grown-up, the women. the children,the dogs, the birds, the donkeys. ... nobody will be spared. ... Afterwards, I'll be able to sleep in peace"

"All this was said in fits and starts and he remained hostile, aloof and scornful. After three weeks his agitated state disappeared, but there was a disinclination to communicate and a tendency to keep to himself, which made us fear the worst.

Women And African People's Revolution

To this issue, Sankara informs us thusly

"However, we need a correct understanding of the question of women's emancipation. It does not dignify a mechanical equality between men and women. It doe not mean acquiring habits similar to those of men, such as drinking, smoking, and wearing trousers[Although I personally, as the author of this Hub, think that women should wear trousers if they so wish]. Nor will acquiring diplomas make women equal to men or more emancipated. A diploma is not a passport to emancipation.

"The genuine emancipation of women is that which entrusts responsibilities to them and involves them in productive activity and in the different struggles the people face. women's genuine emancipation is one that exacts men's respect and consideration. Emancipation, like freedom, is not granted but conquered. It is for women themselves to put forward their demands and mobilize to win them

These cases cited above by Frantz Fanon, Sankara, and the article I have cited above by Shenika Rountree, complement one another and can be found amongst the depressed, repressed, oppressed, poverty stricken and disease ridden poor masses of Africans, have their symptoms manifest themselves, for a brutal "Nazi" style violence perpetuated upon them by the Apartheid regime, and now at present, the gendarme, turncoat and quisling ANC-led government which has betrayed the voting polity at all turns during their governance since 1994, to date.

So, we see The effects of torture, murders, rapes, depression, Impotence, both physiological, coil, political, economical and psychological manifestations thereof. Paranoid schizophrenia and delusions of grandeur and the rise in suicidal behaviors and actions are now the norm and our mores in our collectives. Wilson informs us:

"Amnesia":

"Those people ad parents who have escaped their own history as a result of trying to escape anxiety, fear, shame and so forth, may pass "escapism" onto their children as history. That history of escapism then becomes a part of their personality and they become vulnerable to addictions and all kinds of terrible habits and orientations in the world. Why do you think we were robbed of our history it it was not to serve this purpose?

"The individual who has amnesia suffers distortion of and blindness to reality. The individual who cuts himself from off from his history is self-alienated. there's a whole part of himself that's completely shut-off from his use. It's a if there were tow parts. One part is unknown, yet because it is unknown doesn't mean that it i not effective"We have to devote energy to unknowing". We have to direct perception to unknowing. We have to say: "Let me turn my face so I cannot see; let me not think about it." So the struggle to know itself becomes a creator of behavior and personality structure. So, the idea that not knowing one's history somehow permits one to escape it is a lie. In fact, it brings one under the domination of the more pernicious effects of that history and opens the personality up for self-alienation, self-destruction.

"A person suffering from amnesia lives a life based on negation, not affirmation, not on growth and development, but lives life in such a way as to deny life and reality and to deny parts of his own personality and himself. Life then becomes a negation and is used to maintain a negation instead of life as it should be lived - as affirmation, as growth, enhancement and development. And people who live their lives as a negation live the lives that we see ourselves living today - going deeper and deeper into hell and going deeper into self-destruction as a people."

"In order for us to really and clearly understand ourselves and what is happening to us, we defer to Wilson who informs us thusly:

"History is real; it brings real, tangible results. when we wish to negate it and not integrate it, when we wish to negate it and not affirm it,then it negates us in the end. The negation wins out. TheAfrican person who lives in social amnesia brought about on by the projection of mythological Eurocentric history, lives a life that is integrated and misunderstood. Why is our behavior so puzzling to us? We sometimes ask ourselves , "Why did I do that" I don't know what makes me do this." Here's behavior flowing out from our own mind and personality and we "don't" know its sources. It means that we become a puzzlement to ourselves, the ones we think that we should understand best. Often, other people can understand us better than we can understand ourselves. Frequently they have a greater knowledge of the history that made us into who we are than we do.

"If we don't know our history, or we've made our history unconscious and therefore placed it out of awareness, that unconscious history becomes a source of unconscious motivation, then why we behave the way we do become a puzzle. We're confused by our own behavior. If we want to know why we behave the way we do then, when we must know our history: the unconscious must be made conscious.

"Consequently, when the European makes us unconscious of our own history, we not only become unconscious of our history as knowledge, we become unconscious of the sources of our behavior as persons and as a people; and our own behavior becomes a mystery."why do Black(African)-folks act like that?" We get discouraged. We give up."We ain't gonna straighten them (i.e., black(African) people) out man!" Because we can't figure it out.

When history is misperceived and we look to a White Jesus and pray to that White Jesus, then we walk out and see the poverty, smell the stench, see the drugs, people holding babies up to shield themselves from bullets and all this kind of stuff ... it's not difficult for us to step over a thin line that says, "Boy, we must have done something really terrible in the past for us to be suffering the way we do." "God must have cursed us," we surmise. then we're ready for the old "Ham" mythology. We set ourselves up and we introject inferiority into ourselves We take it into our breast and pass it onto our children and we are done in. This is what happens when we don't know our history and don't know the history of other people.

"There are some "negroes" who seek to escape their history and identity by telling themselves, I don't see color." Well, do you think that the world doesn't see you as "Colored"? A lot of people fail to understand that because they may choose not to see something in a certain way, that other people still may choose to do so. The assertion ("I don't see color") doesn't change the way other people look at them.

"In fact, this perceptual misdirection sets them up to be manipulated. Almost every day we hear "Negroes"(Africans) say that they have been manipulated and are being manipulated in some sort of way. In fact, they often say it to justify their being manipulated and not confronting their reality; because they don't want want to deal with the realistic situation they live in.

"They want to deny the European's terroristic rule on Earth, deny his evil, deny his domination over them and deny his destruction of the 'earth ad life itself. So they choose not to see color, so they can't see White for what it is. They use it to justify not knowing their own history and not knowing themselves because they don't see "color" - thereby maintaining amnesia.

"When we get into "social amnesia" - into forgetting our history - we also forget or misinterpret the history and motives of other as well as our own motives. The way to know other people is to know one's self.The way to learn of our own creation, how we came to be what we are, is getting to know ourselves. It is through getting to know the self intimately that we get to know the forces that shaped us as a 'self'. Therefore, knowing the self becomes a knowledge of the world. A deep study of "African History" is the most profound way to learn about the psychology of europeans and to understand the psychology that flows from their history.

"If we don't know ourselves, not only are we a puzzle to ourselves; other people are also a puzzle to us as well. we assume the wrong identity and identify ourselves with our enemies. If we don't know who we are, then we are whomever somebody tells us we are."

Running Away From Your Self

If we discard-off ourselves we are in essence committing genocide on ourselves. For us to be in a position and state we are presently existing in, we must be out of our minds. This is borne by the state and psychological mind-set that is prevalent today in our Kasis'..
As Wilson observed, we are seriously alienating ourselves from our self: Through Craziness-This is a case of believing that wrong being right and right being wrong-confusion and debilitating Colonial Mental Disorders. How then can the people of South Africa be normal when the epidemic of drugs is so rampant and community action is lax or the will to take action is lagging? Wither Mzantsi?

Rape is occurring because we now stand for nothing and fall for everything(which is not ours or us, but someone else's). Most of us working assiduously to be, sound-like, talk-like, dress-like Americans or some Europeans. Our soaps on TV, the music on our radio stations, the videos of South Africa on other channels is nothing but a concocted fraud and frankly a pathway to madness because then, some of us are hell-bent on distancing themselves from their cultures, customs, traditions, history, languages and sacred rites practices.

How can we be normal when we don't act as our culture dictates. We are busy showing-off to each other, putting each other down, jealous and maintaining artificial, false and pretentious personalities, which, some of us imagine, is the essence of our existence-aping other people's way of lives and languages. Some of us are in a hurry to tell us their bios, resume and self-importance in life. When we meet we question each other about the type of accumulation one has: what car do you drive? Where do you live? What kind of work you doing? In the case of men, how much of a harem of girlfriends one has.. What kind of Perfume one wears, or the design of one's clothes projected as a stamp of authenticity; we are striving very hard to be one-up on each other- like crabs in a barrel, when one of them tries to climb up and go out, it is pulled down by the other crabs.

The elite class is responsible for the state of the African nation that we find ourselves in. Our children learn and copy from the habits we display and 'carry-on'- when in their presence, and we send them to schools that do not reflect their people's values, cultures, customs, traditions, history and languages. We are all responsible for what is happening in the Townships because we are too busy trying to be what we are not: American, British, Italian, you name it(some of us wanna be Chinese-and try and dress like the Communist Chinese!), go figure.

Is it no wonder then, that one hears about the 'rape' that took place in the Cape and South West Africa, and those are our talking points, whereas, right under our noses, in our streets and neighborhoods, amongst our own folks, the Rape of women goes unreported, neither in the Police station and in the gossip Newspapers we read-nothing gets resolved or solved. Our Newspapers read like a 'rape kits' tabloids and the rapport that just spews from these news mediums amounts to just that, reporting, and nothing happens to the perpetrators.

The rape of our women is an emasculation of African manhood, and devastation of our families and communities. We cannot be proud that we are number one with Rapes in the Whole world, and jut read it as just that! The needs to be accountability from us as individuals, communities, nation, police and all those charged with the role of protecting the citizenry.

One of the first steps is to work out on stamping out these drug dens dotting the Ghetto-landscpae and the White suburbs. White children and families are not immune to this social malaise. It affects the whole country. Inaction is our guilt and downfall; ignoring articles such as this one is the same process of ignoring our selves.

We are all Guilty! of letting our own people oppress us and we went along for the ride and as voyeurs in our own oppression and genocide. We are not protecting our women, the article by Rowntree points out to some of this reality above. So that, what will it take for us to begin to root out this dysfunction and confusion? What is it that should happening to wake us up because it's now becoming too late.

Why don't we use this medium of Facebook to heighten and sharpen awareness about this issue of the rape of so many of our women. We are also are accomplices, because some of us are 'sexual mercenaries' out to conquer as many women as possible, and in the process using our paltry money to get our way with poor or not-so-rich-women. We are careless with our own "Ubuntu" and we are spreading this callousness to the upcoming generations- So, what are we really hoping for?

All we do is hold innumerable and meaningless meetings, and meet at memorials(Funeral Fashion shows-and a chance of the 'whos who' to meeting and preen their egos and go into the hunt for new women or vice-versa. We have become a sad non-shadow of our self-discarded cultures, custom, traditions and so on of our ancestors-fore-fathers and fore-mothers. We think that we are better-off and much more smarter than the Africans from the North because we are more New York-esque in our shallow perception of ourselves. We are begging the Americans and Europeans to accept us, see us, hear us, as them and that there is no difference between us and them.

We seem to be saying, the fact that we are in Africa is not important, but what is important is for the imperialists to see us as one of their own.. Balderdash, and this ain't gonna happen, now, and never in the future. Not!. We will never be Americans, even if we do their drugs or the ones we manufacture ourselves, even if we can go gamble till the end of time, or talk like them(With our South african Accent-of which some of us try very hard to refine and sound more and more, ridiculously like the Americans or British or the French). We have then built within ourselves these insecure feelings and thoughts, that is why we suffer from all types of diseases and delusions of Grandeur, because we are working extremely hard to be not ourselves, running away from ourselves, forgetting ourselves, under the pretext that this is the technological age, so we belong to the "Global Village" (a la McLuhan).. That is why we are crazy in greater numbers than at any times in or lives here in Mzantsi.

We Are Really Going Nowhere Fast! Instead, we Are Hurrying-Up Very, Very, Very Slowly...

Simply Put: "We Are Raping Ourselves!

Africa - A Time Of Trouble - The Coming Of The Europeans - Part 1 - Dr. Jo

The Colonizer and the Colonized [Paperback] Albert Memmi

With Our Tropical Temperament, We Are Facing The "ICeman""

National Liberation Is Necessarily An Act Of Culture

"African cultural response to slavery and oppression in the americas and the Caribbean began on the shore of West Africa when captured Africans tried to take African soil in their hands, and sometimes in their mouths, onto the slave ships as a last desperate struggle to hold on a piece of Africa. Slavery was a war. A war against African culture, especially against the structure of the African family." (John Hendrik Clarke).

A people who free themselves from foreign domination will be free culturally only if, without complexes and without underestimating the importance of positive accretions from the oppressor and other cultures, they return to the upward paths of their own culture, which is nourished by the living reality of its environment, and which negates both harmful influences and any kind of subjection to foreign culture. Thus, it may be seen that if imperialist domination has the vital need to practice cultural oppression, national liberation is necessarily an act of culture. (Cabral)

According to ASA Hilliard, "One of the greatest obstacles to our clear vision and healthy growth as African people is the lack of unity. Africans were separated from their traditional spiritual values, family, culture, and land. forcing a total disconnect with a healthy African foundation. Africans were tortured and killed for practicing traditional religion, speaking traditional languages, using African names, and more. By the time Africans had gained a semblance of freedom to reclaim traditional practices, anti-African propaganda machines had already succeeded in enforcing a mental disengagement between Africans and anything African The lingering result has been mental and social confusion which has prevented Africans from being themselves. The result has also been that Africans are unable to unite and work to achieve true freedom. This lack of unity is in direct rejection of indigenous African principles which promote a strong sense of unity."

Revisiting The African Master Teachers and African History Forefather

We there fore read from Clarke that:

"In looking back and trying to understand the voices of our fathers, (Chinweizu, below, elaborates extensively and in-depth more on this issue), we are looking back at the wisdom dispensed by Black(African) people over the years-by African people everywhere-and to study how we survived in the conflict of coming in touch with other people without making an agreement with other people.

"We came out of a society that did not write out agreement. If we said something verbally, our mouth was sweet. That meant we could be trusted, and we didn't have to write it into law. If anybody sees you creating a pattern, they know it's yours. You didn't have to copyright the pattern because nobody's going to steal it. Once more we see honor and obligation running through the totality of our society and the totality of ourselves.

"I went back to looking at the works of Willis Huggins, one of my teachers who went to Geneva during the Italian-Ethiopian War. He was one of the founders of Ethiopian world revolution. I remembered some of the things that he told me then that have influenced me as a Teacher, especially as a person preparing to teach. He said: "Make a map leading into the area where you intended to go. In case you don't get there, those who will come after you will know how to get there. You will have a map to tell the people whee they are going." I thought about this quite a lot. That is why I make so many notes.

"I can come here and deliver this lecture without making a single note or a single mixture of preparation. Why did spend two days making notes and going over things I already know? I was making a a map.In my files, these notes will will be filled so that students and other people coming after me (when sleep comes down to sooth my weary eyes) will know how I prepared for a lecture. There's a map. It's a map of what I did on a certain day. It's a map of what I took up on a certain day. It's a map of what i took up on a certain day. It's good example in teaching.

"Then again follwoing the voices of my fathers like Schomburg, he said, "Study the life of your mastrs. then you'll know why your history was left out of world history." The he said, "Anybody who must leave a whole people out of world history and declare that people inferior, must be inferior themselves." He often often said, "Inferior things normally fall into an inferior position and stay there without any coercion or anything Ask yourself why it takes so many laws, so many police, so much brutality to keep us in i a position less than other people, and we still bounce out of it and start over ... If your didn't have the energy to survive? Keep asking this question. That's what I'm here for ti evening, to ask questions as to what has happened to us in history, and why did it happen?

"Why is our Holocaust, which started five hundred years ago still active? Why did we, a people who came against our will to the Western world to do labor, multiply while our "masters" began to disappear? Why tis furious jealousy? Why this war in schools against Black(African) males? They are the ones who can sire and women can bring birth some who may change the world. They wish to kill embryo of our children who are still unborn.

"With our "tropical" temperament. we are facing the Iceman." It will never work. I'm not saying that you yourself must have an Iceman temperment. But you must have a "realistic" temperament You must stop looking to Europe and to Europeans for any form of slavation. The European mind never developed anything that did not have as its intention the facilitation of europe's control over the world. That is all Europe intended for its philosophy/ideology to be.

"One thing you must deal with in dealing with the "Iceman", you must concede that in matters of power, he is more practical than you are, because he deals without sentiment. You say that this is happening to a human being and your human dignity lets you impose considerations on people that save their lives. He doesn't have these things to think about at all.

"I'm saying that when I look and listen again to the voices of my fathers, I look again at those great men and women who have gone on before me. They taught me through their literature, even if they didn't teach me through their life.

"Now, in the context with energy wanted to ask ourselves, with all of the people in the world: Why did they enslave us and by-pass so many people" What do you have that they wanted so much? What do you have right now that the world wants? Energy. But you are not using that energy on your behalf. You have spent too much energy indulging in the degenerate forms of a dying people. We have not spent enough energy reviving ourselves, our own custom and our own culture.

"When we deal with energy, we will deal with ourselves. Once we deal with the energy, we must deal with our great riches. If we had all the things that belong to us, not only would we be the riches people on the face of the earth, we would also be most diverse and the most powerful. We would have all of the Caribbean. Population-wise we would have Brazil., several nations in south America all of Africa (including the part which somebody says belongs to the Arabs). All that gold and manganese in south Africa, forty percent of all the known oil in the world. We would have rivers that have the greatest hydroelectric potential of any rivers in the world, right here in Africa.

"The rivers flow so naturally that many times you don't even have to build a dam. They flow so naturally that you can extract electricity right out of the river. Africa could be the most electrified continent in the world because the potential to produce electricity is higher in Africa than any other place in the whole world. We are neglecting that potential. We're eating wrong. We're dancing wrong. We're playing wrong. We're hanging out with the wrong people. We've got the wrong ideas. We've lost some confidence in doing for ourselves what we're asking other people to do for us.

"If someone else has to decide the rules of your existence, you are a prisoner to the person who made the decision. If you are peaceful and give everybody in the world a guarantee that you are going to be peaceful and not hurt anybody, there's nothing you can be in this kind of world but a slave.

'Looking at our history in its true light you have to look at the Africans who came tho this country and the minute they could master the "Iceman's"language, they tried to reclaim their history. You have to look at the history that was already made and how an entire people were completely lost from history. this happened because another people wanted to propagate the concept that the world waited in darkness for them to bring the light: The following lecture by Clarke below, goes to the heart of the discourse above.

Africa: A Time Of Trouble - The Coming Of The Europeans - Part 2: Dr. John Henrik Clarke

Africa: A Time Of Trouble - The Coming Of The Europeans - Part 3 - Dr. John Henrik Clarke

Africa: A Time Of Trouble - The Coming Of The Europeans - Part 4 - Dr. John Henrik Clarke

African Religions & Philosophy (African Writers) [Paperback] John S. Mbit

African Spirituality and European Religiosity

Africans of South Africa and Ancestral Veneration

Prof Clarke below gives us a historical lesson about Christianity and Islam from an African perspective. Biko writes the following narrative as a 'young man giving his views of the church and christianity', helping us to better understand the subject of how christianity ensconced itself into the lives and souls of Africans in South Africa.

"I am aware that today I am addressing myself to a group of people with whom I differ in two respects:

'Firstly, I am a layman talking to a group of religious ministers. Secondly, I am a young man talking to fairly elderly people.'

"These are perhaps the two aspects that brought me here. An attempt to close the generation gap is always fundamental in the re-examination of any hitherto orthodox situation which seems to be fast becoming obsolete in the minds of young people.. Also important, is the need to make common the concept of religion, especially Christianity, understanding of which is fast becoming the monopoly of so-called theologians. For this reason, I am going to deal with the topic in a lay fashion.

"To my mind, religion can be defined as an attempt by man to relate to a supreme being or force to which he ascribes all creation. Our particular model at this moment is Christianity. It is not quite clear just how important it is for the various religions that exist in this world to be uniform. One thing is certain though, that all religions have got similar characteristics:

1. The form man's moral conscience; in other words, embodied within each religion is a set of moral stipulations that govern the spiritual well-being of a particular people with a given context.

2. The all attempt to explain the origin and destiny of man. All are agreed that man in the human form is a a transient being in the world; all agree about man's origin as being from some fore, the precise nature of which is defined differently. Where religions tend to differ is in the enunciation of the destiny of men.

3. All religions claim or almost claim a monopoly on truth about the mature of the supreme being and about the way to identify with his original intention about men.

"Each religion is highly ritualistic. Through years of practice, the religion develops a certain pattern and procedure that in later years become inseparable from the central message of that religion.

"If one takes religion as nothing else but what it is - i.e., a social institution attempting to explain what cannot be scientifically known about the the origin and destiny of man, then from the beginning we an see the necessity of religion. all societies and indeed all individuals, ancient or modern, young or old, identify themselves with a particular religion and when none is existent, they develop one. In most cases, religion is intricately intertwined with the rest of cultural traits of society. In a sense, this makes the religion part and parcel of the behavioral pattern of that society and make the people bound by the limits of that religion through a strong identification with it.

"Where people are subjected to religion that is removed from their cultural make-up, then elements of disgruntlement begin to be noted and sometimes open defiance is soon displayed. hence, one can make the claim that most religions are specific and where they fail to observe the requirements of specificity, they they must be sufficiently adaptable to convey relevant messages to different people in different situations. for indeed, each religion has a message for the people amongst whom it is operative.

"These are perhaps some of the things that never were uppermost in the minds of the people who brought Christianity into South Africa. Whereas Christianity had gone through rigorous cultural adaptation from ancient Judea through rome, through London, through Brussels and Lisbon, somehow when it landed in the Cape, it was made to look fairly rigid. Christianity was made the central point of a culture which brought with it new styles of clothing, new customs, new forms of etiquette, new medical approaches, and perhaps new armaments. the people amongst whom Christianity was spread had to cast away their indigenous clothing, their customs, their beliefs which were all described as being pagan and barbaric

"Usage of the spear became a hall-mark of savagery. All too soon the people were divided into two camps - the 'converted'(Amaqhobhoka) and the pagans (Amaqaba). the difference in clothing between these two groups made what otherwise would have been merely a religious difference actually become at time internecine warfare. Stripped of the core of their being and estranged form each other because of their differences, the African people became a playground for colonialists.

"It has always been the pattern throughout history that whosoever brings the new order knows it best and is therefore the perpetual teacher of those to whom the new order is being brought. If the White missionaries were "right" about their God in the eyes of the people, then the African people could only accept whatever these new know-all tutors had to say about life. the acceptance of the colonialist-tainted version of Christianity marked the turning point in the resistant of African people.

"The church and its operation in modern-day South Africa has therefore to be looked at in terms of the the way it was introduced in this country. Even at this late stage, one notes the appalling irrelevance of the interpretation given to the Scriptures. In a country teeming with injustice and famatically committed to the practice of oppression, intolerance and blatnat cruelty becasue of racial bigotry; in a country where all Black(Africa) people are made to feel the unwanted step-children of a g]God whose presence they cannot feel; in a country where father and son, mother and daughter alike develop daily into neurotics through sheer inability to relate the present to the future because of a completely engulfing sense of destitution, the Church further adds to their insecutriy by its inward-directed definition of the concept of sin and its encouragement of the 'mea culpa" attitude.

"Stern-faced ministers stand on pulpits every Sunday to heap loads of blame on Black(African) people in Townships for their thieving, house-breaking, stabbing, murdering, adultery, et. No-one ever attempts to relate all these vices to poverty, unemployment, overcrowding, lack of schooling and migratory labor. No one want to completely condone abhorrent behavior, but it frequently is necessary for us to analyze situations a little bit deeper than the surface suggests.

"because the White missionary described Black(African) people as thieves, lazy, sex hungry, etc., and because he equated all that was valuable with Whiteness, our Churches through our ministers see all these vices I have mentioned above as manifestations of the cruelty and injustice which are subjected to by the White man, but inevitable proof that after all the White man was right when he described us as savages. Thus, if Christianity in its introduction was corrupted by the inclusion of aspects which made it the ideal religion for the colonization of people, nowadays in its interpretation it is the ideal religion for the maintenance of the subjugation of the same people.

"It must be also noted that the Church in South Africa as everywhere else has been spoilt by bureaucracy. No more is it just only an expression of the sum total of people's religious feelings, it has become in fact highly institutionalized not as one unit but as several powerful units,differing perhaps not so much on scriptural interpretation as in institutional aims. It has become inconceivable to think of South Africa without a Roman Catholic church or a Methodist Church or an Anglican Church, etc., in spite of the fact that the average Methodist from the street hardly knows how he differs fro Anglican or Congregationalist. This bureaucracy and institutionalization tends to make the Church removed from important priorities and to concentrate on secondary and tertiary functions like structures and finance, etc. And because of this, the Church has become irrelevant and in fact an "ivory tower" as some people refer to it.

"Going hand in hand with the bureaucratization and institutionalization of the Church is a special brand of problem which also makes the Church extremely irrelevant - the concentration of that bureaucracy and institutionalization i the hands of White people. It is a known fact that, barring the Afrikaans Churches, most of the Churches have 70, 80 or 90% of their membership within the Black(African) world. It is also a known fact that most of the churches have 70, 80 or 90% of controlling power in White hands. It is still a known fact that White people simply don't know Black"African) people, and in most cases do not have the interests of Black(African) people at heart.

"Therefore, it can be reasonably concluded that either the Black(African) people's Churches are governed by a small non-sympatheic foreign minority or that too many Black(African) people are patronizing foreign Churches. Which of these tow it is, is not quite clear, but let us assume that it is the former, since the majority of the people in this country are Black(African) people.

"In that case therefore, Black(African) people who are Christians are not only conniving at the hitherto irrelevant nature of Christianity as spelt out by the Churches, but they also allow a non-sympatheic minority which is not interested in making Christianity relevant to people remain in control of the workings of the Churches. this is an untenable situation if allowed to continue much longer will deplete from the already thinning crowds that go to Church on Sunday.

"Then too, the tendency by Christians to make interpretation of religion a specialist job, results in general apathy in a world which is fast departing from identification with mystiism. Young people nowadays would like to feel that they can interpret and extract from it messages relevant to them and their situation without being stopped by orthodox limitations. this is why the Catholic Church with its dozens of dogmas either has to adjust fast to a changing world or risk the chance of losing the young constituency. In various aspects, this applies to all churches in the Christian world.

"Before looking at suggested changes within the Church, let me then summarize what I regard as my major criticism of it:

1. It makes christianity too much of a "turn the other cheek" religion whilst addressing itself to a destitute people.

2. It is stunted with bureaucracy ad institutionalization.

3. It manifests in its structures a tacit acceptance of the system, i.e., "White equals value".

4. It is limited by too much specialization.

"The most important area to which we should direct ourselves is gaining control that is rightfully ours within these Churches. In order to do this, we must agree that in fact we have a common purpose, a common goal, a common problem. Equally, we should agree that through living in a privileged society, and through being socialized in a corrupt system, our white Christian counterparts though brothers in Christ, have not proved themselves brothers in south Africa. We must agree also that tacitly or overtly, deliberately or unawares, white Christians within the Churches are preventing the Church from assuming its natural character in the south African context, and therefore preventing it from being relevant to the Black(African) man's situation.

"It has been said by many a Black(African) Church man, that Whites are in power within the Churches, because the Churches are modeled on Western lines which White people know best. In order to be able therefore to change the Churches, we have first to gains ascendance over them in that white model,then thereafter turn that model into one we cherish, we love, we understand, and one that is relevant to us. I can only point out here that it cannot be conceivable that all the White people in controlling positions within the Church are elected by other White people.

"Obviously, some get into their positions because they caucus vote-wielding Black(Africans) to put them in those positons. It is high time that Black(African) people learn the highly tried method of caucusing to put other Black(African) people in control of Churches in which Black(African) people have something at stake. Such elected Black)Africans) will obviously have to function according to a mandate clearly outlined by the same Black(African) caucus that put them in power.

"The second area in which we must focus our attention is a thorough understanding of what many people have hitherto scorned, namely, Black(African) Theology. There is a truth in the statement that many people can say one thing differently because they look at it from different angles. Christianity can never hope to remain abstract and removed from the people's environmental problems. In order to be applicable to people, it must have meaning for them in their given situation. If they are an oppressed people, it must have something to say about their oppression.

"Black(African) Theology, therefore, is a situational interpretation of Christianity. It seeks to relate the present-day Black(African) man to god within the given context of the Black(African) man's suffering and his attempts to get out of it. It shifts the emphasis of man's moral obligations from avoiding wronging false authorities by not loosing his Reference Boo(Called a 'Pass' in Apartheid times), not stealing food when hungry and not cheating police when he is caught, to being committed to eradicating all cause for suffering as represented in the death of children from starvation, outbreaks of epidemics in poor areas, or the existence of thuggery and vandalism in Townships. In other words, it shifts the emphasis from petty sins to major sins in a society, thereby ceasing to teach the people to "Suffer Peacefully".

""These topics that Black(African minsters of religion must begin to talk about seriously if they are to save Christianity from falling foul with Black(African) people particularly young people. the time has come for our own theologians to take up the cudgels of the fight by restoring a meaning an direction in the Black(African) man's understanding of god. No nation can win a battle without faith, and if our faith in our god is spoilt by having to see him through the eyes of the same people we are fighting against, then there obviously begins to be something wrong with that relationship.

"Finally, I would like to remind the Black(African) ministry, and indeed all Black(African) people that God is not in the habit of coming down from heaven to solve people's problem on earth."

Having read Bantu thus far, and listened to Prof. Clarke in his two speeches above about Islam and Christianity, there two points that emerge, Spirituality and religion, both as practiced or observed by Africans' 'spirituality', by Clarke) and 'religion-Church'- (by Bantu). The differences in practicing both is as different as the cultures are both people are different in all aspects of their cultures and practices thereof, including the Africans, who according to Clarke practice 'spriritauality' and the Europeans come with their religious practices and as colonizers. these two revolutionaries make it clear that the spiritual and religious practices of africans and Europeans are as different as day is to night..


Christianity before Christ Dr. John Henrik Clarke

Things Fall Apart Paperback by Chinua Achebe

"No Community That Has Lost It's Intimate Connections To Its Wise Elders Can survive."

Factoid

Africa is the world’s second-largest and second-most-populous continent. At about 11.7 million sq miles including adjacent islands, it covers 6 % of the Earth’s total surface area and 20.4 % of the total land area. With 1.0 billion people, it accounts for about 14.72% of the world’s human population. Africa has 54 fully recognized sovereign states (“countries”), 9 territories and three de facto states with limited recognition. Africa is considered by most paleoanthropologists to be the oldest inhabited territory on Earth, with the human species originating from the continent.(Statstic Brain)

"Africans around the globe have faced oppression for more than 2000 years. This oppression has intensified in the last 400 years. Africans have faced the unique terror of oppression and have worked and fought to recreate and control their own socialization process. The mission of a quality, African controlled, socialization process is more than a basic response to oppression. It is also a fundamental path to promote healthy individual and collective development, while preventing cultural and national genocide.

"Africa is the other of civilization, and the land where the very foundations in socialization practices were laid; influencing cultures all over the world. When Europeans, Asians, and members of most major religions travelled to Africa, they found fully functioning cultures of people who were in control of their won destiny. Unfortunately, the mission of the outsiders was, typically, to steal the natural resources and/or people, to control the land, and to dominate and control the people. Up to the writing of this Hug, the mission of the descendants of these outsiders is the same.

"To justify the brutal greedy, and inhumane behavior directed at Africans, oppressors instituted and fostered slanderous propaganda campaigns to paint a picture of Africans as cultureless, ignorant, and evil people. These campaigns included diverse international codes, messages and signals which were used to produce the same result; the full scale degradation of African people wherever they exist in the world.The goal was and is to encourage everyone, but especially Africans, to resist Africa and never speak about European Imperialism against Africans Around the world.

"Fortunately, there are Africans around the world who act in defiance of the numerous institutions and individuals committed to suppressing all traces of African consciousness. these Africans stand tall and continue to teach speak and act in truth. Discourse and active organization strategies intended to lead African people to command their own socialization process, must build and improve upon distinct African indigenous traditions. Numerous documents and oral histories outline the vast traditions which were practiced by our African Ancestor and passed down through the generations. We must critique these traditions and, when needed, improve upon them so that they will address the contemporary challenges that Africans face around the world.

"We must also understand that our indigenous socialization practices can help us clarify our purpose and vision as an African family. Today, as we continue to face the culture wars against African people, we must not surrender or neglect our vision of an appropriate destiny that derives from who we are as a people. It is a vision that point to our survival and maps the steps that lead to a reclamation of our African culture and power.

There is no need to struggle to change the minds of those who make a personal choice function as an individual and not as a member of an ethnic family; with the obligations that family membership entails. But we do need to be clear about who chooses to in the family and who prefers to be an individual or just "happens to be Black.' Understanding this distinction will clarify the kinds of expectations or challenges which might be posed by certain people. It will help us to know who will be an advocate for African liberation versus who will be an opportunistic individual.

"One of the greatest obstacles to African people's clear vision and health growth as a people is the lack of unity. Africans were tortured and killed for practicing traditional religion, speaking traditional languages, using African names, and more. By the time africans had gained a semblance of freedom to reclaim traditional practices, anti-African propaganda machines had already succeeded in enforcing a mental disengagement between Africans and anything African. The lingering result has been metal and social confusion, which has prevented Africans from being themselves. The result has also been that Africans are unable to unite and work to achieve true freedom. This lack of unity is in direction rejection of indigenous African principles which promote a strong sense of community.

"Restricting one's identity to physical characteristics is equal to acquiescing to the European domination strategy of ethnic cleansing and cultural genocide. People often confuse "race" with ethnic and cultural identity. When we see people who look like us, we assume that they all regard themselves as members of the African Ethnic family; in addition to being Black. Many Africans believe that our only real struggle is to join the mythical "mainstream" as individuals. While we, as Africans may have individual distinctions connected to religion, , class, nationality, etc., we must be careful not to allow these distinctions to divide us in the name of service to oppressors.

"Who will make an unapologetic commitment to the Africa family? Even as oppressors work to represent Black or Darker skinned people of the world as being inhuman spirits in need of domination, sensible people know that we are all members of the human race. Still, the fact that many people prefer to pretend that 'darker' humans are not the ones who continue to catch the brunt of oppressive laws, behavior, and overall exploitation do not change the reality. It is by design that today, many Black people around the world, cry that they do not want to be culturally connected to Africans. "Color me human and do not separate me" is the shallow cry of those bent on perpetuating a mythical "colorless" yet firmly European orientation; as if to suggest that claiming, respecting, and using one's indigenous tradition is anti-human.

"As people play the shallow 'color" game, African people, on the continent, are in dire economic an political circumstances. African remain victims of foreign powers who operate only in their own self interest. even as European nations unite to assist each other, African nations have an impaired position in the world. this powerlessness has a direct effect on all Africans in the Diaspora who often see no special relationship to continental Africans, and are not advocates for them. The alienation of Africans from other Africans has enormous consequences.

No matter where Africans are in the world, our circumstances are basically the same. Many of us are waiting for a magic program, a grant, a charismatic leader, or European institutions to lead us to the "promised land." the reality is that there is no chance that anyone other than Africans will act to move us from the bottom of the heap. But as we move in the direction of liberation, who will accept an identity with african people, without apology?

"Those who benefit from the oppression of Africans understand that cultural disorder and family disunity facilitate the process of domination and control. This approach is used around the world, and it represents the process where-by Africans adopt any means available to surrender their African culture.

The Nature Of Traditional African Socialization


Once we can begin to realize that we are African people and accept the fact that we are African people, we begin to deal with ourselves as we are what we accept we are and can be. We learn the following from Asa Hilliard:

""Once you determine that you are a member of the family they you must "pull your weight." There is no more serious work for us than to do our part to regain primary control of socialization over our children, and to base our design for contemporary African education in the best of our traditional structures. An African education process is anchored in a nurturing process derived form an African view of the world, and a shared understanding of our environment and our existence in it. that worldview is itself derived from our African community's response to its challenges in our environment in general, and our response to political and economic challenges in particular. We must study and try to understand the core elements of our indigenous systems which have thousands of years of independent development behind them. We need to take these elements, evaluate them, and utilize those that can be of value to us as we continue to develop and grow as a people.

"As we continue to our mission of socializing ourselves with the use of our own systems, we must begin with the understanding that African people laid the foundations for education and socialization. Some of the principles and practices that were outlined thousands of years ago, continue to influence people today. Later derived European systems diverged in important ways from the African value based system, but key approaches were directly influenced by African Master Teachers from the past.

"The current negative and disrespectful view of African and /africans, by many, is very recent. For example, a careful review of Europeans records featuring reports of early contacts with African, shows that they were in awe of African intellect and creativities. This is not surprising as Nile Valley architecture, education, philosophy, science, mathematics, spirituality and more, influenced visitors and students from Europe. The students included Europe's finest,including many of it's, so-called, famous philosophers.

"In spite of centuries of attempts at ethnic cleansing and miseducation, there are ancient independent systems of indigenous african socialization that are still in operation today on the continent and in the diaspora. These systems are not familiar to most of us anymore. Some socialization retentions are watered down versions of what we once had, whole some have changed little since ancient times. These retentions provide opportunities to observe and learn about some of the indigenous socialization practices.

"The task of reclaiming even a portion of the best indigenous socialization practices in Africa is enormous. The continent of Africa is some 11,608,000 square miles; twenty percent of the earths land. Over 853.6 million(Censors as of July 29, 2012) African people populate the continent. Add Africans in the diaspora and that brings the total of Africans in the world to more than a billion and a half. Africans speak at least 1000 different languages, practice a variety of rituals and traditions, and foster distinct cultures.

"But even with the variety on the continent and in the Diaspora, African posses many basic cultural connections that extend beyond individual, tribal istinctions. They include similar socialization practices, rituals, and perceptions of community, the Ancestors, and God.

"Some African socialization retentions have been modified, and can be recognized only by well-prepared observers. Examples of African Cultural Retentions abound. Africans in Suriname, located on the North coast of South America, have managed to maintain traditional African culture; even more so than many contemporary Africans in Ghana. They are able to maintain these traditions after almost four hundred years of physical separation form Ghana. (Evans)

"Our communities can benefit greatly if we would collectively resist the meaningless holidays and ceremonies which are promoted in contemporary capitalistic societies. These holidays, and their aggressive promotion, are meant to encourage spending to enrich certain businesses and corporations. These holidays have no positive transformative value for individuals and communities participating in them.

"The african emphasis on community and interdependence is a socialization product that has extended around the globe. It is not the matter of accident. TheAfrican family (called "extended" by europeans, who use their nuclear family as a universal norm), includes mother, father, children, relatives, friends, elders, ancestors and god. Beyond the importance of indigenous concepts which emphasize the importance of a strong community, there is a firm commitment to helping one to understanding one's relationship with the world, nature and God.

"We must not be distracted by the false argument that, using African traditions in the "modern or postmodern world" is useless, misguided, trivial, and irrelevant. Technology is a part of Africa's heritage, and even under conditions of slavery, colonization, segregation, and White supremacy ideology, Africans have been at the forefront of science and technology in nuclear energy research, information technology, engineering, etc.. There is no conflict between high technology and African traditions.(Joseph) The difference is that it must be balanced with the traditional value, which emphasize that technology must compliment nature, not destroy it. [we also have to pay attention to the arrogance of the European cultural nationalists who want to establish their parochial particular culture as a universal norm.

"The transmission of African culture for the purpose of socializing the community must, first and foremost, must be under the control of the African community. There is no alternative to it. If we have few resources, then we can do only what our resources permit. This task should not be turned over to others. We cannot have alien sponsors pay for our rites of passage. Socialization is a life-long journey and it is the responsibility of spiritually grounded, experienced elders who are the custodians of the community knowledge. It is their role to ensure that it is communicated to all generations. ... "No Community That Has Lost It's Intimate Connections To Its Wise Elders Can survive."

Dr. Marimba Ani Speaks in Atlanta on Oct. 28. 2012

Citizenship, Belonging and Intergenerational Relations in African Migration (Migration, Diasporas and Citizenship) [Hardcover] Claudine Attias-Donfut (Editor)

Intergenerational Cultural Transmission

Intergenerational Cultural Transmission

We learn from Asa Hilliard"

"A core part of our mission today is to study and transfer the valuable information about our cultural traditions to our people. This will serve, in part, to reconnect many Africans who are far removed from our ancient and traditional intergenerational cultural transmission practices. Traditionally, our socialization was under the independent control of knowing and wise African elders transmission practices. Traditionally, our socialization was under the independent control of knowing and wise African elders, who were legitimate representatives of the African commuity. While many people are exposed to all sorts of propaganda via television, radio, and to all sort of propaganda via television, radio, newspapers, few of us have been exposed to the wisdom of elders right in our own communities; let alone the wisdom of those who practiced our best traditions. We have lost our understanding of the indispensable role that control of the socialization plays in our survival and destiny and thus, we have failed to ensure proper intergenerational cultural transmission.


"We have a vital responsibility to our children and to our community for intergenerational cultural transmission. Our survival and our enhancement as a people are dependent upon our embrace of this responsibility and our release of total dependency on european system. We must mobilize to think and to act to restore this vital function of intergenerational cultural transmission to all our communities.

"We must study our African indigenous traditions in order to understand and to evaluate our cultural, situation now. Many of us remain African at a deep structural level. A study of our traditions will reveal that they rival any tradition past or present, and that we have valid options for world view, values and practices, which are suitable for us today, with appropriate modification.

"We must be assertive in countering denigration and defamation, which charge that African people have no meaningful traditions to recall. We, as a community,must rescue and reconstruct the most viable elements of our powerful African indigenous socialization systems. We cannot avoid it. We cannot delegate it.

"Years ago, Carter Goodwin Woodson (1968) warned against an oppressor imposed miseducation. that alienated us from our people and traditions. W.E.B. DuBois skillfully outlined the details of the "double consciousness" that causes African people to see themselves through the eyes other people(1969). He understood that European hegemony is established through miseducation and alien cultural socialization. some oppressed people join with their oppressors to make the European system of oppression more efficient, becoming agents in the oppression of Africans, as was true of some of us during the slave trade, who betrayed their own people (Armah, 1979). As we see happening here in 'South Africa, the ANC has becoming very efficient at maximizing the Multi-corporation's and foreign government more high by oppressing their own people

"Africans must meet , study, write, and produce. THERE IS NO SHORT CUT! We must go through the Door of No Return, transforming it to the Door Of Return, reconnecting to our traditions and propelling ourselves forward in a direction of our own choosing. We must reclaim our continent, our Culture and Ourselves[And Our African History."

"While African culture has been stolen, Europeans have forced and infused a generally unhealthy culture upon Africans. As Africans have adopted this alien culture, it has had negative consequences for our mental power, cultural power, physical power, and for the natural resources in the land of our ancestors. In order to survive and keep a minority of people on the planet living a wealthy life, Europeans determined that Africans and the threat of African power had to neutralized at all cost. Cultural Terrorism was exercised to create disorder , confusion, and dependency among Africans.

"No matter where you live in the world you cannot escape the history and legacy of the oppression of Africans. The patterns of oppression are seen in every facet of our society. Oppression and its consequences are, in part, the result of our ignorance of the power of African socialization traditions. By falsifying African history, culture and records, and even claiming it as its own, Europeans have elevate themselves. This meant that African values, culture, philosophy, etc., had to be put down. This meant that anything African had to be attacked, and that Africans had to be socialized to resist anything African.

"With many Africans having left their culture, we have been tricked into using the European "racial" identity model, a model that places all of the emphasis for defining identity on the contemplation of pigment and other aspects of phenotype. When we become preoccupied with our "racial" or phenotypic features, we fail to consider sufficiently our vast cultural wealth which connects us to Africans around the world.

The lasting challenge that we face is the absence of information and understanding of African culture. This has been by design. The enforcers of an oppressive system work to create cultural disorder among the oppressed. In particular, they suppress the value of other cultures while glorifying and fabricating the history of themselves. They understand that the resulting disorder will make it impossible for the oppressed to be truly independnent. Fanon made some interesting observations along these lines:

"The unilaterally decreed normative value of certain cultures deserves our careful attention....The enterprise of deculturation turns out to be the negative of a more gigantic work of economic, and even biological enslavement... The doctrine of cultural hierarchy is thus but one aspect of a systematized hierarchization implacably pursued. ...For its systems of reference have to be Broken. Expropriation, spoliation, raids, objective murder, are matched by the sacking of cultural patterns, or at least condition such sacking. The social panorama is destructed; values are flaunted, crushed and emptied.

"...The lines of force of force, having crumbled, no longer give direction. In their stead, a new system of values is imposed, not proposed but affirmed, by the heavy weight of cannons and sabers.

"...This culture, once living and open to the future, becomes closed, fixed in the colonial status, caught in the yoke of oppression. Both present and mummified, it testifies against its members. It defines them in fact without appeal. The cultural mummification leads to a mummification of individual thinking. The apathy so universally noted among colonial peoples is but the logical consequence of this operation. As though it were possible for a man to evolve otherwise than within the framework of a culture that recognizes him that he decides to assume

"...Thus, we witness the setting up of archaic inert institutions, Functioning under the oppressor's supervision and patterned like a caricature of formerly fertile institutions."

Asa continues to add:

"Regardless of our understanding of the diverse ways in which European system of education typically failed African people, Africans continue to be dependent on the European approach; an approach that carries no high expectations of us. In fact, the European system is based largely on assumptions that we lack the intellectual and cultural capacity for high levels of achievement. Actually, Western education for the masses carries no high values and aims for anyone. European, African or others; not even excellence in basic skills. This is a very dangerous development for us. Miseducation continues to be a threat to our survival as a people. This particular form of miseducation strives to make us individuals, non-spiritual, materialistic, passive consumers, and even cravers of White supremacy ideas, contents, behaviors and values. In the final analysis, culturally dependent people will believe, internalize and utilize anything that they are socialized to believe is correct.

"The cultural dependency of African people and many other ethnic groups is due to years of miseducation and gradual loss of control of intergenerational cultural transmissio. Most Africans are in deep debt. Most of us purchase goods and services from non-Africans. Even simple things like hair-care and nail maintenance are provided for many of us by others. worst of all, there is an absence of a community controlled intergenerational cultural transmission process. the void is filled by propaganda of others. Gradually, we have lost the memory of our values, our history, and our creativity." Africans have lost the sense and know-how of a Nation and governing a nation of African people without outside interference]

The Master Teachers - 'Like It Is' With Gill Noble PT.1

The Master Teachers - 'Like It Is' With Gill Noble PT.2

The Master Teachers - 'Like It Is' With Gill Noble PT.3

At The Feet Of The Grand Masters - Part 4: Dr. Ben, Dr. Clarke, Dr. Jackson

At The Feet Of The Grand Masters, Part 5 - Dr. Ben, Dr. Clarke, Dr. Jackson

The Master Teachers - 'Like It Is' With Gill Noble PT.6

The Master Teachers - 'Like It Is' With Gill Noble PT.7

The Master Teachers - 'Like It Is' With Gill Noble PT.8

The Master Teachers - 'Like It Is' With Gill Noble PT.9

The Master Teachers - 'Like It Is' With Gill Noble PT.10

The Master Teachers - 'Like It Is' With Gill Noble PT.11

The Master Teachers - 'Like It Is' With Gill Noble PT.12

The Master Teachers - 'Like It Is' With Gill Noble PT.13

The History of Africa [Paperback] Molefi Kete Asante

Knowing Our History And Our Selves Well, Empowers Us

Studying, Understanding and Taking Power


Throughout this whole Hub, Clarke and other Master Teachers talk about how if we could study and write our own history, we will transform the present social malaise we exist and gain power. My attempting in writing the history of South Africa using Dr. Clarke a as crutch empowered and helped me to see how hard and fulfilling, also edifying it is to try and acquire and maintain power-because I control the historical narrative and determine how it should be written from an African centered perspective. Wilson informs us thusly:

"The definitions of Power are various and conflicting. This is due mainly to the multifarious nature of power itself, rather than due to its unreality of ephemeral spirit. Few, if any of us, doubt the reality of power and the tangible effects its application engenders. Our confusion as to its exact definition more likely flows from the fact that power, depending on context and circumstance, assumes ubiquitous shapes and forms, varying degrees of transparency and visibility. Power is the chameleon; it takes on the texture of its environment.

"Power comes with being; with interactive existence; with being alive. It is the essence of life and the motive force of growth. And development and the adaptability of living things to environmental changes and demands. Power refers to the ability to do, the ability to be, the ability to prevail. Beingness and aliveness originate with power. To be powerless is to be will-less, impotent and lifeless; without effect or influence; to be nothing, of no account.

"The oppressed and downtrodden, having been traumatized by the abuse of power by their powerful oppressors, often come to perceive power itself as inherently evil, as by nature corrupting and therefore as something to be eschewed, denied and renounced. The pursuit of power is viewed as unworthy of virtuous persons, an the desire to possess it as sinful.Therefore, many among the powerless and poor feel compelled to find in their powerlessness and poverty the emblematic signs of their Godliness and redemptive salvation.

"How convenient a precept for rationalizing and maintaining the power of the "Haves" over the "Have-nots!" As the result of their ideological manipulation by the powerful and their own reactionary misperception of reality, the poor and powerless have been made to perceive the pursuit, possession and application of power in their own behalf as unbecoming to themselves. This is even more the case when through their naive acceptance of the self-serving deceptive propaganda perpetrated by the powers-that-be, their own reactionary self-negation, and their nursing of their internalized inferiority complexes, the poor huddled masses perceived the possession and exercise of power as the inherent and exclusive prerogative of the ruling class.

"There are many Blacks(Africans) who have ben convinced by racist propaganda that supreme power is divinely deeded to dominant Whites, They therefore suffer anxiety attacks and feel as if the are blasphemously rebelling against God, Himself, if they - even for a moment - seriously dare consider conspiring to wrest power form the hands of their oppressors. More unfortunate than this sorely mistaken theological perception is the self-abnegating perception by many Blacks(Africans) that they are incapable of mounting a successful campaign against oppressive White power and therefore must sulkingly seek the least onerous accommodation to it.

"This perception of and orientation toward power on the part of African peoples, is but a pre-scription for their unending subordination, exploitation, and ultimately, when it is convenient to the purposes of their oppressors, their genocidal demise. Therefore, if they are to survive and prsper in freedom then, like it or not, African peoples must come to terms with power. We must be ever conscious of the fact that "...the establishment, whatever rewards it gives us, will also, if necessary to maintain its control, kill us."(Howard Zinn)

The Power of Self-Transformation

The Miseducation Of Africans's Miseducation


"As noted by Chancellor Williams, the way we think, the way we behave, helps to create us as a better and 'more advanced" than who we were pre-colonial occupation of AfricaThis perspective will be delved-into much more by Chinweizu, below). Williams states:

"Nothing is clearer than the tragic fact that Africa, like the rest of the Black(African) world, has only the illusion of being free and independent. It is only about one-third free. It is still economically enshackled as it ever was, in some respects, more so. The study of this period and the conditions it presents will confront the Blacks(Africans) of the world with the final challenge. the response to that challenge will be the best test of the genius of the race.

"The outcome and, indeed, the whole future of the race depends upon the extent to which we have have become intellectually emancipated and decaucasianized enough to pioneer original thinking. Those who do become free in fact, will no longer readily grab the White man's ideologies and systems whether capitalism, the Western version of 'democracy', or communism, without a critical review and analysis to determine whetter Africa's own traditional system, when updated,may not be truly superior and best fitted to meed the aspirations of the Black(African) world. this last period, then, is the the time of great decisions. It may well be the Back(African) race's last chance for a rebirth and salvation. We shall have to learn from our African history what our strengths were and, especially, in what particular aspect we are weak and vulnerable. Our African History can then become at once the foundation and guiding light for united efforts in serious planning what we should be about now."

We learn from Chinweizu that:

"How do the members of a group escape the suicidal mystifications of colonial miseducation? Clearly, it is suicidal for lambs to see, think and act out of assumptions about the world that reflect and further the interests of links and jackals preying upon them. for me, it took the grievous happenings of the 1960s in Nigeria and other places, to shock my colonized and properly miseducated consciousness into re-examining itself.

"Conflicting reports and interpretations of the Congo Crisis, the Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam; the rather swift degeneration of the grand opportunities of Nigeria's independence into riots, uprisings and civil war-these were some of the events that made me suspect that What I had been conditioned to accept as reality was,more often than not, a misrepresentation of events and for the world by colonial and neo-colonial interests.

"I then began an attempt to thoroughly and systematically examine the colonial miseducation which had subtly disposed me to accept the official, imperialist presentation of the world. And what was that miseducation from whose habits of perception and thought I found necessary to rescue myself? It was a miseducation which, under the mystique of '"modernizing" me into some "civilized" condition, and would twist my cultural spine, and rivet my admiring gaze upon Europe and the West.

"It was a miseducation which sought to quarantine me fro all influences, ancient as well as contemporary, which did not emanate from, or meet with the imperial approval of, western "civilization." It was a miseducation which, by encouraging me to glorify all things European, and by teaching me a low esteem fro and negative attitudes towards things African, sought to cultivate in me that kind of inferiority complex which drives a perfectly fine right foot to strive to mutilate itself into into a a left foot.

"It was miseducation full of gaps and misleading pictures: it sought thereby to indoctrinate me with the colonizer's ideology; it sought to structure my eyes to see the world in the imperialist way of seeing the world; it sought to internalize in my consciousness the values of the colonizers; it sought to train me to automatically uphold and habitually employ the colonizers viewpoint in all matters, in the strange belief that their racist, imperialist, anti-African interest is the universal, humanist interest, and in the strange belief that the view defined by their ruthless greed is the rational, civilized view.

And by such terms of supposed praise as "advanced," "detribalized." and "getting to be quite civilized;" it sought to co-opt my sympathies and make me contemptuous of examining what it should have been my duty to change and alleviate. For it was a distracting miseducation which tried in every way to avoid questions that were important to me and to the collective African condition. It tried to maneuver me away from asking the; it tried to keep me from probing them most thoroughly; it tried instead to preoccupy me with other matters.

"But the hard realities of the Black(African) condition kept insisting I ask: "where did our poverty, our material backwardness, our cultural inferiority complexes begin and why? And why do they persist in spite of political independence?

"When I turned to the official explainers and interpreters, and to the expert and benevolent meliorists of our condition, and asked for a flash light, they wrapped my head instead with a shroud of double-talk and evasions; they thrust my head into a garbage dump of facts, facts and more bits and pieces of facts which merely confused me the more by their (deliberately?) disorganized abundance; they punctured the membranes of my ears with slogans, distinctions without differences, smart phrases which brightly and engagingly misled; they offered me tools, supposedly analytic, which mauled what they claim to explain, and left me constipated with jargon and dazed with confusion. The experience was thoroughly disillusioning.

"In my pain I began to suspect that my mind had been, over the years, held prisoner in a den where intellectual opiates were served me by official schools, b approved lists of books, by the blatant as well as subliminal propaganda of films, and by an overwhelming assortment of media controlled by interests inimical to, and justifiably scared of a true and thorough-going African nationalism.

"Suspecting that the glittering phalanx of experts spoke for my colonizers and their imperialist interests, I felt that, even though I was not an "expert"in these fields, I should nevertheless conduct my own investigations into the origins and circumstances of the deplorable African stasis, learning the necessary skills "on the job, as it were

"Even though my training in colonial educational institutions had been quite ample, thorough, and as prestigious as they come, one of the first obstacles to my inquiry came from the very attitudes I had imbibed as part of that sort of elitist education. Who was I to doubt the authoritative pronouncements of specialists and experts in fields other than my own? Who was I to doubt the authoritative pronouncements of the official apostles of humanism, the exalted and disinterested vendors of the Good, the True and the Beautiful? Who was I to doubt these missionaries of enlightenment, these selfless crusaders for our "modernization" up from "primitivism". We're anything but what they were proclaimed they were, or that we, their "wards," were anything but what they said we were?

"But while contesting the authority of my doubt, I realized that I had permitted myself to doubt. And in doubting so fundamentally, so painfully, I had made the first breach in the walls of my colonized consciousness. Thereafter, the fate of my colonized consciousness was not unlike that of Humpty Dumty: not all the official casuists, propagandists and sanctimonious experts could put it back together again. For I would no longer swallow without question the news according to the BBC, the New York Times, or Le Monde; nor the image of the world according to Hollywood, nor the gospel of 'modernization' and development according to the prestigious assortment of western propaganda systems.

Africans And Their Historical Yarn

Escape From Colonized Consciousness: Purging Miseducation

"My official education was over. The overthrow of the allegiances programmed into me by it was in swift progress; but there were vital things I still had to learn-things they did not and would not teach me in school; things they would, if they could, keep me from coming into contact with even outside school. And so, I began a journey of the mind; a journey by a mind thoroughly alienated from its imperialized upbringing;a mind seeking complete escape from the debilitating conditions produced by the narcotic of a colonized miseducation. And the purpose of this journey was first to seek out the roots of the Black(African) Condition within which my mind suffered.

"By the way, if any should think inappropriate my discussing colonial education through the imagery of opium and narcotics,let them consider that the British, form 1839 to 1842, waged war on China in order to force the Chinese to buy opium which her Britannic Christian Majesty's imperial agents grew in India. Victory in Opium war earned the British the "right" to addict so many Chinese with Opium that much of the population, nodding and half asleep all the time, was supinely amenable to western aggression and imperialist manipulation. No, if they could go that far, why should their use of intellectual opium to subdue, for the same ends, some other unlucky victims seem incredible and outlandish?

"In my fight for their intellectual Opium Den, to discover Fanon, Cesaire, and others was like bursting into a head-clearing gust of fresh, crisp air. It was refreshing and exhilarating to discover that others from the Black(African) world had left records of their escapes from the colonizers of our "consciousness". And above all, quite unlike the authoritative jargon from the official experts and embalmers, what Fanon and Company said made sense-powerful, moving and enlightening sense. With the title of his book, "Black Skin, White Masks, Frantz Fanon, in just one phrase, diagnosed the malady I shared, in various degrees, with most other from our colonized Background. And in two brief sentences, Hamidou Kane identified the source of the infection in my consciousness, namely the colonial school:

"Better than the cannon, it makes conquest permanent. The Cannon compels the body, the school bewitches the soul."

"And Aime Cesaire, with a few remarkable sentences, showed how to deal with the enchanting lies of the colonial school, the habitual lies of the whole colonial culture:

"... ler us go straight to the principal lie which is the source of all theothers. Colonization and Civilization? In dealing with this subject, the commonest curse is to be the dupe in good faith of a collective hypocrisy that cleverly misrepresents problems, the better to legitimize the hateful solutions provided for them. In other words, the essential thing here is to see clearly the inno