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64 Macrophotography / Microphotography of Flying Insects or Bugs ~ Images of Flying Insects or Bugs

Iridescent wings are displayed beautifully and contrast well against the black of the insect's body. The texture of the wings of this particular insect is very unusual.

Iridescent wings are displayed beautifully and contrast well against the black of the insect's body. The texture of the wings of this particular insect is very unusual.

Through the macrophotography of flying insects, we will be soaring to new heights and observing some of our winged friends, and perhaps enemies, in a way that we are not able to do in our everyday lives.

We have already journeyed to the world of the dragonfly, the butterfly and the moth, so you will not be viewing many of these creatures in the following images.

You will see many bees, wasps, and flies. But more than that, you will be seeing features concerning these insects that you probably did not even know they had. Macrophotography allows us to view these creatures up close and personal.

You will be able to see the wings of these insects, something that is often hard to do with a flying insect. You will see their alien type mouthparts and their hairy bodies. You will be able to view their segmented body, legs and antenna. And let's not forget about their often over-sized compound eyes.

But even more important, macro photography will provide you a view that is better than you would ever be able to see with the naked eye. And you can take as long as you want to admire the intricate details because our subjects will not be flying away. So enjoy the journey through the macro photography of flying insects.

Clicking on most images will allow you to view a larger version of that image.

In the images below, notice the different types of antenna that flying insects have. Notice also, the different types and sizes of wings, plus all the different ways and places that they attach to the insect's body.

The images below show close-ups of many different insect's compound eyes. Take time to look at their front legs and their antenna also.

The bee above seems to be cocking its head in understanding.


There are so many things to see in the photo below. Notice the different types of hair and fur on the legs and body. The antenna and mouthparts are very easily viewed in this image. Look at the ends of its front feet, it almost appears to have toes.

The insect above has a piercing mouth part. Its antenna is very interesting.

Many of the images below allow you to get a good view of the insects' antennas, eyes, legs and mouthparts.

In the photos below, notice the interesting wings and eyes on these insects. Notice the different types of antennae and the hairs on these insects.

Interesting Insect - Cloak and Dagger Cuckoo Bee

This a very different and interesting bee. This is a Cloak and Dagger Cuckoo bee. This bee is homeless and rests and sleeps out in the open on a twig just as this one (see below) is doing. This bee does not build a nest or a hive, and they do not collect pollen.

Their behavior is very similar to their namesake, the cuckoo bird. The Cloak and Dagger Cuckoo bee lays its eggs in the nests of other bees, such as the Teddy bear bee and the Blue Banded bee. The term for this behavior is know as kleptoparasitism, which literally means parasitism by theft.

As the Cloak and Dagger Cuckoo bee makes its rounds during the day, they observe the Teddy Bear bee or the Blue Banded bee and then follow them back to their burrows. Waiting for the right moment, they then enter the burrow and lay an egg, many times killing the offspring that is already present in the burrow.


Macrophotography of Flying Insects

Through the macrophotography of flying insects, we have journeyed into a new world of beauty and have observed flying insects in spectacular ways. Many people fear bees and wasps, some, justifiably, because of their severe allergies to bee and wasp stings. Through the use of macrophotography, we are all able to view these insects safely and even better than we could have done with the naked eye.

I hope you have enjoyed our trip through the macrophotography of flying insects and will join me in another macrophotography adventure:



© 2011 Cindy Murdoch

Comments: "64 Macrophotography / Microphotography of Flying Insects / Bugs ~ Images of Flying Insects or Bugs"

Cindy Murdoch (author) from Texas on December 31, 2013:

Use of your photo? I will check my emails. Thanks so much.

Johan J. Ingles-Le Nobel from Holmbury St.Mary, Surrey, UK on November 24, 2013:

Nice. Cindy, I'm trying to contact you about use of my photo. Thank you

Cindy Murdoch (author) from Texas on January 31, 2012:

Thanks kiske! It is pretty obvious that you liked the pictures. Thanks for stopping by!

kiske on January 31, 2012:

OOOOO MYYYYYYYYYYY GOOOOOOOOOD

Cindy Murdoch (author) from Texas on December 07, 2011:

debbie - I am pleased that you enjoyed it. Thanks for stopping by!

Debbie Roberts from Greece on December 07, 2011:

Wow, some quite stunning pictures. An interesting hub.

Cindy Murdoch (author) from Texas on December 05, 2011:

f - I do not either. Thanks!

f on December 05, 2011:

I guess I was writing tongue in cheek about Disney, but maybe it did happen that way; I don't know. Blessings.

Cindy Murdoch (author) from Texas on December 05, 2011:

f - It could have happened that way. Don't know.

f on December 05, 2011:

LOL. Anyway, maybe Walt Disney studied zoology before learning to draw ... .

Cindy Murdoch (author) from Texas on December 05, 2011:

f- LOL! That's true!

f on December 05, 2011:

Yes; the moth's antenna look like a rabbit's ears! (You can almost hear it say: 'What's up, Doc?')

Cindy Murdoch (author) from Texas on December 05, 2011:

Donna Cosmato - I'm glad you enjoyed it. It truly is unbelievable in what macrophotography will allow you to see - such as the moth's antenna. Thanks for the votes and for sharing.

Donna Cosmato from USA on December 05, 2011:

Wow, this is awesome and what a tremendous amount of time and effort you have invested! I kept going back to the close up of the moth's antennae...it was unbelievable. Voted up and shared on my social network.

Cindy Murdoch (author) from Texas on December 04, 2011:

Chasing Riley, good to see you! The eye looks that way because it is a compound eye. I like the way it cocks its head, giving it an almost inquisitive look.

I glad that you are enjoying them.

Thanks for stopping by!

Cindy Murdoch (author) from Texas on December 04, 2011:

WillStarr - Thanks for stopping by and for the votes. Glad you enjoyed it!

The Evolista from Los Angeles on December 04, 2011:

Really amazing! Funny how it's easier to look at flying insects than spiders. The close up of the wasp is fascinating. The eyes look like they are textured.

WillStarr from Phoenix, Arizona on December 04, 2011:

Incredible pics! Up and awesome.

Cindy Murdoch (author) from Texas on December 03, 2011:

carol3san - I can tell that you really do not like bugs, do you? They can be really beautiful if they keep to themselves. Thanks for stopping by!

Carolyn Sands from Hollywood Florida on December 03, 2011:

They a beautiful, but scary looking at the same time...voted interesting.

Cindy Murdoch (author) from Texas on December 03, 2011:

f - Some of the colors could very well be considered to be opulent, couldn't they?

Thanks for the votes and for stopping by!

f on December 03, 2011:

Voted up. Impressive photos! Some of the colors almost remind one of evening gowns at the DAR, Washington DC.

Cindy Murdoch (author) from Texas on December 03, 2011:

RTalloni - good to see you. It has been a while. You ought to check out the flower macrophotography hub then.There are lots of lovely flowers in it.

Thanks for stopping by!

RTalloni on December 03, 2011:

Wow, that's closer to buggies than I imagined. :)

I'm interested in the concept of macrophotography, but with flowers. However, the importance of these insect close ups can't be denied. Thanks for sharing the info!