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Deadly and Dangerous Ocean Creatures

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Our oceans hold so many secrets and life, good and bad. I lived in Florida for over 30 years and stood in awe on the shores countless times.

Blue-Ring Octopus

Blue-Ring Octopus

Lionfish

Lionfish

Our Oceans

Our Oceans

The Wonder of Our Oceans

The Oceans comprise 70% of the Earth's surface! An yet only a small fraction has been discovered. We are the intruders in the underwater world. There are thousands of marine animals, both good, bad, and ugly. We simply need to be vigilant and respect the life below. A good rule is "look but don't touch." They give us oxygen while absorbing 50 times more carbon dioxide. Yet they can be 'angry,' giving us hurricanes, rouge waves, floods, and tsunamis.

There are dangerous and deadly marine life to avoid at all times. Here is a list of the ten deadliest ocean creatures:

  • Pufferfish
  • Lionfish
  • Tiger Sharks
  • Sea Snakes
  • Great White Shark
  • Stingrays
  • Great Barracuda
  • Blue-Ring Octopus
  • Stonefish
  • Box Jellyfish



Pufferfish

Pufferfish

Tiger Shark

Tiger Shark

Stingray

Stingray

Stonefish

Stonefish

Lionfish

Lionfish

Box Jellyfish

Box Jellyfish

Blue-Ring Octopus

Blue-Ring Octopus

Ten Venomous Ocean Creatures

Box Jellyfish

The deadliest and most venomous sea creature is the box jellyfish, also known as the "marine stinger or "sea wasp." The toxicity of the jellyfish and its small stinger is one of the fastest actions in nature. The stingers shoot out even after faster than a bullet from a gun. A box jellyfish can kill a human in two minutes. Found in every ocean and some in freshwater lakes and ponds. They can be as small as a thimble or as large as eight feet with tentacles reaching 200 feet. The tentacles are armed with cnidoblasts, and inside are nematocysts that contain a coiled stinging thread.

Jellyfish are 95% water, and if removed from the ocean, they collapse and die.

There are over 2000 different types, and about 70 can harm humans. They move by taking water in their 'bell' and squirting it out behind them. It is believed shipping has inadvertently distributed them worldwide, allowing them to become invasive. They are able to adapt even in dead zones, and there are hundreds of dead zones in our oceans. In Florida alone, some 200,000 stings are reported each year, and in the Chesapeake Bay, some 500,000 stings.

Blue-Ring Octopus

A venomous creature that lives in tide pools and coral reefs. Found in the Pacific, Indian Oceans across Japan and Australia. Their lifespan is two years. The females die after incubating about 50 eggs. Their venom is capable of killing 26 adults in minutes.

Pufferfish

They have enough toxin to kill 30 adult humans. They are edible, but extreme care must have special preparation.

Lionfish

They threaten native fish and are invasive along the east coast and the Caribbean. They are venomous but not poisonous and can be eaten and taste similar to lobster and shrimp. Their lifespan is 10-15 years.

Tiger Shark

One of the most dangerous sharks and found in shallow reefs, harbors, and canals. They are near extinction because of the hunt for their fins, flesh, and liver.

Sea Snakes

They are poisonous and prefer shallow waters and found in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Appear to be nervous, but their injections are rare against humans..

Great White Shark.

They are found in all major oceans and are responsible for more attacks on humans than any other shark. As of 2010, it is estimated fewer than 3500 exist and are vulnerable to extinction.

Stingrays

They are disk-shaped with a flexible armed tail with saw-edged spines. They rarely kill humans, but the sting can cause acute pain. Their habitat is coastal and subtropical regions. Out of 220 species, 45 are vulnerable to extinction.

Stonefish

With their excellent camouflage, they are hard to spot. Found in tropical waters in the Indo-Pacific and are bottom feeders hiding among rocks or coral. Should you step on one, soak in hot water and seek medical help immediately.

Great Barracuda

Predators that hunt by ambush with their habitat found in the subtropical oceans around the world. Usually swift but rarely harmful.







Comments

fran rooks (author) from Toledo, Ohio on September 07, 2020:

peachy, thanks so much for reading. And, I agree with your comment.

peachy from Home Sweet Home on September 07, 2020:

You know, humans shouldn't disturb these creatures, don't swim in the sea, then you can prevent from stings or bites

fran rooks (author) from Toledo, Ohio on August 07, 2020:

Thanks for reading Liz. Glad you found it interesting.

Liz Westwood from UK on August 07, 2020:

This is a beautifully illustrated article. I have learnt a lot about dangerous sea creatures.

fran rooks (author) from Toledo, Ohio on August 07, 2020:

Ditto and I must start reading your articles!.

Mariah Bruce from Portland, OR on August 06, 2020:

It's a beautiful place that I am blessed to call home.

fran rooks (author) from Toledo, Ohio on August 06, 2020:

Mariah, thanks for reading and your comments. I see you are from OR. My son lives close to Brookings, and I spent a year there in God's country. Beautiful scenery.

Mariah Bruce from Portland, OR on August 06, 2020:

Incredible creatures! Thanks for the info. Love the photos as well.

Rosina S Khan on August 06, 2020:

Fran, I have written a new article, Part-21 for my story series, Keily, the Bookworm. Here is the link:

https://letterpile.com/serializations/Keily-the-Bo...

Please read it and leave your valuable feedback.

fran rooks (author) from Toledo, Ohio on August 05, 2020:

Rosina, thank you for reading. Yes, they can be scary but interesting at the same time.

Rosina S Khan on August 05, 2020:

Thank you for this article, Fran. It was nice to know about 10 dangerous ocean creatures. It sure gave me a shiver down my spine.