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Books 7th Grade

Library Books for Seventh Graders

books-7th-grade

Books 7th Grade

The Books 7th Grade list includes most of the best books for young adults in 7th grade. This site provides links to free book resources and links to purchase many of the books. Most books, newspapers, and magazines are written between a 4th-7th grade level, so you’ll find that this list, while fairly extensive, could be far, far longer. Every attempt was made to inclusively list only the best teacher-selected titles. These are the books teachers use most. Over two hundred teachers were polled in order to make the list of the best books for young adults.

If you don’t find what you’re looking for on this list, you might try the book list for 6th or 8th grade. The difference, in terms of ability level, among books of these levels is minimal, and I would highly encourage you to look at all of these lists. Also, book levels are based on reading difficulty, not content or plot. Many books are highly readable but challenging in different ways, typically incorporating symbolism and other important literary devices. Again, it is entirely appropriate to read books above or below the reading level you are targeting if the book challenges the reader in other ways, perhaps in provocative way.

Book levels are based on reading difficulty, not content or plot. Many books are highly readable but challenging in different ways, typically incorporating symbolism and other important literary devices. It is entirely appropriate to read books above or below the reading level you are targeting if the book challenges the reader in other ways, perhaps in a provocative way. For example, The Catcher in the Rye is certainly a push for fourth grade in terms of content. Perhaps pushing it to seventh or eighth grade may be an option. As you can see, limiting a child to a book, because of a book list or the child's age, is a mistake. Grade-level lists are only guides and careful attention must be taken in order to select proper reading material based on ability and interest rather than a grade recommendation.

Harry Potter - Box Set of Books 1-7

Books 7th Grade

Books, Cliff Notes, and Lesson Plans

7th Grade Level Books

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Animal Farm

Anne of Green Gables

Brisingr

Cider House Rules, The

Cyrano de Bergerac

End, The

Five Little Peppers and How They Grew

Great Fire, The

Great Gatsby, The

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Hero and the Crown, The

Heroes, The

Hitty, Her First Hundred Years

Incident at Hawk's Hill

Incredible Journey, The

Invisible Man, The

Kidnapped

Lincoln, A Photobiography

Little Women

Pearl, The

Penultimate Peril, The

Peter Pan

Rascal

Slippery Slope, The

Time Machine, The

Trumpeter of Krakow, The

Virtual Reality: Beyond the Looking Glass

Wizard of Oz, The

Book Links to Additional Lists

Books 1st Grade

Books 2nd Grade

Books 3rd Grade

Books 4th Grade

Books 5th Grade

Books 6th Grade

Books 8th Grade

Books 9th Grade

Books 10th Grade

Books 11th Grade

Books 12th Grade

Book Banned

Books for Gifted Children

Newbery Award Winners by Grade Level

Pulitzer Prize Winning Novels List: Greatest Books of the 20th Century

Caldecott Award Winners

Seventh Grade Novels and Interest Levels

There has long been a debate between phonics and whole language.  Google “whole language”, and you’ll find almost 20,000,000 articles about the subject.  Google “phonics’, and you’ll find almost 9,000,000 articles.  Google “novels”, and you’ll find over 81,000,000 articles!    

 

There are numerous opposing beliefs when it comes to teaching reading.  Ultimately, regardless of how a child is taught to read, the reading material largely dictates his/her interest level.  Can anybody truly be interested in the reading material contained in most reading texts?  At what point is a child’s interest level as important as the method in which they are being taught to read?  In my twenty years of teaching, I’ve found that the single best way to improve in reading is to read.  I know that sounds simple, but it’s true.  The problem with reading texts is that they really don’t provide a lot of reading opportunities that are interesting, so students never read from them on their own.  Novels, on the other hand, are far more engaging and tend to motivate students to read both in groups and independently.  As a result, I highly recommend novel reading over text reading when it comes to increasing student interest. 

Books 7th Grade: Links to Free Lessons and Resources

Please Make a Comment!

My intent is to continue adding titles, links, and free resources to this list.  Please help me improve this free resource by recommending titles, reviewing books already on this list, providing lessons that can be shared with others, and helping me find additional links to existing sites that are beneficial.  Your comments are greatly appreciated by all. 

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Comments

arizonataylor (author) from Arizona on December 17, 2012:

Yes, it is a seventh grade book, when it comes to reading it. Understanding it is another story. I address this issue in the third paragraph of this hub. Book reading levels do not always sync with how easily books can be understood. The Great Gatsby is typically read in tenth or eleventh grade, but it can be read by an average seventh grader.

Best wishes.

Chriso on December 16, 2012:

The great gatsby for 7th graders? Are u kidding me?

htodd from United States on November 18, 2011:

Great post...really nice post

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