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A Guide to Post-Hurricane Recovery

Hello myself Amna jabeen with seven years of experience in the freelancing industry. I am basically a content writer to writes true stories.

a-guide-to-post-hurricane-recovery
a-guide-to-post-hurricane-recovery

A Guide to Post-Hurricane Recovery

  1. Have a risk-free time tidying up and getting back to your house. If local officials have given the all-clear to come home, heed any cautions posted along the way or at your residence.
  2. Be wary of disaster scams and take precautions.
  3. Send in your request for assistance...
  4. You should take care of your mental wellness.
  5. Prepare yourself now for any upcoming storms.

Thousands of people around the country were affected by Hurricane Ida's storm surge, flooding, and tornadoes. If you or a loved one are currently in a region hit by severe weather this year, here are some steps you may take to get back to safety, obtain the help you need, and go home as soon as possible.

Have a risk-free time tidying up and getting back to your house. If local officials have given the all-clear to come home, heed any cautions

Have a risk-free time tidying up and getting back to your house. If local officials have given the all-clear to come home, heed any cautions posted along the way or at your residence. Take extra precautions near collapsed or damaged structures. Stay out of flooded areas, both on foot and in vehicles. Stay safe during clean-up by following CDC guidelines.

Be wary of disaster-related scams. Regrettably, con artists often target victims of natural disasters and people willing to help by offering money or time. Discover the most recent storm-related rumors that FEMA and the state of Louisiana have reported. The Federal Trade Commission has some advice for avoiding scams, fake government agencies, and application costs for aid (FTC). Call the Disaster Fraud Hotline at 1-866-720-5721 if you've noticed any suspicious activity.

Be wary of disaster scams and take precautions.

Send in a request for assistance. After a major storm, many organizations are financed to aid those in need through housing, food, and business. There are other services available all year round to help individuals in need. If you need assistance with:

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If your home was destroyed in a natural disaster or by human error, the Disaster Home Reconstruction Mortgage Program will help you get a new mortgage to rebuild.

Send in your request for assistance...

Housing and rental assistance: In some situations, FEMA can assist with the rental of a short-term place or the reimbursement of hotel bills. Learn the limits of FEMA's assistance in the event of a disaster. Research state rental aid programs if you require further financial assistance.

You may be eligible for food aid under the Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program if your area is included in an emergency declaration (D-SNAP). To learn more, get in touch with the SNAP office in your area.

You should take care of your mental wellness.

Homeowners and entrepreneurs: The Small Business Administration (SBA) provides low-interest loans to commercial enterprises, charities, individuals, and landlords in regions where federal disaster declarations have been issued. In order to verify if you are eligible to apply, check the status of disaster declarations in your state.

Take care of your mind. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Disaster Distress Helpline is a phone number and text message service available to anyone experiencing a crisis due to a natural or man-made disaster (SAMHSA). Call 1-800-985-5990 anytime, day or night, 365 days a year, for free, confidential crisis help.

Prepare yourself now for any upcoming storms.

Prepare yourself now for any upcoming storms. Wildfires, floods, and earthquakes don't pick and choose when to strike. Use Ready.gov to become ready at home and in your neighborhood. Consider putting together a contingency plan and signing up for official warnings as part of your review of checklists covering what to do before, during, and after various emergencies.

You can always count on USA.gov and FEMA.gov to have the latest updates on aid and services for those who have been impacted by Hurricane Ida.

a-guide-to-post-hurricane-recovery

This article is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge. It is not meant to substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, or formal and individualized advice from a veterinary medical professional. Animals exhibiting signs and symptoms of distress should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.

© 2022 Amna Jabeen

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