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Should These Phrases be Used or Deleted

Many of my hubs originate from my teenage years and those past twenty. Some pieces were funny. Some were sad,.Some were down right scary.

Beware!

Beware!

"Mad as an Old Wet Hen"

The photo above tells a truly-familiar topic that has been around for such a long time. I do not really know why the person who coined the phrase, „Mad as an Old Wet Hen,” but I have met several mad hens as a youngster and did not like them. I can assume that this old phrase can be heard in our country a bit too much. When a married couple is arguing, the husband usually spews, you are acting like an old wet hen! Then the stunned wife acts if she has not heard of an old wet hen. She may have won the argument, only if her husband, „Roy,” would stop and remember that his wife, „Dolls,” was born and bred in New York City and has never met a hen raised or peaceful, so back off, „Roy” and get on with your life.

To me, the above photo really defines the upcoming Democratic Convention in Firey Forum, Milwaukee. You know that when the party goers and delegates reaches the ground area that there will be drinking, yelling, hard music, more drinking, yelliing, some fighting, and more yelling and even a few conventioneers having passed-out from drinking way too much. So the „Raining Cats and Dogs,” fits easily with all of the delegates holding signs and yelling, it will make you remember the „raining cats and dogs.” I promise.


Zzzzzz . . .

Zzzzzz . . .

The "Cat Nap"

Ahhh, the proverbial „Cat Nap,” has been a part of our United States slang since the 1940s. And the beauty of this phrase explains itself. „Cat«s Nap.” So I am already confused. This one cat that I see nodding and purring, well is the cat nap that he is enjoying that he lifted from some cat somewhrere else or did he create the cat nap all on his own? Now that I bring this up, there has never been a clear-cut number of seconds, minutes or hours that gives us a „cat nap,” but all of the cats that I interviewed as I wrote this story were as in the dark as we were.

Delicious, but dangerous. Maybe.

Delicious, but dangerous. Maybe.

"Sweet as Candy"

Lets chat a moment about „Sweet as Candy.” Ahhh. Isn«t this introduction as sweet as candy? I wonder how many people across the world has never eaten candy? I am not talking about the NeoDiet-Candy or Seaweed Candy, but pure unadulterated chocolate candy and in this title of „sweet as candy” is not a misnomer. A lot of people old and young use this term in daily life when describing their wives, girlfriends, boyfriends and husbands, to brag on them for being so, well, „sweet as candy.” That should take the place as those „Oh boy!” „Gee!” and those „Wow!”

Good for our environment.

Good for our environment.

"That Really Bugs Me"

If you have stopped reading this hub just because the text „bugged” you, then go to the source: me. Then you can say, that Ken Avery just bugged me, and you will be correct all day long. And while I can resort to some good, old-fashioned „bugging,” but in a clean way, I also find that in 2020, there is a lot of secret „bugging” of cars, homes, and other establishments by those who are much wiser and stronger. I would say more but that only „bugs” nne,

Cats and dogs can really fly.

Cats and dogs can really fly.

"Raining Cats and Dogs"

To me, the above photo really defines the upcoming Democratic Convention in a Fine Forum, Milwaukee. You know that when the party goers and delegates reaches the ground area that there will be drinking, yelling, hard music, more drinking, yelling, some fighting, and more yelling and even a few conventioneers having passed-out from drinking way too much. So the „Raining Cats and Dogs,” fits easily with all of the delegates holding signs and yelling, it will make you remember the „raining cats and dogs.” I promise.

"Sleeping Dogs Lie"

Do not disturb.

Do not disturb.

and without further mention to the Fab Four, for which the aforementioned line came from „Hard Day«s Night,” „And I«ve been working like a dog,” but in my case, people who give their very all to their jobs can easily be described as being so tired that they are going to take a „dog«s nap.” Sure, dogs are almost-busy from daylight until dark, but soon the hour will ring when the working, running dogs will stop, find their favorite shady tree (in someone«s yard) and sleep the numerous hours all with a smile on their lips. I do not blame them for taking dog naps. Fact is, I give them my personal salute for all that they do for us in America.

P.S. one of the original titles of this saying was "sleeping like a log," but this one fits. Thanks, K.A.

Do not get close to this sight.

Do not get close to this sight.

"Hot as Fire"

„Summer means one thing: Hot as Fire,” and this phrase is not to be attached to bathing beauties wit two-piece bathing suits laying sprawled in the hot sun just to get a tan. The temperature of course will be „hot as fire,” but so will those young guys who think that they are „it” and begin to live via their trying to impress other single gals which makes their own gals jealous and before the sun goes down, bam! World Championship Boxing in Daytona Beach and all without Mike Tyson.testosterone.

August 7, 2020____________________________________________________

© 2020 Kenneth Avery

Comments

Sherry Haynes on August 15, 2020:

Remembered these from my childhood. I don't know why but I have not heard these in years. Anyway, I had a fun time reading the hub.

Milly Light on August 15, 2020:

The rest can be deleted but the one for "raining cats and dogs" should not be deleted. Hot as fire sounds more like a fact than a phrase.

The one for mad hen sounds funny. I have heard it but never made it part of my vocabulary.

I was waiting to read about "liar liar pants on fire!" too. Haha

Linda Rogers from Minnesota on August 09, 2020:

Hey Kenneth, good to see your still crazy as ever. I enjoyed the old sayings and how we all remember them in our own way. Hope you and your family are healthy during these crazy times. Take care my friend.

Lee A Barton from New Mexico on August 09, 2020:

I love these old sayings, although I get a confused look from many younger people when I use them.

Doris James MizBejabbers from Beautiful South on August 09, 2020:

"Mad as an old wet hen" was my dad's favorite old trite expression. I really understood it recently when one of my little hens refused to let me herd her into the coop when a mid-afternoon shower blew in. Until it started to rain, that is.

Remember Red Skelton's "it's raining cats and dogs, I just stepped in a poodle"?

Ann Carr from SW England on August 09, 2020:

Interesting take on these phrases, though I'd never heard 'mad as an old wet hen' before! We use the expression 'mother hen' if a woman is really caring and fussy about her family, offspring and friends but I can't think of any other sayings regarding hens. I'll have to watch ours and see what I can come up with!

'Mad as a March hare' is self-explanatory - ever seen them boxing? Amazing!

Love all the illustrations too, Kenneth.

Entertaining hub. Keep safe and well.

Ann

Liz Westwood from UK on August 09, 2020:

I appreciate your fresh and inciteful look at phrases that many of us roll off without giving a lot of thought to them. Great illustrations too. I hope that you are keeping well.