Updated date:

Get Hired: Jobs That Are Tattoo Friendly

Author:

Erin is a writer and content creator from Georgia, United States. She loves coffee, books, and puppies.

jobs-that-are-tattoo-friendly
As a larger majority of people possess tattoos today, employers are focusing more on the abilities of a job candidate, but many are still asking them to cover up once hired.

As a larger majority of people possess tattoos today, employers are focusing more on the abilities of a job candidate, but many are still asking them to cover up once hired.


As tattoos become increasingly popular, they are being considered more acceptable in our culture. These permanent markings are still frowned upon by many people and workplaces. There is still hope for those that are job hunting. A good rule of thumb for an interview is to cover them up and then learn about their appearance policy. If hired and you are feeling brave, expose them a little at a time. Even though generally these jobs are becoming more tattoo-friendly, remember that it also depends on in what area the job is located, what each company's values are, and the individual that is in charge of the hiring.


Tattoo artists make an average of $20,000 to $50,000 a year based on experience and the amount of work that's available.

Tattoo artists make an average of $20,000 to $50,000 a year based on experience and the amount of work that's available.

Tattoo Artist


Of course this is the easiest job to have when covered with tattoos. Don't forget that tattoo parlours sometimes also house piercers. In additon, they need people to answer the phones, collect money from the customers, and process their accounts.

Artist


Anyone that is in a creative field with tattoos is usually accepted, because it is understood that they can be used for artistic expression. Types of occupations in this area include sculptors, painters, computer animators, interior designers, and comic illustrators. These jobs or fields provide more freedom to display body art then those that are in the business world.


Matthew Fox played Jack Shepherd in the popular 'Lost' TV series.

Matthew Fox played Jack Shepherd in the popular 'Lost' TV series.

Actor/Actress


Actors and actresses of today continue to succeed despite having several tattoos. Although, they are usually placed where they can be covered up if needed. Some can be used to work into a character's personality. Others just fade into the background as the plot of a movie or series becomes more important then the appearance of one particular character.


Model


If aspiring models really want to be successful, they won't go overboard with their tattoos. Those covered in body art are not marketable. Clothing designers want a model to be a clean slate. Those with tattoos can book some jobs, but they might be fewer, because modeling hopefuls are at the discretion of the designers' personal tastes and visions. They have to find what works for each shoot or fashion show. The best route is to get small tattoos that aren't obscene and can be covered easily by many different types of clothing.


Some restaurant owners may feel that an employee's service skills are more important then minor aspects of his or her appearance.

Some restaurant owners may feel that an employee's service skills are more important then minor aspects of his or her appearance.

Restaurant Worker


You can be a waiter or waitress in some restaurants, but you probably won't work at a high end restaurant. Newer or small downtown joints in large cities might be a smart choice. In particular, cooks have the advantage, because they aren't seen by the public.


Retail


Not all stores allow tattoos to be worn by their employees. Don't expect to work as a sales associate or manager at expensive clothing stores. Those working in warehouses or in the back rooms of stores would have more leeway with showing their body art. As tattoos become more popular, however, some chain stores allow their employees to wear them openly. In my experience, I have learned that Walmart, Target, and various discount or dollar stores generally allow their employees to display them.


Adam Levine, from the band Maroon 5, has several tattoos covering his body.

Adam Levine, from the band Maroon 5, has several tattoos covering his body.

Band Member


Most band members today, including singers and musicians, have tattoos. It is a part of their image and persona when on tour or whenever they are in the public eye. The bad part about this is it's not a job that's financially stable. Many people try to make it as a band member, but few actually achieve success. If you are in a band, then the upside is that it's widely acceptable to display your tattoos with abandon.


Cubicle or Computer Jobs


Some companies might not mind that you have tattoos if you aren't really seen by the public. This can include cubicle office jobs. While it is best to keep them covered when first meeting a company, they may not mind as much after you're hired. Computer or technology-related occupations may be the same way. Working for a social media company like Twitter or Facebook would be great for those with permanent body art. They are always looking for young and talented professionals and wouldn't mind much, because you would be working mostly behind the scenes. Other careers in this field could include tech support, a software developer, or a web designer.


When all else fails, cover them up.

When all else fails, cover them up.

Comments

Dee on May 15, 2014:

Tatoo on your face and neck=NO job

jameson on September 30, 2013:

is there a modeling agency just for people with tattoos for men??

f on August 15, 2013:

And PS: You've added more photos!

f on July 21, 2013:

Hi ebower! re-read your great hub, after a while has gone by. So have you revisited your thoughts about subjects such as ear stretching, and tattoos, just recently? Blessings.

Jmillis2006 from North Carolina on March 28, 2013:

I do not have tattoos but the grooming saloon I work at does not allow them to be shown the also do not allow you to have a haircut or color that could be considered un natural.

f on March 28, 2013:

Anyway, this is a subject you seem to have learned quite a lot about. Why not also write a hub about ear gauging? which I think you also know quite a lot about? (Just a suggestion.)

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on March 22, 2013:

f: I don't think employers would have a problem with it. They might not like it if it was a neon color or something that looks very unnatural. Other than that, I'm sure most would be fine with it.

nstrang: That's a smart way to enjoy tattoos. It frees you up to express yourself in the way that you want, but having the option to cover it with clothing is an intelligent way to make yourself employable. I hope you find a new job soon. Thank you; I would be honored if you read more!

FullofLoveSites: I don't have tattoos either, but I think it's a good topic to discuss, because people do have them today. Thanks for sharing! I hope it helps your friends. :)

khmazz: Yes, I think society is changing and that's a good thing. A person's skills and work experience are more important than merely their appearance. Thank you!

Kristen Mazzola from South Florida on March 22, 2013:

I am a huge supporter of "inked in the workplace" being a business professional with tattoos I am thankful for the stigma lessoning throughout society! Great hub!

FullOfLoveSites from United States on March 22, 2013:

Though I don't have a tattoo, still I enjoyed reading this hub. Will share this to my "inked" friends. More often than not they're rejected despite their qualifications just because of the tattoo. This hub might help them. Thanks. Voted up and shared. :)

nstrang on March 21, 2013:

Very insightful information, especially because I am in the midst of applying for a new job, and that is one of the key factors in my decision to "go for it" with each company. I currently have 9 tattoos, and all of them can be hidden in one way or another with clothing. Although I get the tattoos because they represent something about me, I do feel that the manner in which I have decided to get them (knowing they can be hidden) works in my favor if an employer is strict on their appearance rules. Great Hub, look forward to reading more of your work :)

f on March 21, 2013:

BTW, Ebower, what do you think of tattooing lipstick, or at least the dark outline around the lips? (Few employers would be able to object, surely.) Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on March 21, 2013:

DanielleCherise: You are so right! Thanks for sharing. :)

Dani Norris from Virginia Beach on March 21, 2013:

Don't forget about the military!

f on January 28, 2013:

Hi; any movement on the gauges lately? Blessings.

f on November 13, 2012:

I see; so how's the ear stretching going at the moment?

Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on November 13, 2012:

f: Yes, I like ear stretching better. :)

f on November 12, 2012:

Okay, ty, ebower. You seem pretty sure of yourself, there, anyway. (You're probably more into other forms of bodyart, such as lobe stretching, I think, right?)

Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on November 12, 2012:

f: I'm not going to get a tattoo, but I enjoy others' tattoos as an art form.

f on November 11, 2012:

Or maybe for your a tatt is exclusively for other folk, only...

f on October 29, 2012:

(eg, like as the big 30th b-day is on the horizon, for instance?)

f on October 29, 2012:

It's interesting that some companies are more flexible.

So, EBower, are you any nearer an eventual tattoo plan?

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on September 13, 2012:

teach84: I think having positive tattoos is a great way to be a role model towards students. Many schools will probably want you to cover them up, but there might be some more flexible schools that will allow you to show them if they are small. I guess the main idea is to use caution and think about all the possibilities before getting a tattoo.

Ashley: Thanks for sharing your personal experience with tattoos in the workplace. Yes, it's very important to check a company's policy before deciding on a new tattoo. That's very good advice. Thanks for your helpful comment!

Ashley on September 13, 2012:

Interesting. I work at a huge company and people have small visible tattoos and piercings in several areas of the company including finance. I'm not saying they are the CFO or CEO, but they are easily making well over $50K in professional roles with tattoos. Just check the company policy before getting tattooed in an area that could be visible. Also, make sensible choices with tattoos that are visible. Do not have offensive symbols, language, etc. showing in the workplace.

teach84 on July 31, 2012:

I have 1 yr of school left before completing my education degree in AYA Integrated Social Studies (7-12 grade Social Studies) and I just got my first tattoo on my left inner wrist. It is the word determination written in Arabic with a small hot pink heart next to it. The way it is written also means perseverance as well as persistence. I know that many schools will not hire people with visible tattoos, some will require it to be covered at all times (not a problem), and some do not require them to be covered.

I feel that as long as the tattoo is not vulgar or offensive (like "I love Satan," etc...) it should not be a problem. I'm 28 and waited to choose one that had meaning to me. I have had to work full-time through a back injury in order to pursue this degree. In general I have always been a very determined individual and go after what I want. I am also considering getting one on my foot that represents reaching for the stars aka going for your dreams. Some it will show unless I am wearing tennis shoes, although it can be covered with a bandaid. (I typically wear flats).

Yes teachers are supposed to be role models to students, but I do not see how tattoos, especially ones like mine are bad influences. Teachers with tattoos show students it's ok to be individuals while still being good, "normal" people. Most teachers are not ultra-conservative like they want us to portray to the public. If a student says something about it, I'd explain the significance, but then also explain I took my time deciding and waited until I was older to make such a permanent decision. (Good Learning opportunity there). Many students have them and a large number of parents have them unless you are teaching at a private school or at a school in a well-to do district.

What are you feelings on this? Like I said I have no problem covering it if necessary, but would prefer not to do so.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on July 25, 2012:

f: They are definitely topics of interest for me. I'm glad I was able to teach you something. :)

f on July 25, 2012:

Well, anyway, you do seem to know a great deal about make up and tattoos. You've obviously studied them a great deal and I guess I could say that you've taught me quite a bit, anyway. Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on July 01, 2012:

f: I'm not sure if I am, but I'll take it. :)

f on July 01, 2012:

Yes, well you really are a tattoo connoisseuse, Ebower, aren't you. God bless.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on July 01, 2012:

f: Yes, I'm glad it's become popular; no regrets.

f on July 01, 2012:

It seems to have mushroomed, and almost taken a life of its own. (No regrets, then?)

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on July 01, 2012:

f: Yes, it is; almost to the day in fact!

f on July 01, 2012:

Wow, is it a year since you published this hub?

f on February 14, 2012:

Yes, I know what you mean, ty. 'That doesn't mean I wish everyone had tattoos.' No, I don't, either! But I guess part of it is being, in general terms, more female-tattoo-friendly, right?

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on February 14, 2012:

f: That's true. If you mean that I wish that more people were open to tattoos on others then yes. I think it's a personal choice and what's important about a person is what's inside. That doesn't mean that I wish everyone had tattoos, but that people wouldn't judge others based on them.

f on February 11, 2012:

I see; anyway, I think you once mentioned that you are in a small, Southern town where not so many people (and not so many women) have visible tattoos.

So I guess you wish that people there were a little more tattoo-friendly, and more specifically, that more women there were tattoo-friendly, too. Right?

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on February 08, 2012:

mfriedstore: This is very true. I'm sorry I missed your comment. Thanks for your input! :)

f: No, I haven't seen any recently.

f on February 08, 2012:

PS: Ebower: so did you see any good tattoo designs lately?

f on February 01, 2012:

mfriedstore: "it is your way of expressing yourself to other people what you feel."

This is true, although for some ppl — Ebower and many others included — they wish to keep to themselves from a practical how they really feel in terms of expressing themselves by this medium (which is fine). For other people, a tattoo is almost principally an expression to the person himself or herself. (Re. herself: in North America a small majority of tattoo parlor clients are now actually women.)

mfriedstore from 176 Flushing Avenue Brooklyn , New York on January 26, 2012:

everyone of us bagged with unique talents wherein it is up to us on how to use it. Well, there is nothing wrong with tattoo, indeed it is your way of expressing yourself to other people what you feel. Though, other people find it untidy, it only depends to the people on how they are going to define this artwork.Thank you so much for this inspiring information of yours.

f on January 25, 2012:

Yes, and your comment about the rose and compass design being vintage-looking was apt, too. I guess you saw the rose and skull design, too; I wondered what your impression was. (It used to that only men got designs incorporating a skull motif, but this is changing, especially if combined with flower patters, as the one shown.)

Anyway, it's an absorbing study, with many avenues and with lots of aesthetically engaging aspects. Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on January 25, 2012:

f: Yes, you are right. Cool; I'll have to check it out.

f on January 25, 2012:

PS: And there's been more commenting on makinbacon's tattoo hub, too, that you contributed comment to.

f on January 25, 2012:

YW; and it seems they are anyway a subject that you definitely like very much. Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on January 25, 2012:

Yes, I understand now; thanks. :)

f on January 25, 2012:

Ebower: Yes, I simply meant by backtracking I guess, on the one hand part of your emphasis is your evidently considerable interest in and liking for tattoos; on the other hand, another aspect for emphasis is that you're not planning one yourself in the foreseeable future. (Whatever term you prefer, I guess!) Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on January 25, 2012:

f: Backtracking is legal and I'm just telling the truth. :)

f on January 25, 2012:

"f: Yes, I do appreciate them on others as an art form, but that's as far as they go for me personally."

Oh okay, yes I understand you like to back track a little, which is fine. Blessings.

f on January 25, 2012:

Business Time:

Re. "A very respected doctor friend of mine just completed her full back piece that was 9 months in the making; my elementary schoolteacher friend is practically covered everywhere that isn't visible in a classroom; my tattooed fiancé works at a Montessori school. I'd be very interested to know how many of the people in dark suits and shiny shoes and briefcases that I pass every day have tattoos that no one sees in their normal work attire".

Yes, I'm sure what you say is true. I'm sure that so many professionals are having it done. Like, you said, often it's in a placement where if the person wants and it the occasion suggests it, the tattoo can be covered.

Maybe the author of this hub, Ebower, if she ever eventually decides to go down this route, this is how she would prefer to do it. Like your doctor friend, like your teacher friend, like your fiancé, get the design done: become a tattooed professional but always in a placement that can be covered.

Makes sense, right?

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on January 25, 2012:

f: Yes, I do appreciate them on others as an art form, but that's as far as they go for me personally.

f on January 25, 2012:

I saw your very recent appreciative comment about rose tattoo designs on the other hub. You certainly seem to like them, right? and your appreciation doesn't seem to be diminishing.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on January 12, 2012:

f: Yes, of course I'll be tattoo friendly for any year. I try not to judge people by their outer appearance.

f on January 12, 2012:

(...which I guess is slightly different, right? Blessings)

f on January 12, 2012:

But to sum up from the title of this well-written hub, are you going to be tattoo-friendly in 2012...?

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on January 02, 2012:

Haha; agreed. No tattoos for me in 2012. :)

f on January 02, 2012:

Yes, it's nice, isn't it; something rather elegant about it, isn't it. Photo well spotted by you, anyway.

Re. New Year: with the new year, comes resolutions, right?

(There considerations of elegance aside, I guess with you, however, you are resolved NOT to become a tattooed lady in 2012. Correct?)

Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on January 02, 2012:

Correct; I like it, but I'm not sure I like it for me. Happy New Year to you as well, f!

f on January 02, 2012:

A Happy New Year to you, Ebower!

Blessings.

f on December 24, 2011:

Yes, while the tattoo sleeve itself might not be traditional, the remainder of the appearance of the bride in the photo you reblogged is certainly traditional, to the extent of being gracefully and refinedly so.

'I liked it' ; 'can be elegant'; sounds as if this bridal photo appeals to you, anyway. (Whether a similar bridal tattoo sleeve would appeal to you in the future as your bridal look, is another matter which would remain to be seen, I guess, right?)

Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on December 24, 2011:

f: I didn't upload that photo, but I liked it, so I reblogged it on tumblr. I guess I wouldn't use the term 'traditional', but can be elegant; yes (modern would be the word I would use).

Merry Christmas! Not anything very special, just spending time with family and attending church. Yes, I agree that that wouldn't work very well, because tattoos are very permanent and would stay on your skin all year long lol.

f on December 24, 2011:

ebower:

Anyway, have a great Christmas! Planning anything special?

(And BTW, if you think about it, the idea of a 'Seasonal' tattoo design wouldn't really work at all, would it, because it wouldn't be so relevant year round and it's by nature permanent, right?)

Blessings.

f on December 12, 2011:

ebower: Not sure if it was you that uploaded the photo of the bride with a sleeve tattoo on the whenheavencalls page, mentioned on your Hubpages homepage, that you also subscribe to; even more than your photos on this page, it kind of confirms how a sleeve can be combined with, rather than being opposed to, a traditional look of formal elegance.

(Some of the sleeves photos you have supplied on this page are probably more casual in context.)

Hope this makes sense, too.

Blessings.

f on December 11, 2011:

TattooKitty: 'I try to make the most of it by using my tattoos to help the students better understand literary terms, such as metaphor and symbol. It's much easier for them to understand these abstract concepts when connecting them to visual examples.' Interesting that you should be able to link literary themes with your ink; like, bridging the abstract with the aesthetically concrete.

f on December 08, 2011:

PS: Business Time: "you need to accept that you can't make everyone like it, and you need to be OK with that." Well, exactly; in the end the person has to do his or her own thing, and move on.

f on December 07, 2011:

I see. Anyway, the Point of No Return for gauging can vary from one person to another. But, then, tattoo removal is possible, though sometimes difficult and can leave the skin looking different. So on the one hand it's not an exact comparison between tattooing and gauging. And on the the other, there are some similarities which, though limited, are reasonably strong, too. To use your words, 'something would have to 'click' within me; clarity like you said': this seems to have happened with your desire for gauges. Similarly, an inner 'click' about the gentle enhancement of a tasteful faith design, if you ever wanted one, would be what would make the approach to you of the tattooist's needle happen. (Makes some sense?)

Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on December 07, 2011:

f: Yes, I understand what you are saying. I decided to just go for it after I thought about whether or not gauging my ears would be a good idea. I realized that it's not completely permanent and that helped me in my decision.

f on December 06, 2011:

Business Time: "I would find it more difficult to cover my lower arm or wrist than to cover my upper arm." Yes, upper arm is regularly a placement choice for a first tattoo.

f on December 06, 2011:

Yes, an already liked, nice faith tattoo design, if this 'click' within you that you speak of, happens, is sth that you'll really KNOW to go ahead with, when you experience the 'click'.

(Though different, not unlike the inner 'click' you must have experienced when you decided you want to gauge your ears.)

Sounds okay?

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on December 06, 2011:

Yes, that's makes sense. I don't know what to say other than that. I guess something would have to 'click' within me; clarity like you said.

f on December 06, 2011:

(Does this ring true, at all?)

f on December 06, 2011:

Yes, and, don't worry, that sense of certainty about it — if it happens at all — will be very clear to you.

(Basically it's the sort of clear certainty about the permanence of it. Because at an abstract level, the general idea of a tasteful faith tattoo design probably already seems nice to you. Getting certainty, is the key.) Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on December 06, 2011:

f: Yes, I will have to be certain in order to get one.

f on December 06, 2011:

If the time ever comes, when you want to do it, you'll be sure in your mind, I think.

Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on December 06, 2011:

f: Yes, you definitely made sense; I understand what you're saying. Aptly put: 'Well, exactly. It's just possible that one day, you might for faith testimony reasons firmly want to become a tattooed lady (but if so, way into the future).'

Perhaps; this could be true. I don't know.

f on December 04, 2011:

Re. Tattookitty: 'Wonderful topic for a hub (and very well-written)!' Yes, it is, isn't it? And Ebower is a talented writer.

Re. ebower: 'Her tattoos could have faded over the years'. Yes, well it's not unusual for people to touch up their tattoos with more color after some years. So it's possible that the young lady in the photo that you supplied was photographed when she was 'due' for some added ink, right? if this is what she wanted, anyway.

f on December 03, 2011:

Re. 'hot and cold':

Oh, it's just an expression, meaning wavering between two aspects of something. Whereas my point was, and it's your view too, I think, that for anyone getting a tattoo, the person needs to be firmly wanting it as a constant thing.

'I'm not one to say the word 'never', because I can't predict the future and I don't like eating my words.'

Well, exactly. It's just possible that one day, you might for faith testimony reasons firmly want to become a tattooed lady (but if so, way into the future).

I guess this makes sense?

Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on December 03, 2011:

My faith is most definitely important to me and permanent. This doesn't mean that I have to have something that symbolizes my faith permanently on me. I'm not sure what you mean by hot and cold. I do not plan to get a tattoo, but I'm not one to say the word 'never', because I can't predict the future and I don't like eating my words.

f on December 02, 2011:

You're right about the permanence. And I guess the notions of permanence and faith are deeply connected, too.

Anyway, you must know, or think you know, what your preference is; I do sense that you sometimes blow hot and cold on the whole issue and, most definitely, one needs to blow hot constantly before going ahead, right?

Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on December 02, 2011:

I might; it's just too permanent for me.

f on November 30, 2011:

In fact, you would likely count it an honor to bear faith based ink, wouldn't you?

f on November 28, 2011:

Like a Bible related word or words, or symbol, I suppose. But anyway, these days the whole question of placements seems to be more fluid, with not only male but female tattoos being sleeves, like the waitress picture you supplied. Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on November 28, 2011:

Haha; lucky guess I suppose. I'm not sure either, but it would most definitely have something to do with my faith.

f on November 28, 2011:

PS: I wouldn't have a clue about your preferred placement, or about the design, though faith related might come into it, I think.

Blessings.

f on November 28, 2011:

(Smile.) I guess so...!

I can't read your mind though. Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on November 28, 2011:

You know me well. If I did get one, I would want it exactly as you have described.

f on November 28, 2011:

You'd probably prefer significantly brighter colors on any eventual one, I reckon (though probably smaller, I guess). Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on November 28, 2011:

f: Yes, they definitely are. Her tattoos could have faded over the years or she could have chosen more muted colors.

f on November 27, 2011:

PS: Also, the waitress photo might be some what of an under-exposure(?), which could be made more colourful, I don't know; also, the fact is that when ppl get tattoos, they sometimes have the pigmentation added to after some years, and I guess we don't know how long the young lady in the photo has had hers done. (Two cents'.) Blessings.

f on November 27, 2011:

Ebower: the comments made by Business Time, above, are rather interesting, aren't they? Blessings.

f on November 11, 2011:

BusinessTime:

Yes, for a business environment I agree it takes more effort and planning to cover the lower arm. More effort, though not an insurmountable difficulty.

I'm sure you would also argue that the full sleeve has become a legit. female as well as male tattoo look. I guess you'll extend yours to a full-sleeve when you are ready. And not before.

Sarah Kolb-Williams from Twin Cities on November 11, 2011:

Exactly -- that was the choice that I made, and those were my reasons. I would find it more difficult to cover my lower arm or wrist than to cover my upper arm.

f on November 10, 2011:

BusinessTime: Interesting, thorough comments.

Obviously you have put a great deal of thought into your half-sleeve. I was wondering: are half-sleeves by definition the upper arm? because you were referring to the idea of getting a full sleeve eventually, but you want to be able to cover it easily for work, still. So I guess that most half-sleeves are upper arm and ppl 'graduate' to the lower arm afterwards. (Rather than a half-sleeve on the lower arm, 'graduating' later to the upper, also.)

However, some ppl like a wrist tattoo, and in some cases it can also be extended later into a sleeve. So some ppl do begin with the lower arm. Depends on the work environment, I guess.

Sarah Kolb-Williams from Twin Cities on November 07, 2011:

I honestly think the times are changing (although, again, I understand that the Twin Cities culture might be a little more relaxed than others). A very respected doctor friend of mine just completed her full back piece that was 9 months in the making; my elementary schoolteacher friend is practically covered everywhere that isn't visible in a classroom; my tattooed fiancé works at a Montessori school. I'd be very interested to know how many of the people in dark suits and shiny shoes and briefcases that I pass every day have tattoos that no one sees in their normal work attire -- I think a lot of people against "tattoos in the workplace" would be surprised to learn how many of their peers have made that choice for themselves without feeling the need to broadcast it in their professional lives.

Everyone has personal responsibility, and everyone has their own way of looking at the world around them. I never go into a situation expecting to force someone else to accept me, tattoos and all. I know how to be respectful and dress for the occasions I'm in, and I have the foresight to know what's going to cause a problem.

Case in point: I've been wanting to extend my half-sleeve for awhile now, but since I'm not a full-time freelance editor yet and because I plan on going to PTA conferences with my future children, it's a priority of mine to be able to comfortably cover my tattoos whenever I feel like it. I've decided the full-sleeve can wait until I figure out my life a little more, so instead I got a smaller thing (a John Lennon scribble-portrait) on the back of my neck that I've been mulling over since high school and never made the jump, knowing that all I have to do to cover it is wear my hair up (which I do nearly all the time anyway). My reasons are my own, and whoever sees it sees it because I choose to let them.

I guess my point is that what we're really talking about here is visible tattoos vs. covered tattoos -- not tattoos vs. a lack of them entirely. At the end of the day, it's a personal decision -- what you want to put on your body, where you want to put it, and whether or not fitting into a corporate society in the future factors into that decision. And if a potential employer would ever ask me point blank what's going on under my clothes, I would stand up, thank them for making my employment decision easier, and leave.

If you decide to get a tattoo somewhere you can't cover when the situation demands, you need to accept that you can't make everyone like it, and you need to be OK with that. (That's fine -- not everyone is going to like you anyway, no matter what you refrain from putting on your body. As with everything else, you make your decision, you accept the consequences, and you move on with your life.)

f on November 07, 2011:

PS: Re. Business Time's sleeve comment: I don't speak for her but I think she said on another hub that she is works on a franchise basis in a law office and I reckon that if franchising is going to be increasingly part of the workplace scene, then it will be also increasingly hard for company managements to 'avoid' the presence of ppl who, like Business Time, enjoy sleeve art (which can be covered sometimes anyway).

Blessings.

f on October 27, 2011:

'f: I like her sleeve, but I wish the colors were more vibrant; that's just my opinion. I would definitely get a small tattoo if I did get one.'

There's your word 'vibrant' again! (You did an interesting hub on the spectrum of colors a while back.) So you think if women or men are prepared to get a sleeve, it's good if they go the whole way, as it were, and make sure the colors are vibrant and bright?

If you get yours, I guess you'll consider getting vibrant colors, too, though maybe not on with a sleeve placement? (Something faith related, maybe?)

Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on October 27, 2011:

f: I like her sleeve, but I wish the colors were more vibrant; that's just my opinion. I would definitely get a small tattoo if I did get one.

BusinessTime: Wow; that sounds really cool. I appreciate people and businesses that look at what's most important: a person's skills (and inside rather than one's outside). Thanks for sharing your personal experience!

Sarah Kolb-Williams from Twin Cities on October 27, 2011:

I have a half-sleeve (planets and galaxies), along with an assortment of other smaller tattoos, and I work in a law office as a writer, editor, and product developer. Luckily for me, the wonderful people I work with appreciate my talents and dedication rather than focus on my body, and it's a simple matter to throw on a sweater for special occasions.

Then again, I live in the Twin Cities -- a pretty progressive area as far as personal expression goes, to be sure.

Thanks for the great hub and for providing a great venue for discussion.

f on October 26, 2011:

So do you like the tattoo sleeve of the restaurant waitress in the photo you supplied?

Would such a tattoo design still be a bit much for you, even if you did get a tattoo eventually? i.e., maybe you'd get a smaller design?

Blessings.

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on October 26, 2011:

I wouldn't know personally, because I don't have one, but it's most likely not perceived as weird if females get them now.

f on October 26, 2011:

Tattoo sleeves used to be a male thing. But exclusively, certainly not any more. When they get them, women now feel they do it confidently and appropriately, right?

Erin Bower (author) from Georgia on October 26, 2011:

I think they can look good on both genders. To me, it just depends on the person. Oh cool; I'll have to check that out soon.