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Disability in the Workplace

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4+ years as a sales development representative BTW MENA& Italy. Managing B&Bs . Msc in international management.

The barriers to employment for people with disabilities are diverse and systemic. Employers often express concern about the ability of people with disabilities to perform the work vacancies they are advertising. Such concerns are a result of a lack of disability awareness and negative attitudes. Disabled people are as diverse as their non-disabled counterparts, but employers who express concerns about their incapacity or inability to perform a particular task are homogenizing this diverse group.

Reasons for underrepresentation

While employees with disabilities may show lower performance than peers without disability, this may simply be because the employer has not provided them with appropriate accommodations. For example, a data entry clerk with arthritis may require more time to type than a coworker without arthritis. Accommodations can be relatively inexpensive, but they must be tailored to the individual. Workers may be less likely to take the initiative to request accommodations if they are not aware that they are required.

In addition to lack of visibility, disability rates tend to be under-reported. A study of diversity statements at Fortune 500 companies found that only 50% of companies had disability-specific inclusion policies. This means that managers tend to underestimate the number of workers with disabilities. Furthermore, many disabilities are invisible and difficult to assess, so systematic government surveys tend to underestimate their prevalence. Individual managers also underestimate the numbers of employees with disabilities.

Barriers to reasonable accommodations

When requesting a reasonable accommodation in the workplace, it is important to be aware of any limitations that may exist in an employee's situation. An example of a reasonable accommodation might be to adjust a work schedule, for example, a programmer's request for an 8:00 a.m. start time instead of a 6:00 p.m. finish time may be appropriate for some employees, but not for others.

The duty to accommodate is ongoing. The employee may need only one accommodation, or several. They may need one reasonable accommodation for a short time and later require a different one. Reasonable accommodations are required to be practical and effective in meeting the needs of the individual with the disability. The employer should make reasonable accommodations, if necessary, for the employee's specific disability and the job duties. It is important to note that accommodations must be effective, or else they may result in undue hardship.

Employer responsibilities

One of the main issues employers face when dealing with disabled employees is determining which job duties they cannot perform. Some disabilities are so severe that employees may be passed over for a position that would be a better fit for them. In such cases, employers must consider whether the disability would create a hazard in the workplace. However, they cannot assume that this risk will be present simply because of the disability. Rather, employers must prove that the disability is likely to cause a substantial amount of harm.

If a disability prevents a person from performing a job function, the employer must provide reasonable accommodations for that employee. Reasonable accommodations are usually the kind of desk or chair an employee is required to use or a computer that meets certain specifications. It may be difficult to reach high shelves in a department store or to lift objects that are too heavy. Employers should make sure that the equipment they use is accessible to disabled employees.

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Employers must be careful not to make a spectacle of the accommodation process. They should not micromanage or discuss accommodations in front of other employees. Instead, they should work with the disabled employee to keep their co-workers in the loop about the process and prevent gossip, speculation, and resentment. Disabled employees should be allowed to control the terms of confidentiality. However, employers must not be blatant in their demands.

Barriers to employment

The barriers to employment for people with disabilities are diverse and systemic. Employers often express concern about the ability of people with disabilities to perform the work vacancies they are advertising. Such concerns are a result of a lack of disability awareness and negative attitudes. Disabled people are as diverse as their non-disabled counterparts, but employers who express concerns about their incapacity or inability to perform a particular task are homogenizing this diverse group.

In a recent study of business owners with intellectual disabilities, researchers found that there is limited support for self-employment among people with intellectual disabilities. They also find that these individuals are paid less than their male peers.

Reasons for underrepresentation

While employees with disabilities may show lower performance than peers without disability, this may simply be because the employer has not provided them with appropriate accommodations. For example, a data entry clerk with arthritis may require more time to type than a coworker without arthritis. Accommodations can be relatively inexpensive, but they must be tailored to the individual. Workers may be less likely to take the initiative to request accommodations if they are not aware that they are required.

In addition to lack of visibility, disability rates tend to be under-reported. A study of diversity statements at Fortune 500 companies found that only 50% of companies had disability-specific inclusion policies. This means that managers tend to underestimate the number of workers with disabilities. Furthermore, many disabilities are invisible and difficult to assess, so systematic government surveys tend to underestimate their prevalence. Individual managers also underestimate the numbers of employees with disabilities.

Barriers to reasonable accommodations

When requesting a reasonable accommodation in the workplace, it is important to be aware of any limitations that may exist in an employee's situation. An example of a reasonable accommodation might be to adjust a work schedule, for example, a programmer's request for an 8:00 a.m. start time instead of a 6:00 p.m. finish time may be appropriate for some employees, but not for others.

The duty to accommodate is ongoing. The employee may need only one accommodation, or several. They may need one reasonable accommodation for a short time and later require a different one. Reasonable accommodations are required to be practical and effective in meeting the needs of the individual with the disability. The employer should make reasonable accommodations, if necessary, for the employee's specific disability and the job duties. It is important to note that accommodations must be effective, or else they may result in undue hardship.

Employer responsibilities

One of the main issues employers face when dealing with disabled employees is determining which job duties they cannot perform. Some disabilities are so severe that employees may be passed over for a position that would be a better fit for them. In such cases, employers must consider whether the disability would create a hazard in the workplace. However, they cannot assume that this risk will be present simply because of the disability. Rather, employers must prove that the disability is likely to cause a substantial amount of harm.

If a disability prevents a person from performing a job function, the employer must provide reasonable accommodations for that employee. Reasonable accommodations are usually the kind of desk or chair an employee is required to use or a computer that meets certain specifications. It may be difficult to reach high shelves in a department store or to lift objects that are too heavy. Employers should make sure that the equipment they use is accessible to disabled employees.

© 2022 Maria

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