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Collaboration Between Leadership and Consultant

Is there a need for collaboration between the company's leadership and you as the consultant?

What is the role of the consultant when proposing changes?

Give an example where collaboration is mandatory between leadership and the consultant.

Consultant Collaboration

The collaboration between a company’s leadership and the consultant is vital to ensuring the success of the consultation. A lack of collaboration between the leadership and the consultant could lead to intervention pitfalls like not managing change resistance and/or misunderstandings of I-O terminology (Hale, 2007). Intervention pitfalls can be managed properly if the consultant and the leadership collaborate during the intervention. For example, the pitfall of not managing change resistance is typically caused by there not being a plan to handle change resistance; the consultant and leadership collaborating to have a plan in place to proactively manage the change resistance the employees may experience can avoid this pitfall. The misunderstanding of I-O terminology often occurs between the leadership and consultant in regards to certain key terms like: evaluation, measurement, criteria, and metrics (Hale, 2007). This issue tends to be caused by a lack of active collaboration between both parties and a lack of communication. An active collaboration between the leadership and the consultant would ensure that both share the same understanding of the I-O terminology and allow any terminology misunderstandings to be corrected by the consultant prior to the occurrence of later misunderstandings. The collaboration between the company’s leadership and the consultant is vital to ensure the intervention process occurs smoothly and avoids the intervention pitfalls that often occur due to a lack of collaboration.

Role in Proposing Changes

An active collaboration between the company's leadership and the consultant will allow the consultant to develop a more effective strategy and, as a result, being able to propose more effective changes to the leadership. The consultant’s role when proposing changes to the leadership is to offer assistance to the leadership in the form of expert advice (Merron, 2005). The consultant’s role is to provide expert advice to the leadership in the form of proposing changes that are backed by theory. The consultant’s expert advice should be based on their understanding of the causes of the problems, those involved, the client’s desired outcome, and proven theories. The advice should be developed based on the consultant’s expertise, influence and personal skills through the eight phases of the internal consultant process. According to Barnes and Scott (2012) the eight phases of the internal consultant process that a consultant should follow for are: contact, agreement, information and assessment, feedback, alignment, targets and transition strategies, implementation, and evaluation and learning.

The consultant’s understanding of the organizational issues and the organization’s culture of the company will allow the consultant to select theories and strategies to account for the both the strengths and weaknesses of the organization. The consultant will then be able to create and present an effective strategy that accounts for the most effective types of motivators for the employees in order to have their productivity increase (Wynter-Palmer, 2012). The presentation of a strategic framework with integrated proven psychological theories and an action plan is the consultant’s main role in proposing changes to the leadership.

Mandatory Collaboration

There are certain situations where a collaboration between leadership and the consultant is mandatory to ensure the success of the consultation. One such situation would be the need for changes to be made to the leadership style of the chief executive officer (CEO) of Sanderson Soaps. The need for Emily Sanderson to change her leadership style will require a collaboration between leadership and the consultant as the change directly affects the CEO herself. Additionally, the recommended personnel changes in regards to the vice presidents of product development and production division and distribution division, will also require collaboration between the leadership and the consultant in regards to managing the change, filling both roles, and handling any change resistance. If the CEO were unwilling to collaborate on these changes, then it would be impossible for the changes to be implemented as the changes could not be implemented without approval and assistance from the CEO.

References

Barnes, B. K., & Scott, B. (2012). Internal consultant. Leadership Excellence, 29(8), 10-11.

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Hale, J. (2007). The performance consultants fieldbook: Tools and techniques for improving

organizations and people (2nd ed.). John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Merron, K. (2005). Masterful consulting. Consulting to Management, 16(2), 5-11,54-58.

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Wynter-Palmer, J. E. (2012). Is the use of short-term incentives good organization

strategy? Compensation and Benefits Review, 44(5).

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