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MOBO’s Mobito Is A Kid’s Three Wheel Crusier

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Bike riding is the kind of healthy outdoor exercise that every kid should enjoy. But since it’s high off the ground, a lot of safety precautions must be taken — they’re not done under an abundance of caution because unfortunately kids do fall off bikes. So a helmet (always) must be worn, but also elbow and knee pads often make an appearance. Then to this must be added the chain mechanism that makes up a part of the bike’s moving capabilities. A lot of maintenance here is essential, especially these days since parts aren’t as plentiful as they used to be (horror story about a friend having to wait 4 months to get a new chain for his bike, brrr…). What’s needed is a bike that is safer because it’s not so tall and so is more stable by its nature. It should also be more simplistic in how a kid’s feet translates into acceleration for the wheels. And it should look good too and come in various colors: purple, red and yellow. In short it should be MOBO’s Mobito.

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The Mobito comes partially assembled — meaning the hard parts of the wheels and the tires are already there. The frame is designed to expand outward as the child grows — it’s not made for a single age. Additionally the back is more inclined for better support (better than that of the adult version, to be accurate) because it can be angled. And of course the seat is padded.The parent gets to assemble the rest but it’s not like X-Mas morning when the bike that’s been assembled has lots of parts lying around it. MOBO provides a well detailed video that goes into the specifics of assembly and all that is needed as regards bolts and nuts and tools is provided — because it’s pretty simple. About the only hard part we found when we assembled our adult sized MOBO Triton was making sure the brake cable went around the frame so as to be seated away from touching the ground. Here it’s a lot easier to avoid that. Also the rear-wheel alignment is automatically done, which is pretty cool in itself.

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Because it has three wheels, the Mobito by design is not so high off the ground. Actually it’s really pretty close to the ground (making you think it’s a go-kart but no motor) so it’s really, really hard to fall off it unless you’re really, really trying. And even then you’d more or less have to fall of one side by forcing yourself. But for sure there’s a good reason to wear the protective head and arm and foot gear protection — just that problems that could develop with a high off the ground bike are many times less likely to happen here. That doesn’t mean a parent shouldn’t supervise a kid riding, just that the parent worrying about a fall and the kid hurting themselves is far less likely. Because it’s only 9 1/2 feet off the ground.

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Having three wheels also means the Mobito is extremely stable — it stands on its own, no kickstand or clutching handlebars to keep it upright. In fact the “handlebars” are more like side levers that each hand grips and moves to/fro to steer the bike around. Now let’s get a few specifics out of the way before a kid climbs on board: the age for riding this is 3 and above. The pedals are at the front, that’s normal, but there’s no chain because the pedals connect directly to the front wheel by a gear mechanism which has the feet providing pedaling power. Obviously it’s not going to be really fast but it won’t be a turtle either: peddling forward is normal but stopping peddling doesn’t stop the wheel from turning. No the kid doesn’t stop by putting their feet out and onto the ground like in the Flintstones; there’s an emergency brake handle that, when squeezed, causes it to stop. That brake also comes in handy if on an incline, because the Mobito can start to moving down on its own. So best to start and stay on an even surface as inclines can be problematic. But because the tires can be damaged from potholes and cracks in the pavement and loose gravel/rocks, etc. — having it ridden on a clean pavement is best. As example, our friends nephew’s 8 year old son rides the Mobito on his block, which is in a gated community where there’s very slow traffic and a well maintained street. And even though there’s a reflector and a flag sticking out at the back, the kid does not ride once it becomes dark (dusk even).

The Eagles have a song about a new kid on the block. If your kid is riding MOBO’s Mobito, they’re going to suddenly acquire more street cred than their Dad’s motorcycle for sure. For more details, go to https://www.mobocruiser.com/MoboMobito-p/tri-201.htm

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