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Banksy Graffiti - Girl Frisking Soldier, Molotov Guy With Flowers & Suicide Butterflies - Wall Vinyl Decals

I've always loved creativity. In art and craftwork, I can embroider, knit, crochet, make clothes and earrings, paint, draw, and decorate.

I think that Banksy's graffiti art is a bit like Marmite - you either love it or hate it (if you have ever tasted it, or even heard of it)

Banksy is now world-famous for his street art, showing a sharp eye for left-wing political statements combined with a wry sense of humor. It is very much art for the proletariat - commenting on the exploitation of the poor by the rich and powerful.

Whether or not you agree with Banksy's political viewpoint, you can still admire his technique and sharp take on human society, even when he characterizes it as anthropomorphic rats, always with something cutting to say, or up to antics.

Banksy is now world-famous for his street art, showing a sharp eye for left-wing political statements combined with a wry sense of humor. It is very much art for the proletariat - commenting on the exploitation of the poor by the rich and powerful.

One of the principals of graffiti art is that it is somewhat ephemeral - it may be permitted to stay up for a long period of time, but is just as likely to be swiftly removed by outraged owners of buildings and structures after a very short airing to its devotees. The work of some graffiti artists, particularly Banksy, has become so popular that it has reached international acclaim, and, instead of being wiped off and destroyed, it is painstakingly chipped away from the wall and preserved to be sold for a vast fortune.

The philosophy of street artists is that their work is freely given for all to see - a gift, in fact, to the community. But the law states otherwise, namely that the art becomes the property of the person who owns the wall on which it was painted.

On May 2012, a little before the Queen's 50th Jubilee and the Olympics, Banksy painted a very telling picture of a young child machining British bunting (a line of decorative small flags), called Slave Labour. This was on the wall of a Poundland discount shop in Wood Green, London.

The inference was that the reason we are able to buy cheap goods in the UK is because certain businesses import items manufactured in countries where child exploitation is endemic - sweated labour.

The local community was very proud to have their own public work of art bestowed on them in their local shopping area, and people came from far and wide to view it. This included my own family, and lower down the page you'll see a photo of my grandson standing next to it.

Then, one night in February 2013, Slave Labour disappeared, chiselled out of the wall, and news sources reported that it was being swiftly auctioned off in the USA by an anonymous seller, in spite of very strong objections by the local community who claimed it as their own.

Within a few days It was withdrawn and returned to the UK because of the general outcry, but Slave Labour has now been sold to an anonymous buyer in the USA. and it turns out that it was actually sold by the owner of the building, who has every legal right to do so, despite protests from others on moral grounds. According to The Huffington Post, it sold for more than £750,000

Below are two more Banksy wall pictures, Molotov Guy with Flowers, and Suicide Butterflies:

I like Banksy's humor and sense of the ridiculous.

He always likes to turn things around in some way - challenging people's perceptions - like the strong man being searched by a girl, and the violent man hurling a bunch of flowers - it's not necessarily that the art is so good, it's the concepts it conjures up.

These decals are easy to put up on the wall, and come with full instructions.

Molotov Guy With Flowers

Below is a Video About Banksy, his Graffiti and the World he Inhabits

He likes to be anonymous, and covers his face so that he is not recognized, which enables him to go about his business of guerrilla graffiti - cutting out his stencils and spray-painting walls, statues and other structures.

Quite a lot of information about Banksy's art in this one

Banksy's Child Labor shows a small child making union jack bunting sprayed on a wall in Wood Green, London but now controversially sold off

This was painted on the side of a cut-price superstore to underline the fact that we buy cheap clothes sourced from factories abroad that use child labour

This was painted on the side of a cut-price superstore to underline the fact that we buy cheap clothes sourced from factories abroad that use child labour

Let's see What People Think About one of Banksy's Latest Graffitti

How do you feel about graffiti - does it annoy you and prick at your sense of good order? Or do you secretly admire a renegade spirit?

Does it depend on how good it is, or where it is, and whether it is desecrating someone else's property, or whether it should be saved for posterity? Leave a comment below:

Comments - Don't be shy - tells us what you think!

Ann Carr from SW England on August 13, 2015:

They seem to ignore it around here but if you initial it, then they get you! I think if you're caught in the act then you've had it!

Ann

Diana Grant (author) from United Kingdom on August 11, 2015:

I had not heard that graffiti is allowed providing it is anonymous. In fact, I would have thought that in the UK all graffiti is actually "damage to property", unless you own the building or have been requested by the owner of the building to decorate it.

Ann Carr from SW England on August 01, 2015:

I think his art is very clever, better than most graffiti. But, when all is said and done, it's illegal to deface public places, I think?

When does art become art rather than graffiti? I'm not sure.

Around our area of Bridgwater, Somerset, there is much graffiti which is just junk; where does one draw the line? I gather that if you don't initial it or put some sort of recognisable symbol to it, then it's allowed. Is that right?

Interesting stuff and a great hub! Thank you for following me.

Ann

Anna from chichester on April 22, 2014:

I adore Banksy - his work is so controversial and raw. Great lens and I loved reading it

Diana Grant (author) from United Kingdom on April 10, 2014:

@Brite-Ideas: Madness really

Barbara Tremblay Cipak from Toronto, Canada on April 09, 2014:

I have to add that it's incredible the amount of money it sold for

Diana Grant (author) from United Kingdom on November 28, 2013:

@AcornOakForest: Banksy has been famous in the UK for years, but is just becoming well-known around the world

Diana Grant (author) from United Kingdom on November 28, 2013:

@Craftymarie: Yes, if it's just names and initials, then the lettering must be spectacular, otherwise it's just rubbish

Marie on November 28, 2013:

I like interesting and well thought out graffiti and not just hasty sprayed names and initials. Sometimes it can brighten up run-down housing.

Barbara Tremblay Cipak from Toronto, Canada on November 28, 2013:

I think there's a place for all art, including graffiti - the Banksy decal you featured sure does make a statement, but I think there's a place for that somewhere as well. Why not, it's art, it's supposed to make us think (maybe think twice!) lol

Monica Lobenstein from Western Wisconsin on November 28, 2013:

I really like well-done graffiti. Some tagging isn't very high quality and looks as trashy as people think, but a lot of graffiti are really works of art. I have heard of Banksy but didn't know much about his work. Thanks! This was interesting.