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Bird's Beak and Food

Their beak are the most important for birds to search food and it's like a bird's hands, feet and spoon.

beak-and-food

Bird's beak are not just part of their mouth, as they are used for food and many other tasks. If you look closely at different species of birds, you will notice that the birds use their beaks to find food in the mud or in tree trunks, to break seeds, to dissect prey, to build a nest, to feed the chicks and it is also used for climbs on the trees and hang in to the vines. The beak is like a bird's hands.

Looking at the anatomy of different groups of animals in the fauna, one realizes that only birds have beaks. In the course of evolution, in changing climates and the animal's body underwent changes as it survived the changing natural conditions. Of these, timely, useful and necessary changes persisted. It was during this journey that the beaks of birds were formed.

The different species of birds that have evolved have varied in color and size, but although the type of beak varies according to the type of bird, the basic structure of the beak of all birds is the same. The beak of any bird is divided into two parts. The upper part - the maxilla and the lower part - the mandible! Most birds have external respiratory organs on this beak. If you look closely, you can see two small holes at the beginning of the bird's beak. Birds breathe through these holes.

While the birds are in the eggs, a tooth-like part also appears on the tip of their beak. It is called 'Egg Tooth'.This small tooth grows on the beak of a fully grown bird in the egg. With the help of this tooth, the bird breaks its egg shell inside and comes out. All birds have this egg tooth. The exception is Kiwi chicks. These chicks kick and break the egg shell. Some birds, such as storks, are always seen biting their long beaks. The sound they make when they hit the beak has different meanings.

beak-and-food

If you list the birds that are remembered for the characteristic shape of the beak, then of course the cormorant, the hornbill, will probably come first. The beak of pink flamingo birds is characteristically shaped. Flamingos, with their pink, scarlet wings, use the name 'Firey Wings', which is crooked in the beak. The method of finding and eating flamingo food is a bit different.

beak-and-food
beak-and-food
beak-and-food

The first thing that comes to mind when you say bird's beak is 'spike'. It applies to birds of prey such as eagles These birds, which prey on a wide variety of animals, from snakes to rabbits, have a curved, pointed beak that allows them to hold their prey tightly, tear it apart, and cut it into pieces. The upper part of the beak is slightly longer and curved than the lower part. On the other hand, the carpenter, Huppo, has a very straight beak. They want to find ground insects, insects hidden in tree trunks and take them out and eat them.

beak-and-food

Sunbirds, known as sugars, suck the sweetness out of flowers. For this, they have a long, curved beak longer than their body. Smaller than a sparrow in size, the sunbird sits comfortably on a petal and feeds on the flower with its thin, curved, long beak without pushing the flower.

beak-and-food

Most common bird of prey is the parrot. The parrot not only eats peanuts or seeds as small as sesame seeds with its thick but curved beak, but also uses its beak as a foot when it walks on tree branches. The beak is straight and pointed, catching accurate fish by jumping on the water. Even the beak of the mad which feeds on insects, especially fish, is so straight and long that it is easy to catch flying flies and locusts. The beak of a nesting nest is not very different from that of a beetle. It has a 'small beak' and the question arises as to how a sugaring bird makes a nest weaving skill.

One thing comes to mind when you look at this bird's beak. In this vast expanse of nature, every soul has a special place and nature has given him some weapons to live in that place. The beak of a bird is a good example of this. Each bird's beak seems to change according to its habit, food; But what if the birds that play such different roles are not in the same area? Nature has the answer to this 'then' too. Thirteen species of finches are found on the island of Galpagos in South America.

Now that the finches are of the same species, their basic anatomy is the same, but they all have different diets, meaning that one finch eats insects on the ground and the other eats hard-shelled fruit. The third eats grain, while the fourth eats insects from tree bark. Now, due to the change in eating, the shape and texture of all these beaks have changed. After reading this information about the beaks of birds, the meaning of the saying 'He who gives beaks also gives fodder' may have come to mind.

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